T




SABINE, JONATHAN
CT

[First] Lieutenant, Connecticut Privateers


Jonathan Sabine was commissioned as a Lieutenant aboard the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Hermione (or Harmony, Commander THOMAS HOPKINS) on 14 August 1782. Sabine was described as age 31, 6 feet tall, slender build, with gray eyes, long dark hair, and a light complexion. Hermione captured the British brigantine Cumberland on 10 September 1782, after a short fight. Sabine was sent aboard the Cumberland as prize master and brought her into New Haven on 4 October 1782. [Middlebrook, MCR, II, 120]


SACKETT, JAMES
[MD]

First Mate, Maryland Privateers


James Sackett was possibly a resident of Baltimore, Maryland. He was appointed as First Mate on the Maryland Privateer Brig Duke of Leinster (Commander Robert Caulfield) on 20 January 1781. [NRAR, 278] In May 1781 the Duke of Leinster was captured by the British. [NOAR, 52]


SADLER, EMORY
MD

Owner, Maryland Privateers


Emory SADLER was a resident of Chestertown, Maryland. He was associated in privateering with JOHN McLURE and JOHN MITCHELL. Vessels associated with SADLER:
As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

9/12/78

MD

Schooner Polly Sadler (6/25)

John Mitchell

Emory Sadler, John McLure & Co.

John Mitchell, Emory Sadler

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 418]


SAFFORD, WILLIAM
MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


William Safford was a resident of Salem, Massachusetts. He was associated in privateering with SAMUEL JONES and ELISHA SIGOURNEY. Vessels associated with Safford:
As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

6/4/82

MA

Brigantine Recovery (12/15)

Samuel Ingersoll

Samuel Jones, William Safford et al

Samuel Ingersoll, William Safford, Elisha Sigourney

Benjamin Hammatt, Henry Hill [NRAR, 435]


SAGE, COMFORT
CT

Owner, Connecticut Privateers


Comfort Sage was a resident of Middletown, Connecticut. He was associated in privateering with JOSEPH SMITH, JOHN PORTER, ASHBELL BURNHAM, ELIJAH HUBBARD, EDWARD HALLAM, EBENEZER SAGE, GEORGE STARR, and CHAUNCEY BULKLEY. Vessels associated with Sage were:
As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

4/7/80

CT

Schooner Bunker Hill (10/45)

Sanford Thompson

Comfort Sage & Co.

Sanford Thompson, Joseph Smith, Comfort Sage

Timothy Green, Rebecca Green [NRAR, 244]

4/10/81

CT

Brigantine Delight (8/20)

Nathan Post

Comfort Sage & Co.

Nathan Post, Edward Hallam, Ebenezer Sage

Amasa Learned, Samuel Johnston, Jonathan Trumbull, Jr., Joshua Young [NRAR, 266]

5/4/81

CT

Sloop Hamlin (6/12)

Timothy Starr

[Comfort] Sage & Co.

Timothy Starr, Jonathan Trumbull, Jr., John Porter

Joseph Abel, Joseph Gery [NRAR, 323]

7/26/81

CT

Brigantine Delight (8/20)

Samuel Johnston

Comfort Sage & Co.

Samuel Johnston, Comfort Sage, George Starr

Jabez Hamlin, Willard Wright [NRAR, 266]

4/15/82

CT

Brigantine Unity (8/20)

Ashbell Burnham

Ashbell Burnham, Elijah Hubbard, Comfort Sage

Ashbell Burnham, Elijah Hubbard, Comfort Sage

Jabez Hamilin, Samuel W. Dana [NRAR, 484]

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

6/1/80

CT

Brigantine Van Tromp (12/55)

Sanford Thompson

Uriah Rogers & Co.

Sanford Thompson, Comfort Sage, James Church

[NRAR, 484]

1/3/81

CT

Ship Chatham (16/35)

Joseph Smith

Chauncey Bulkley, Joseph Smith & Co.

Joseph Smith, Comfort Sage, Ashbell Burnham

Jabez Hamlin, Samuel W. Dana [NRAR, 252]


SAGE, EBENEZER
CT

Owner, Connecticut Privateers


Ebenezer Sage was a resident of Middletown, Connecticut. He was listed as the owner of the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Dolphin (Commander JOSEPH SMITH) on 30 July 1779. [NRAR, 271] In November 1780 he was commander of the Connecticut Privateer Brigantine Delight, and made a voyage to the West Indies. [Middlebrook, Maritime Connecticut During The Revolution, 69-70] He served as a bonder for the Connecticut Privateer Brigantine Delight (Commander NATHAN POST) on 10 April 1781. [NRAR, 266] Sage was associated in privateering with JOSEPH SMITH, ASHBELL BURNHAM, THOMPSON PHILLIPS, EDWARD HALLAM, and COMFORT SAGE.










As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

7/30/79

CT

Sloop Dolphin (10/25)

Joseph Smith

Ebenezer Sage & Co.

Joseph Smith, Ashbell Burnham, Thompson Phillips

Elisha Clark, Arthur Magill [NRAR, 271]

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

4/10/81

CT

Brigantine Delight (8/20)

Nathan Post

Comfort Sage & Co.

Nathan Post, Edward Hallam, Ebenezer Sage

Amasa Learned, Samuel Johnston, Jonathan Trumbull, Jr., Joshua Young [NRAR, 266]


SAGE, GILES

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Giles Sage was born in 1742. He was a resident of Middletown, Connecticut when he commanded the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Lucy. Lucy was captured by HMS Mars on 6 February 1779. The prisoners were sent to New York. On 21 February the American prisoners rose and took the Mars from the British crew. The Americans sailed the Mars to Guilford, Connecticut, where she was beached. Mars became the Connecticut Navy Sloop Guilford (Captain WILLIAM NOTT). Sage died in 1788. [NOAR, 268]


SAGE, NATHAN

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Nathan Sage was a resident of Middletown, Connecticut. [NRAR, 284] He was commissioned, on 6 January 1779, to the Connecticut Privateer Brigantine Middletown. [NRAR, 392] On 29 January 1779, [NOAR, 268] with the help of Connecticut Privateer Sloops Beaver (Commander William Havens) [NOAR, 268, 144-145] and Eagle (Commander Edward Conkling) [NOAR, 268, 69] the British brig Ranger was captured. [NOAR, 268, 69, 144-145] Middletown was abandoned to the enemy on 1 February, 1779 at Sag Harbor, New York. [NOAR, 268] He served as a bonder for the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Nancy (Commander MOSES TRYON) and to the Connecticut Privateer Brigantine Samuel (Commander JOHN BULKLEY, JR.) on 17 August 1779. [NRAR, 399, 454] That same day Sage was again commissioned,  to the Connecticut Privateer Schooner Experiment. [NRAR, 284]  He captured the British brig Argyle, the schooner Charming Sally, the schooner Dolphin, and some other vessels. [NOAR, 268] On 7 February 1781 he was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Ship Hunter. [NRAR, 347] In the Hunter Sage captured the brig Resolution, and recaptured the Hibernia. On 7 February 1781 [perhaps 1782]  he was recommissioned to the Hunter. [NOAR, 268]


SAGE, TIMOTHY

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers

 

Timothy Sage was a resident of Middletown, Connecticut. He was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Gates on 2 September 1779. [NRAR, 308] In the Gates he captured the British sloop Fly from Newfoundland. [NOAR, 268] Sage was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Ship Hunter on 3 July 1781. [NRAR, 347] In the Hunter he captured the privateer sloop HIBERNIA, which may have been captured twice before and recaptured by the British.  He re­turned to Middletown in April 1782  [NOAR, 268].


SAINT, JOHN

PA

First Lieutenant, Pennsylvania Privateers


John Saint was commissioned as a First Lieutenant aboard the Pennsylvania Privateer Brig Fame (Commander JOHN TAYLOR) on 19 March 1781. He was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [NRAR, 289] He listed his age as 26. In March or August 1781 the Fame was taken by the British [NOAR, 268]


ST. BARBIE, WYATT

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Wyatt St. Barbie was a resident of Newburyport, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Success on 18 April 1782. [NRAR, 466] In 1779 he commanded the Massachusetts Privateer [unknown] Collection and was taken by the British in July 1779 [NOAR, 268].


ST. VALERY, NICHOLAS

[See DE ST. VALERY, NICHOLAS]


SALISBURY, JONATHAN

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Jonathan Salisbury was born in 1735. [NOAR, 268] He was a resident of Chatham, Connecticut. Salisbury was commissioned, on 10 October 1778,  to the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Industry. [NRAR, 351] She assisted in the capture of the British brig Venus in October 1778. [NOAR, 269] Salisbury died in 1818. [NOAR, 268]


SALMON, GEORGE

MD

Owner, Maryland Privateers


George Salmon, a resident of Maryland, was associated in privateering with DAVID STEWART and SKINNER ENNALLS. He was associated with the following vessels:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

2/28/81

MD

Schooner Parragon (6/16)

Charles Dashiell

Skinner Ennalls, David Stewart, George Salmon

Charles Dashiell, John Davidson

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 409]

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

8/10/78

MD

Sloop Widow Wadman (7/14)

Salisbury Blackmer

David Stewart & Co.

Salisbury Blackmer, George Salmon

William Hyde [NRAR, 492]


SALMON, JONATHAN

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Jonathan Salmon commanded the Connecticut Privateer Boat Refugee. In November 1778 he raided British camps on Long Island and seized a herd of cattle which he took to Connecticut. [NOAR, 269]


SALSBURY, JONATHAN

[CT]

Master, Connecticut Privateers


Jonathan Salsbury was aboard the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Nancy (Commander ROBERT PALMER) in June 1777 as Master. On 30 June Nancy was captured by HM Frigate Unicorn. Salsbury was a prisoner at Newport in October 1777, but had been exchanged by 5 November 1777. [see Nancy]


SALTER, FRANCIS

MA

Second Lieutenant, Continental Army Boston Squadron


Francis Salter was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the Continental Army Boston Squadron on 20 January 1776 and assigned to the Continental Army Schooner Franklin. [NOAR, 269] A Francis Salter of Marblehead, Massachusetts was committed to Mill Prison on 7 August 1777. He was serving on the Fancy. He escaped on 22 December 1778. [Kaminkow, 166]


SALTER, JOSEPH

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Joseph Salter was a resident of Marblehead, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Raven on 26 April 1779. [NOAR, 269] In 1781 he was serving aboard either Massachusetts Privateer Minerva or Brutus (of Salem) as a Prize Master. He was captured by the British and committed to Mill Prison on 16 January 1781. [Kaminkow, 166]


SALTER, RICHARD

NH

Commander, New Hampshire Privateers


Richard Salter was a resident of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. He was commissioned to the New Hampshire Privateer Brigantine Swan on 22 December 1780. [NRAR, 470] Salter served as a bonder for the New Hampshire Privateer Sloop Blossom (Commander THOMAS MANNING) on 31 May 1782. [NRAR, 241]


SALTER, TITUS

NH

Commander, New Hampshire Privateers


Titus Salter was a witness to the bond of the New Hampshire Privateer Schooner MaClary (Commander ROBERT PARKER) on 2 September 1776. [NRAR, 381] He was commissioned to the New Hampshire Privateer Schooner Ann in July 1779. Ann participated in the Penobscot Expedition and was captured by HM Frigate Scarborough and Hampden. Salter was later exchanged. Early in 1783 he was in command of the New Hampshire Privateer [unknown] Scorpion when he was captured a second time by HM Frigate Amphion. Salter was put aboard a prison ship at New York. [NOAR, 269]


SALTONSTALL, DUDLEY

CT/(P)

Captain, Continental Navy


Dudley Saltonstall was born in New London, Connecticut in 1738, a grandson of Governor Gurdon Saltonstall.. He was a merchant captain before the war and had commanded a privateer in the Seven Years' War. Saltonstall was a tall man, 5'9" with sandy hair, light complexion and hazel eyes. At the outbreak of the war he enrolled in the militia and commanded the fort at New London in 1775. Saltonstall was 37 when the war began. The Naval Committee, at the solicitation of Silas Deane, a member of the committee and a delegate to the Continental Congress from Connecticut, who was also Saltonstall's brother-in-law, appointed Saltonstall a captain in the Continental Navy on 27 November 1775. Saltonstall accepted the appointment on 7 December 1775, on which date he is entered on ship Alfred's muster roll. Saltonstall was commissioned on 22 December 1775, being the senior captain in the Navy list of that date. He arrived in Philadelphia the next day, to find he had been assigned to the flagship (Continental Navy Ship Alfred) of Commodore ESEK HOPKINS' fleet. Saltonstall participated in the New Providence Expedition and the Battle off Block Island, making no original contribution to either one. Following the arrival of the fleet at Providence, Rhode Island in late April 1776, Saltonstall was president of two court-martials held aboard the Alfred: ABRAHAM WHIPPLE on 6 May 1776 and JOHN HAZARD on 8 May 1776. Hazard later claimed that Saltonstall had treated him unfairly and demonstrated "partiality" during the trial (Hazard was convicted). The Alfred was far from a happy ship. When First Lieutenant JOHN PAUL JONES was assigned to Continental Navy Sloop Providence on 10 May 1776 he managed to obtain Saltonstall's blessing. Jones wrote a letter detailing the characteristics necessary for an officer, and, by inference, Saltonstall lacked these: he was unlearned and lacked "Strong and well connected Sense." Speaking specifically of Saltonstall Jones said he had a "Rude Unhappy Temper." Nor was it just Jones for a sailor who served on the Alfred had this to say in a letter to Esek Hopkins: "Capt Saltison i will Not Saile with But you i Can Saile So Long is i Live." While the Alfred lay in Providence River Saltonstall made several trips back to Connecticut. From 5 June to 14 June 1776 he was in his home town, New London, looking after the men in the hospital for Hopkins. Meanwhile numerous complaints against Hopkins, Saltonstall and Whipple were received by  the Continental Congress and the Marine Committee. On 14 June the three were ordered to report to Congress for an investigation. These orders were received by Hopkins on 20 June and the three met before departing for Philadelphia. At this meeting, according to Jones (as told to him by Commodore Hopkins), Saltonstall told the other two that he "would Agree to be Broke if the Congress would allow them half pay." By early July 1776 the three were in Philadelphia: the investigation began on 2 July. After hearing testimony the Marine Committee reported that the charges against Saltonstall were not "well founded." Congress accepted this finding on 11 July and ordered Saltonstall to report to his ship. Saltonstall set out with Whipple and arrived back in Connecticut in August 1776, presumably pausing at his home before proceeding to Providence, where he arrived 1 September 1776. Saltonstall not only convinced the Marine Committee of his innocence but was recommended by the committee to command the Continental Navy Ship Trumbull. He was so appointed and commissioned by Congress on 22 August 1776. Saltonstall drew up the muster roll of the Alfred and turned over command of her to First Lieutenant JONATHAN PITCHER on 8 September. Jones, her next sea commander, noted acidly that Saltonstall had "kept his Ship Eight months in Providence River and then left her with a Fished Main Mast and only one Common pump that would work." Saltonstall was ranked fourth on the Captains' List of 10 October 1776, no longer the senior captain in the Navy. On 14 October he was at Middletown, Connecticut on business for Barnabas Deane (the superintendent of the Trumbull). Saltonstall was asked for several small assorted food items from John Cotton at Middletown on 19 November 1776, and was hoping to get Trumbull to sea very soon. In mid-February 1777 Saltonstall journeyed up to Boston for a meeting of seven Continental Navy captains in which uniforms were the main recorded topic, but not the only one. Jones, the recorder of the meeting, took the occasion to ask Saltonstall about a nasty rumor: that Saltonstall had accused Jones of disloyalty. Saltonstall admitted that he had discussed it with Commodore Hopkins, but was "Astonished" that Jones thought he was the originator. Saltonstall pointed the finger at Hopkins. At some time before 28 February 1777 Saltonstall and Whipple employed lawyers to start legal action attaching all prize money in the various Continental Agents' hands because the cruising vessels of the original fleet were not following the "association" (an agreement to share all prize money equally, signed by most of the crews of the original eight vessels). Jones, commenting on this noted that "the Gentry who Set that Agreement on Foot...have taken Care to keep out of harms way themselves..." (referring to Saltonstall and perhaps Whipple).

On 4 April 1777 the Marine Committee, in a circular letter to the New England based captains, urged Saltonstall to get to sea. [NRAR, 42] On 12 March 1779 the Marine Committee ordered to Navy Board of the Eastern Department to make some allowances for Saltonstall. [NRAR, 99-100] On 27 April 1779 the Marine Committee directed the Navy Board of the Eastern Department, to turn over command of the Confederacy to Saltonstall, if Captain Seth Harding was found to be the reason she was delayed in getting to sea. [NRAR, 104] On 20 May 1779, the Marine Committee, writing to the Navy Board of the Eastern Department, directed that, if Captain John Burroughs Hopkins was suspended, Saltonstall was to replace him. [NRAR, 106]

Following the disastrous Penobscot Expedition he was dismissed from the Navy. Saltonstall was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Brigantine Minerva, with sixteen guns and 120 men on 21 May 1781. [NRAR, 393] On 24 June 1781 he captured the British schooner Arbuthnot and also took the Hannah, sixteen guns. He died in the West Indies in 1796. [NOAR, 269]


SALTONSTALL, GILBERT

CT (P)

Captain, Continental Marines


Gilbert Saltonstall was born in New London, Connecticut 27 February 1751/2. He was the son of Gurdon and Rebeckah (Wanton) Saltonstall. His bothers, Winthrop and Dudley, also served in the American Revolution. Gilbert graduated from Harvard College in 1770. Gardner W. Allen asserted that Saltonstall received his commission as captain of Marines in 1776. However, one must refer to Gilbert's own recollection of events, written to Silas Deane in London, 16 August 1783, for the complete story:

Give me leave to sketch out the Ghost of my departed Hours from that Time [early in the war] to the present. My country will be amenable I hope for the Murther of my Time, since it was in her Service the Crime was com­mitted; the Emolument if any accrued, She certainly has, for I have recd nothing during Seven Years Service. In January 1777, 1 was appointed Capt Marines in the American Navy, and was Order'd on board the Trumbull where I remained 'till '79.

On 19 July 1779, the ill-fated fleet of New England priva­teers, merchant vessels and three Continental ships-the frigate Warren, brig Diligent, and sloop Providence-departed Boston to take Majabagaduce from the British in the Penob-cot River. Saltonstall wrote further to Silas Deane:

As there was no prospect of her [Trumbull] getting to Sea, went as a Volunteer in the Penobscot Business, on my return took my old Station again.

Gilbert Saltonstall's brother, Dudley, was commodore of the expedition, with his flag on Warren. John Welsh was her captain of Marines, but Gilbert was also on board as secretary to Dudley. Councils of War on board Warren dated 27 and 29 July and 14 August 1779 were signed by him. He apparently did not serve in the landings on Banks Island or Majabaga­duce. Captain Welsh was killed in the assault of 28 July, and Lieutenant of Marines William Hamilton, also of Warren, was wounded and later died of his wounds.

Trumbull was finally gotten across the bar of the Connecti­cut River in 1779, fitted for sea at New London, was com­missioned and got to sea in 1780. On 1 June 1780, Trumbull fell in with the British letter of marque Watt and, fought one of the bitterest engagements of the war. Trumbull's captain, James Nicholson, made an excellent report of the battle. Two letters from Captain Gilbert Saltonstall to his father dated 14 and 19 June 1780, give details of the officers and crew that were not contained in Nicholson's report.

He related that David Bill, a "volunteer," was killed at the beginning of the engagement. Daniel Starr, who probably was a lieutenant of Marines, was wounded with a grape shot and died on 5 June. Both were from New London and probably were well  known to Saltonstall. Lieutenant of Marines Jabez Smith, of Groton, Connecticut, was also killed. Of the numerous enlisted personnel killed and wounded, it is not known which were Marines.

Captain Saltonstall also suffered "eleven different wounds, from my shoulder to my hip; some with buck-shot, others with the splinters of the after quarter-deck gun. I had one shot through the brim of my hat; but was not so disabled as to quit the quarter-deck till after the engagement; and am now as well as ever.-Have one buck-shot in my hip yet."

He also asserted that "the marines fired pistols during the engagement exclusive of which they fired near 1200 rounds."

Notwithstanding, Saltonstall reported to his father that the entire crew was exuberant about going back to sea. Trumbull was refitting, a recruiting rendezvous had been opened, and she expected to sail with the frigate Deane.

Saltonstall was still Trumbull's captain of Marines when she sailed on 11 August 1780. On the 29th of that month, she began a cruise of the Atlantic Coast with Deane. In Sep­tember, they captured the British brig Little William. A muster roF' compiled at the time listed William Fielding as lieutenant of Marines of Trumbull.

His account to Silas Deane is the only surviving memoir of his further service:

Order'd to Philada where remaind till July 81. left the Capes of Delaware on July 9th in four Hours were taken, after an Action of three Glasses, by the Iris formerly the Hancock, and the Monk of 20 Guns. were carried into New York. I was Parold from the Prison Ship to New London just time eno' lenoughl to see the destruction of the Town, a Scene too distressing to dwell upon. May 1st [17831 an Order from the Warr Office liberated all Prisoners from Parole.

Gilbert Saltonstall and one D. Mumford, Jr. engaged in mercantile business in New York following the war, and he wrote Deane for contacts on the Continent.

Saltonstall was married, the time and place unknown, to Harriet Babcock, by whom he had two sons. One, Gurdon, was later a professor of mathematics at the University of Alabama, and died there, leaving no issue. The second son, Gilbert, was born in 1791, married in 1814, and died at Tuscaloosa, Alabama on 6 February 1833. His progeny had a line of descent into the early 1900's.

The date and place of death of Captain Gilbert Saltonstall is unknown. [Smith, 468]

On 6 May 1782 Saltonstall witnessed the bond for Connecticut Privateer Ship Cato (Commander DANIEL TAPPAN). [NRAR, 248]


SALTONSTALL, GURDON

CT

[Naval Officer]


Gurdon Saltonstall was a resident of New London, Connecticut. He was appointed Naval Officer for the Port of New London on 19 December 1777, succeeding Jeremiah Miller. This was probably a customs type post. [NOAR, 270]


SALTONSTALL, NATHANIEL

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers



SAMPSON, GIDEON

MA

Captain, Massachusetts Navy


Nathaniel Saltonstall was a resident of New London, Connecticut. [NRAR, 370] He was in command of the Connecticut Privateer Ship Governor Trumbull on 5 April 1779, when she was captured by HM Frigate Venus (but see NOAR, 25, where the commander is listed as HENRY BILLINGS). He was later exchanged. In May 1779 he commanded the Connecticut Privateer Ship General Putnam. In the General Putnam he captured the British sloops Hunter and Polly and the snow Clinton. [NOAR, 270] On 26 May 1780 Saltonstall was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Brigantine Le Despenser. [NRAR, 370] On 7 April 1781 he captured the British ship Polly, which was sent into New London. [NOAR, 270]

Gideon Sampson was a resident of Plymouth, Massachusetts. He was commissioned as a Captain in the Massachusetts Navy on 26 July 1776 and assigned to the Massachusetts Navy Brigantine Independence. On 7 February 1777 it was reported that he was captured by HM Brig Hope. He was later exchanged. In 1777 he commanded the Massachusetts Navy Brig Hazard. In June 1780 Sampson commanded the Massachusetts Navy Ship Mars. [NOAR, 270] On 29 May 1777, a Gideon Samson, listed as living in Exeter, New Hampshire, served as a bonder for New Hampshire Privateer Sloop Wilks (Commander MENDES FILS CADET). [NRAR, 492]


SANDERS [SAUNDERS], BRADBURY

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Bradbury Sanders (or Saunders) was a resident of Cape Ann, Massachusetts. [NRAR, 229] He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Lightfoot on 22 February 1780. [NOAR, 271] He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Apollo on 14 January 1782. [NRAR, 229]


SANDERS, CILY

[See CELERY SAUNDERS]


SANDERS [SAUNDERS], DANIEL

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Daniel Sanders (Saunders) was a resident of Salem, Massachusetts. On 30 October 1780 he was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Two Brothers. [NRAR, 479; NOAR, 270]


SANDERS, ROBERT

RI

Second Lieutenant, Continental Navy


[NOAR, 270]


SANDERS, THOMAS

MD

Commander, Maryland Privateers


Thomas Sanders was a resident of Baltimore, Maryland. He was commissioned to the Maryland Privateer Brigantine Queen of France on 25 September 1779. [NRAR, 424]


SANDFORD, LAWRENCE

VA

Captain, Virginia Navy


Lawrence Sandford was a Captain in the Virginia Navy, in command of the Virginia Navy Brig Adventure, which was in service by the late summer of 1776, when she was loaded with a cargo of tobacco [NDAR, 6, 919] for a projected voyage to Dunkerque, France. [ NDAR, 6, 728] Brig Adventure was laying at Norfolk, Virginia on 1 September 1776. [Stewart, 16] Sandford evidently sailed about 6 September on [Boucher’s Fleet Cruise] and was back at York on 20 September. [NDAR, VI, 919] By 16 October 1776 Adventure was at Portsmouth, where Sandford drew sail cloth for the brig. Letters from abroad had arrived, and Adventure's destination was again changed, back to Dunkerque. Sandford was ordered to report to Stival & Sons at that port. [ NDAR, 6, 1296-1297] As sailing time drew near, Sandford approached the Virginia Navy Board and requested to know the terms of his voyage. On 18 October the Board agreed to pay him eight shillings per day plus cabin stores, and his mate six shillings per day. [ NDAR, 6, 1326] Adventure finally sailed in late October or early November 1776. Her destination had evidently been changed again, for Sandford took her to Mole St. Nicholas, St. Domingue. She probably arrived there in mid-November, delivered her cargo, and took aboard a return cargo of 11,200 pounds of gunpowder. [ NDAR, 7, 1303] Sandford sailed for home in late December 1776. On 11 January 1777 Adventure was captured by HM Frigate Roebuck and Sandford was imprisoned. [ NDAR, 7, 932 and note]


SANDS, RICHARDSON

PA

Owner, Pennsylvania Privateers


Richardson Sands was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was associated in privateering with WHITE MATLACK and JOHN IMLAY. He was associated with the following vessels:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

9/11/81

PA

Brigantine Governor Clinton (8/18)

Joseph Vansise

John Imlay, Richard Sands, White Matlack et al

Joseph Vansise, John Imlay

James Trimble [NRAR, 319]

12/15/81

PA

Brigantine Count de Grasse (6/20)

John Hall

Richardson Sands, White Matlack et al

Richardson Sands, John Hall

James Trimble [NRAR, 260]


SANFORD, JOHN

VA

Commander, Virginia Privateers


John Sanford was commissioned to the Virginia Privateer Sloop St. Patrick on 12 March 1781. [NRAR, 465] In NOAR, 271, the vessel and the man are said to be from Maryland.


SANFORD, WILLIAM

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


William Sanford was a resident of Falmouth, Massachusetts [Maine]. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Boat Success on 8 May 1782, a boat which he owned. [NRAR, 467]

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

5/8/82

MA

Boat Success (-/10)

William Sanford

William Sanford

William Sanford, Joseph Pease, Samuel Gifford

Joseph Palmer, Edward Nye [NRAR, 467]


SANSUM, JOHN

PA

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


John Sansum was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [NRAR, 373] He was born about 1741.  [NOAR, 271] Sansum was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Schooner Liberty on 2 October 1782, a vessel of which he was part owner. [NRAR, 373] Others associated in privateering with Sansum were GEORGE MONK and THOMAS BEE.

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

10/2/82

PA

Schooner Liberty (/6)

John Sansum

John Sansum, George Monk

Thomas Bee, John Sansum

James Trimble, George Monk [NRAR, 373]


SARGEANT [SERJEANT], WILLIAM H.

PA

Commander, Virginia Privateers

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


William H. Sargeant [Serjeant] was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, [NRAR, 254, 400] born about 1753. [NOAR, 271] He was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Ship Columbia on 22 June 1781. [NRAR, 254] He was commissioned, again, to the Virginia Privateer Ship Nancy on 2 April 1782. [NRAR, 400]


SARGENT, DANIEL

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers

Daniel Sargent was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was associated in privateering with DANIEL HUBBARD, EBENEZER PARSONS, ROBERT DAVIS, MOSES PIKE, WINTHROP SARGENT, JOSIAH BATCHELDER, JOHN HALE, EBENEZER LANE, STEPHEN HIGGINSON, WILLIAM PARSONS, STEPHEN GORHAM, SAMUEL BROWN, JOSHUA BLANCHARD, JR., JOSHUA BLANCHARD, JOHN BABSON, DANIEL ROGERS  Vessels associated with Sargent were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

9/22/80

MA

Schooner Peacock (4/16)

Sargent Smith

Daniel Sargent

Sargent Smith, Ebenezer Parsons, Daniel Sargent

Samuel Stimpson, Nehemiah Somes [NRAR, 411]

9/22/80

MA

Schooner Wasp (4/16)

Enoch Pike

Daniel Sargent

Enoch Pike, Ebenezer Parsons, Daniel Sargent

Samuel Stimpson, Nehemiah Somes [NRAR, 490]

5/4/81

MA

Schooner Peacock (4/10)

Elias Davis

Daniel Sargent et al

Elias Davis, Stephen Higginson, Daniel Sargent

William Parsons, John G. Rogers [NRAR, 412]

5/24/81

MA

Ship Robin Hood (14/60)

Sargent Smith

Stephen Higginson, Daniel Sargent

Sargent Smith, Stephen Higginson, Daniel Sargent

Moses Hale, William Parsons [NRAR, 445]

5/29/81

MA

Brigantine Race Horse (6/15)

Nathaniel Thayer

Daniel Sargent et al

Nathaniel Thayer, Daniel Sargent, Ebenezer Lane

Tristram Coffin, Samuel Daggett [NRAR, 425]

10/9/81

MA

Schooner Peacock (4/15)

Alexander Mackay

Daniel Sargent et al

Alexander Mackay, Daniel Sargent, William Parsons

Thomas Simmons, William Ellison [NRAR, 412]

10/9/81

MA

Brigantine Ranger (8/15)

Thomas Simmons

Daniel Sargent et al

Thomas Simmons, Daniel Sargent, Samuel Brown

Mungo Mackay, Samuel Barber [NRAR, 430]

12/6/81

MA

Brig Favourite (10/20)

Elias Davis

Daniel Sargent et al

Elias Davis, Daniel Sargent, Moses Pike

John G. Rogers, Richard Littlefield [NRAR, 291]

4/16/82

MA

Brigantine Constant (4/12)

Cornelius Fellows

Daniel Hubbard, Daniel Sargent et al

Cornelius Fellows, Daniel Sargent, Robert Davis

Jonathan Harrington, Samson Reed [NRAR, 259]

7/31/82

MA

Brig Panther (6/15)

George Lane

Ebenezer Lane, Daniel Sargent et al

George Lane, Daniel Sargent, Ebenezer Lane

Jonathan Oakes, Thomas Perkins [NRAR, 409]

11/21/82

MA

Ship Favourite (6/20)

Nathaniel Sargent

Daniel Sargent et al

Nathaniel Sargent, Winthrop Sargent

Joseph Saunders, James Prentis [NRAR, 291]

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

11/21/80

MA

Sloop Revenge (4/14)

Archibald Rainey

Joshua Blanchard, Jr.

Archibald Rainey, Daniel Sargent, Joshua Blanchard, Jr.

Jonathan Greenleaf, Samuel Cotesworthy, Jr. [NRAR, 440]

1/6/81

MA

Brigantine Delight (8/15)

Moses Hale

Eben Parsons et al

Moses Hale, Daniel Sargent, Eben Parsons

Isaac Pierce, David Morey [NRAR, 266]

4/9/81

MA

Brigantine Ruby (4/15)

Benjamin Webber

John Babson, Daniel Rogers et al

Benjamin Webber, Daniel Sargent, Ebenezer Lane

Lewis Carnes, Thomas Carnes [NRAR, 449]

5/2/81

MA

Sloop Fish Hawk (6/40)

Samuel Foster

Josiah Batcheldor et al

Samuel Foster, Daniel Sargent, John Hale

Tristram Coffin, David Cutler [NRAR, 293]

6/28/81

MA

Sloop Revenge (4/14)

Ezekiel Burroughs

Joshua Blanchard

Ezekiel Burroughs, Daniel Sargent, Joshua Blanchard, Jr.

Jonathan Amory, James Dodge [NRAR, 441]

7/14/81

MA

Brigantine Ranger (8/20)

Job Knight

Stephen Higginson et al

Job Knight, Daniel Sargent, Stephen Gorham

George Ridgway, Joseph Daniels [NRAR, 430]

7/31/82

MA

Brig Elizabeth (6/15)

Ichabod Clarke

Job Prince, Jr. et al

Ichabod Clarke, Daniel Sargent, Job Prince, jr.

Job Prince, Samuel Holbrook, Jr. [NRAR, 281]

As witness:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

11/29/80

MA

Brigantine Betsey (4/9)

Peter Wells

Stephen Higginson

Peter Wells, Stephen Higginson, John Coffin Jones

Daniel Sargent, George Burroughs [NRAR, 236]

12/13/82

MA

Ship Apollo (6/25)

Alexander Mackay

Thomas Dennie et al

Alexander Mackay, Thomas Dennie, Simeon Mayo

Daniel Sargent, Lendall Pitts [NRAR, 229]


SARGENT, JOHN OSBORNE

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


John Osborne Sergent was a resident of Gloucester, Massachusetts. He was commissioned on 11 January 1782 to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Gloucester Packet. [NRAR, 318]


SARGENT, NATHANIEL

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Nathaniel Sargent was a resident of Cape Ann, Massachusetts. He was commissioned on 7 January 1779 to the Massachusetts Privateer Sloop Union. On 7 October 1779 he was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Wasp. [NOAR, 271] Sargent was next commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Eagle, on 8 November 1780. [NRAR, 279] Another commission was given to Sargent, on 16 April 1781, to the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Delight. [NRAR, 266] Sargent, now listing his residence as Gloucester, Massachusetts, was next commissioned, on 21 November 1782, to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Favourite. [NRAR, 291]


SARGENT, PAUL DUDLEY

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Paul Dudley Sargent was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. Sargent was a part owner of the Massachusetts Privateer Sloop Yankee (Commander HENRY JOHNSON), commissioned 23 May 1776. Other owners were Michael Jackson, Joseph Williams, and Nathaniel Crafts (Watertown, Massachusetts). [NDAR, IV, 1389 and note; V, 215] On 7 August 1782 Sargent served as a witness to the bond of Massachusetts Privateer Ship St. Mary’s Packet (Commander JOHN LEACH, JR.). [NRAR, 464] Associated with Sargent in privateering was THOMAS ADAMS and DANIEL MARTIN. Vessels associated with Sargent were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

9/12/77

MA

Ship Cumberland (20/180)

James Collins

Paul Dudley Sargent et al

James Collins, Paul Dudley Sargent, Nathaniel Crafts, Job Prince

Elisha Turner, Thomas Snowden, Nathaniel Barber [Allen, MPR, 106]

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

4/25/77

MA

Schooner Buckram (8/45)

William Morony

Daniel Martin, Thomas Adams

William Morony, Thomas Adams, Paul Dudlet Sargent

Timothy Foster [NDAR, VIII, 417-418; Allen, MPR, 88]


SARGENT, WINTHROP

MA

Agent, Continental Army Squadron (Boston)

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Winthrop Sargent was a resident of Cape Ann or Gloucester, Massachusetts. He acted as an agent for Washington’s Fleet (the Continental Army Squadron at Boston). On 18 October 1776 he was called upon by the Continental Congress to account with the Marine Committee for prizes he handled. [NRAR, 23-24] On 21 March 1777 Congress appointed three Commissioners to settle these accounts and notified Sargent. [NRAR, 40] He was associated in privateering with DANIEL SARGENT, DAVID PEARCE, and WILLIAM SHATTUCK. Vessels associated with Sargent were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

10/11/80

MA

Brig General Mercer (10/25)

Joseph Foster

Winthrop Sargent

Joseph Foster, Winthrop Sargent, William Pearson

Isaac Proctor, Nathaniel Warner [NRAR, 312]

12/28/80

MA

Ship Gloucester Packet (16/45)

John Beach

Winthrop Sargent et al

John Beach, Winthrop Sargent, David Pearce

John Stevens Ellery, Joseph Allen [NRAR, 317]

1/9/81

MA

Ship Polly (20/35)

William Coas

Winthrop Sargent

William Coas, Winthrop Sargent, David Pearce

Daniel Rogers, James Pearson, Jr. [NRAR, 417]

2/20/81

MA

Ship Polley (18/30)

Joseph Foster

Winthrop Sargent et al

Joseph Foster, David Pearce, Winthrop Sargent

David Plumer [NRAR, 417]

7/81

MA

Ship General Starke (22/100)

William Coas

Winthrop Sargent et al

William Coas, Winthrop Sargent, David Pearce

John Stevens Ellery, John Beach [NRAR, 314]

1/11/82

MA

Ship Gloucester Packet (16/40)

John Osborne Sargent

Winthrop Sargent et al

John Osborne Sargent, David Pearce, Winthrop Sargent

John Stevens Ellery [NRAR, 318]

2/21/82

MA

Ship Polly (16/25)

Isaac Lee

Winthrop Sargent et al

Isaac Lee, Winthrop Sargent, David Pearce

John Stevens Ellery [NRAR, 418]

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

10/11/81

MA

Sloop General Green (8/25)

Isaiah Simmons

William Shattuck et al

Isaiah Simmons, William Shattuck, Winthrop Sargent

Stephen H. Gray, Thomas H. Perkins [NRAR, 310]

11/21/82

MA

Ship Favourite (6/20)

Nathaniel Sargent

Daniel Sargent et al

Nathaniel Sargent, Winthrop Sargent

Joseph Saunders, James Prentis [NRAR, 291]


SASPORTAS & LE BOEUF

PA

Owners, Pennsylvania Privateers


“Sasportas & Le Boeuf” of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is listed as the owner of a Pennsylvania privateer. There are no associates to this firm. Vessels associated with “Sasportas & Le Boeuf” were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

3/12/82

PA

Brigantine Two Rachels (8/20)

Joseph Buisson

Sasportas & Le Boeuf

Sasportas & Le Boeuf, Joseph Buisson

James Trimble [NRAR, 480]


SAUNDERS, BRADBURY

[See BRADBURY SANDERS]


SAUNDERS [SANDERS], CELERY [CILY]

VA

Captain, Virginia Navy


Celey Saunders was born about 1740 near Dumfries, Virginia. [Stewart, 244-245] [Cily Sanders] He was commissioned as a Captain in the Virginia Navy on 1 April 1776 and given command of a galley in the Rappahannock River (Virginia Navy Galley Lewis). On 12 September 1776 he was ordered to transport troops to New York, along with other Virginia commanders. John Hawkins was paid £9.12 for supplying whiskey for the galley. [NOAR, 271]


SAUNDERS, DANIEL

[See DANIEL SANDERS]


SAUNDERS, JOSEPH H.

VA

Lieutenant, Virginia Navy


Joseph H. Saunders was born in 1757. He was a Lieutenant in the Virginia Navy. Saunders died in 1833. [NOAR, 271]


SAUNDERS, RICHARD

VA

Midshipman, Virginia Navy


Richard Saunders served as a Midshipman in the Virginia Navy. [NOAR, 271]


SAUNDERS, THOMAS

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Thomas Saunders was a resident of Cape Ann, Massachusetts. He was commissioned, on 30 March 1779, [NOAR, 271] to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Tryal. [NOAR, 272] He was again commissioned, on 28 May 1781, to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Swift. [NRAR, 471] On 2 March 1782 he was commissioned to the Maryland Privateer Schooner Perseverance. [NOAR, 272]


SAUNDERS, WILLIAM

VA

Captain, Virginia Navy


William Saunders was commissioned as a [First] Lieutenant in the Virginia Navy and assigned to a galley on the Rappahannock River (the Lewis), to be commanded by Captain CELERY SAUNDERS. [NOAR, 272] Virginia Navy Schooner Adventure was commissioned on 8 June 1776, when William Saunders was appointed as her master. [NDAR, V, 431] Saunders had previously served as First Lieutenant on a galley, from 1 April 1776. [NDAR, IV, 621] On 17 June RICHARD LIGHTBOURNE was appointed as Mate on the Adventure. [NDAR, V, 593-594 and 594 note] Both Saunders and Lightbourne were issued commissions on 20 July 1776, as Captain and Lieutenant, respectively, by the Virginia Council of Safety. [NDAR, V, 1164] On 27 July Saunders drew £77.3.0 for his schooner's payroll from date of enlistment to 25 July. [NDAR, V, 1249] Adventure was at Hobb's Hole on 19 August 1776, when Saunders was ordered to cruise about the Virginia Capes to annoy the enemy, and then return to York to refit when the schooner was foul. The Virginia Navy Board also wished to inspect the schooner. [NDAR, Vi, 239] Adventure was apparently fitting out at York by 20 September 1776, when Saunders drew a speaking trumpet, hour glass, and bunting from the storekeeper. [NDAR, VI, 919-920] He drew cordage and slops on 12 October 1776. [NDAR, VI, 1242, 1242-1243] The Council of Safety now had more interesting employment for the Adventure. On 29 November 1776, the Council ordered the Virginia Navy Board to send the schooner to either St. Eustatia or Martinique, consigned to the agents (Van Bibber; Harrison) there. {NDAR, VII, 328] A cargo of flour was procured and a cover letter written on 30 November. [NDAR, VII, 338] Nothing is known of this voyage, whether it took place or not, or what happened to the Adventure. Saunders was in Virginia on 18 April 1777, when he was ordered to take command of the galley Manley. [NDAR, VII, 369. Misidentified in NOAR, 272, as the Hanley.]


SAWYER, THOMAS

CT

Master, Connecticut Privateers


Thomas Sawyer was appointed Master on the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Revenge (Commander JOSEPH CONKLING), commissioned 23 October 1776. [NRAR, 439; NDAR, VI, 1004-1005 and 1005 note; VII, 995-997] He was on the entire time of her first cruise, 22 January 1777-22 May 1777, and for her second cruise, perhaps July-September 1777. Two actions were fought, one resulting in the loss of HM Schooner Tender Admiral Parker, on 23 September. [see Revenge]


SCOTT, JOHN


SCOVELL [SCOVEL, SCOFIELD], DANIEL

CT

Captain, Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Daniel Scovell (Scovel or Scofield) was a native of Farmington, Connecticut. [Middlebrook, MCR, 55] He was in service in early 1777, when he was ordered to Fort Ticonderoga on 18 February 1777, with his sailors, to place himself under Colonel Anthony Wayne's command until the lakes opened. [NDAR, 7, 1229] He was at Fort Ticonderoga on 26 June 1777, in command of Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron Sloop Enterprise. [NDAR, 9, 174] During the British attack on Fort Ticonderoga on 5 July the Enterprise, being used as a provision vessel, was escorted to Skenesborough. She was burned there on 6 July 1776. [NDAR, 9, 225] Scovell was commissioned as commander of the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Beaver on 4 March 1780, with twelve cannon and seventy men, sailing for John Broome & Co. of Hartford. [NRAR, 233] On 22 March the Beaver was captured by HM Frigate Galatea and HM Cutter Tender Retaliation. Scovell was taken to New York and placed on parole on 29 March. [Middlebrook, MCR, 55-60]  Soon after, on 18 July 1780, he was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Right and Justice, owned by John Riley and John Wright of Wethersfield. [NRAR, 444] On 12 September 1780 the Right and Justice captured the British sloop Lark. [NOAR, 273] Scovell was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Brigantine Deane on 15 March 1781, owned by Barnabas Deane & Co. [NRAR, 263] In this vessel he captured sloop Sophia, an unnamed sloop, brig Jenny, brig Three Sisters, and another brig Jenny between April and July 1781. In October 1781 the Deane was captured and Scovell was sent to a prison ship at New York for the second time. [Middlebrook, MCR, II, 66-67]


SCOVELL [SCOVEL] NOAH

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Noah Scovell [Scovel] was commissioned as commander of the Connecticut Privateer Brigantine Marshall on 6 March 1783. Scovell was described as as age 25, 5′11′′ tall, with a light complexion, dark hair and a slender build. On the following cruise the brigantine Hope was captured. She was among the very last prizes captured during the war. [see Marshall]


SCRANTON, JOHN G.

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


John G. Scranton was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. [NRAR, 334] Scranton was commissioned as a Lieutenant in the Continental Navy in 1776. On 29 November 1780 he was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Sloop Dolphin. [NRAR, 272; Allen, Massachusetts Privateers of the Revolution, 118] He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Hero on 10 September 1781. [NRAR, 334, Allen, Massachusetts Privateers of the Revolution, 175] On 21 January 1782 Hero fell in with the British sloop Shuldham (Walter Symonds), with a cargo of dry goods, and drove her into Norwalk, Connecticut. She was seized there by Major Benjamin Tallmadge and other soldiers of the Continental Army.  Although Scranton made application to the Maritime Court for part of the prize money, the prize was condemned to Tallmadge on 4 April 1780. [Middlebrook, Maritime Connecticut During The Revolution, II, 121-122] Hero was re-commissioned on 7 August 1782, again under Scranton. [NRAR, 335; Allen, Massachusetts Privateers of the Revolution, 176] Scranton was again commissioned to the sloop Dolphin on 27 November 1782. [Allen, Massachusetts Privateers of the Revolution, 119]


SEABURY, BENJAMIN

RI

Second Lieutenant, Continental Navy

Second Lieutenant, Rhode Island Navy

Benjamin Seabury was appointed as a Second Lieutenant in the Rhode Island Navy on 12 June 1775 and assigned to the Rhode Island Navy Sloop Katy (Commodore ABRAHAM WHIPPLE). [NDAR, I, 664-665]


SEAMAN [SEAMON], ISAAC

Captain, Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron

Captain, Continental Army Lake George Squadron


Isaac Seaman was in command of the Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron Schooner Revenge on 17 August 1776, anchored at Crown Point. [NDAR, 6, 224] When General Arnold ordered Revenge and Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron Schooner Liberty (Captain LEONARD PREMIERE) to patrol down the Lake, Premiere got underway, firing signal guns. Seaman was ashore at the time. Commodore JACOBUS WYNKOOP, in the Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron Schooner Royal George, believed the two schooners were defecting to the British, and fired a swivel gun to stop them. Royal Savage's boat fetched Premiere aboard, and he informed Wynkoop he was under orders. This affair precipatated Wynkoop's suspension from command. Later in the day, the Liberty and Revenge sailed on patrol. [NDAR, 6, 215, 215, 215, 216, 216-217, 317-322] Seaman was ordered by General Schuyler, on 18 February 1777, to proceed to Fort Ticonderoga with his sailors, and put himself under Colonel Anthony Wayne's command until the lakes opened. [NDAR, 7, 1229] Schuyler ordered him to go to Fish Kill on 24 March 1777 and recruit a company of sailors, forty-nine in all, including two lieutenants and a master. The officers were to draw the same rations as regular Navy officers. [NDAR, 8, 188] He was at Fort George on 26 June 1777, in the capacity of Captain, but is not shown as assigned to any particular vessel. [NDAR, 9, 174]


SEARS, EZRA


Surgeon, Continental Navy


Doctor Ezra Sears enlisted aboard the Continental Navy Ship Columbus (HOYSTEED HACKER) at Providence, Rhode Island, on 20 February 1777, as Surgeon. [NDAR, "Shipping Articles for the Continental Navy Ship Columbus," 8, 118-120]


SEARS, ISAAC

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Isaac Sears was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts.  He was associated with the following privateers as an owner or bonder:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

7/25/77

CT

Brigantine General Washington (18/130)

William Rogers

Isaac Sears, Samuel Broome, Christopher Leffingwell, Jeremiah Platt, John Broome

William Rogers, Jeremiah Platt, John Broome

Samuel Talcott, Jr., Ebenezer Platt [NRAR, 314]

12/31/77

MA

Sloop Independence (10/55)

Peter Pollard

Isaac Sears, Paschal N. Smith

Peter Pollard, Isaac Sears, Paschal Nelson Smith

[Allen, MPR, 186]

4/6/78

CT

Ship General McDougall (10/30)

Joseph Jauncey

Paschal N. Smith, Isaac Sears, Benedict Arnold, Christopher Leffingwell, Samuel Broome, John Broome, Jeremiah Platt

Joseph Jauncey, Jeremiah Platt, John Broome

Margaret V. Vanderspiegel, Ebenezer Platt [NRAR, 311]

5/11/78

MA

Brigantine General Arnold (20/120)

James Magee

Isaac Sears, Paschal N. Smith

James Magee, Isaac Sears, Paschal N. Smith

Eliakim Raymond, Joseph Skillin [NRAR, 308]

5/11/78

CT

Ship Mars (22/130)

Gilbert Ash

Isaac Sears, Samuel Broome, John Broome

Gilbert Ash, Isaac Sears, John Broome

Eliakim Raymond, Joseph Skillin [NRAR, 385]

1/12/79

MA

Sloop Independence (4/10)

Francis Brown

Isaac Sears et al

Francis Brown, Isaac Sears, Samuel Broome

[Allen, MPR, 187]

5/13/79

MA

Brigantine Amsterdam (10/30)

James Magee

Paschal Nelson Smith, Isaac Sears

James Magee, Leonard Jarvis, Paschal Nelson Smith

Daniel Denison Rogers, James Thwing, Jr. [Allen, MPR,74]

2/22/80

MA

Brigantine Amsterdam

James Magee

Isaac Sears, Paschal Nelson Smith

 

[Allen, MPR,74]

8/20/81

MA

Sloop Hermione (6/12)

Silas Rand

Isaac Sears et al

Silas Rand, Paschal N. Smith, Ebenezer Woodward

Eliakim Raymond, George Scott [NRAR, 333]

5/11/82

MA

Lugger Dreadnought (2/35)

Amos Potter

Isaac Sears et al

Amos Potter, Isaac Sears, Paschal N. Smith

Eliakim Raymond, George Scott [NRAR, 277]

5/11/82

MA

Schooner Poppet (4/10)

Thomas Barnard

Isaac Sears et al

Thomas Barnard, Isaac Sears, Paschal N. Smith

Isaac Peirce, John Dall [NRAR, 419]

9/10/82

MA

Brig Patty (8/20)

William Haydon

Sears & Smith

William Haydon, Leonard Jarvis, Joseph Russell

James Waldo, John Hichborn [NRAR, 411]

10/6/82

MA

Brigantine Firebrand (10/35)

Phoenix Frazier

Isaac Sears, Paschal Nelson Smith

Phoenix Frazier, Isaac Sears, Paschal N. Smith

Eliakim Raymond, George Scott [NRAR, 293]

12/3/82

MA

Sloop Assurance (14/75)

David Porter

Isaac Sears et al

David Porter, Isaac Sears, Paschal N. Smith

Eliakim Raymond, George Scott [NRAR, 230]

12/3/82

MA

Ship Gustavus (16/70)

James Magee

Isaac Sears et al

James Magee, Isaac Sears, Paschal N. Smith

Eliakim Raymond, George Scott [NRAR, 323]

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

12/28/80

MA

Brigantine Hannah (8/18)

Samuel Gill

Leonard Jarvis et al

Samuel Gill, Leonard Jarvis, Isaac Sears

Philip Jarvis, John Hichborn [NRAR, 324]

5/25/82

MA

Schooner Industry (4/12)

Charles Cole

Ebenezer Woodward et al

Charles Cole, Ebenezer Woodward, Isaac Sears

William Doggett, John McClure [NRAR, 352]

7/4/82

MA

Brigantine Iris (8/30)

Alexander Smiley

James Jarvis

Alexander Smiley, M. M. Hays, Isaac Sears

S. Blagge, Philip Howland [NRAR, 353]


SELDEN, JOSEPH

VA

[Lieutenant, Virginia Navy]


In 1782, presumably after May 1782 [See JOHN HARDYMAN], there was a Lieutenant Selden recruiting for the Virginia Navy Ship Cormorant (Captain JAMES MAXWELL), then lying at Hampton, Virginia. [Stewart, 122] It is not clear whether this was Joseph Selden or Samuel Selden. [Stewart, 245] It is also not clear whether he was a naval Lieutenant or a Lieutenant of Marines. [Stewart, 122] Selden was presumably in service until the Cormorant was ordered sold in October 1782. [Cross, 79; Stewart, 126]


SELDEN, SAMUEL

VA

See JOSEPH SELDEN.


SELLERS, JAMES

MA

Second Lieutenant, Continental Navy


On 31 May "Capt" James Sellers of Dartmouth, Massachusetts, was appointed as Third Lieutenant in the Continental Navy on one of the new Continental frigates in Rhode Island, by the Rhode Island Frigate Committee, "on his Inlisting 12 good Seaman to go in the Ships within 20 Days." [NDAR, V, 315] On 20 June 1776 Sellers was promoted to Second Lieutenant, and assigned to Continental Navy Ship Warren (Captain JOHN BURROUGHS HOPKINS). [NDAR, V, 637-638] Sellers was recommended for commissioning to the Continental Congress by the Marine Committee on 1 July 1776. [NDAR. V, 856 and note] Sellers served without any notable contribution aboard the Warren until 11 February 1776, when he was one of ten discontented officers to sign a letter of accusation against Captain Hopkins and Commodore ESEK HOPKINS. The letter was addressed to a Massachusetts attorney, Robert Treat Paine. Paine evidently advised the officers to consult the Marine Committee. [NDAR, VII, 1166-1168 and 1168 note] On 25 February Sellers drew up a statement condemning Commodore Hopkins, which was to be taken to Philadelphia by the leader of the malcontents, Captain of Marines JOHN GRANNIS. [NDAR, VII, 1265 and note] By 18 March 1776 Hopkins learned of the discontent [NDAR, VIII, 142-144 and 144 note] and, by 24 March, Grannis was testifying before the Marine Committee. [NDAR, VIII, 189-192] Sellers evidently rode out the ensuing turmoil before Hopkins was suspended by Congress on 25 March.


SERJEANT, WILLIAM H.

[See WILLIAM H. SARGEANT]


SEYMOUR, THOMAS

PA

Commodore, Pennsylvania Navy


Appointed 26 September 1776, discharged because of age and sickness 6 September 1777 [Jackson, 334]


SHARP, JOHN

MD

Third Mate [Lieutenant], Maryland Privateers


John Sharp was a resident of Baltimore, Maryland in 1776. He was appointed as Second Mate (or Second Lieutenant) on the Maryland Privateer Sloop Baltimore Hero (Commander THOMAS WATERS) on 16 June 1776. A lengthy voyage to the West Indies followed. [see Baltimore Hero]


SHAW, DANIEL

NY

First Lieutenant, Continental Navy

Commander, New York Privateers


Daniel Shaw was commissioned as commander of the New York Privateer Sloop Harlequin on 2 August 1776. [NDAR, VI, 20 and note] He was commissioned as First Lieutenant in the Continental Navy by 25 July 1777, [NDAR IX, 333-334] and was assigned to the Continental Navy Ship Congress (Captain THOMAS GRENNELL). Shaw was appointed by Grennell and had taken up his duties aboard the Congress on 10 March 1777. [NDAR, IX, 266 and note] After 4 July 1777 he took command of the Continental Army Galley Shark, on the upper Hudson River. [NDAR, IX, 215 and note] Shaw was commissioned on 17 July 1777. [NDAR, IX, 294] He presumably was still in command of the Shark during the action at Fort Montgomery, New York, on 7 October 1777, when the American squadron, including the Shark and the Congress, was burned to prevent capture.


SHAW, SAMUEL

[PA]/ (P)

Captain, Continental Marines


Killed in action 7 March 1778, on the Randolph.


SHAW, SAMUEL

Midshipman, Continental Navy


Samuel Shaw of Bridgewater, Massachusetts, was appointed as a Midshipman in the Continental Navy by the Rhode Island Frigate Committee on 29 May 1776, and assigned to the "Largest Ship," which became the Continental Navy Ship Warren (Captain JOHN BURROUGHS HOPKINS). [NDAR, V, 294] Shaw's one notable contribution occurred on 11 February 1776, when he was one of ten discontented officers to sign a letter of accusation against Captain Hopkins and Commodore ESEK HOPKINS. The letter was addressed to a Massachusetts attorney, Robert Treat Paine. Paine evidently advised the officers to consult the Marine Committee. [NDAR, VII, 1166-1168 and 1168 note] On 26 February Sellers drew up a statement condemning Commodore Hopkins, which was to be taken to Philadelphia by the leader of the malcontents, Captain of Marines JOHN GRANNIS. [NDAR, VII, 1276-1277] By 18 March 1776 Hopkins learned of the discontent [NDAR, VIII, 142-144 and 144 note] Shaw was among the three who recanted their testimony before Hopkins, his statement being dated 14 March 1776. Commodore Hopkins commented about Shaw and the other two  that they "know but little, and are worth less as Sailors." [NDAR, VIII, 142-144 and 144 note]


SHALER, TIMOTHY

Commander, New Jersey Privateers


Timothy Shaler of Gloucester, New Jersey, was commissioned to the New Jersey Privateer Boat Chance on 20 March 1778. [NRAR, 249]


SHATTUCK, JOHN

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


John Shattuck’s normal residence was Boston, Massachusetts. He was usually associated with WILLIAM SHATTUCK in privateering. Vessels associated with Shattuck were:

As owner:


Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

9/4/79

MA

Brigantine Becca (8/)

John Willson

William and John Shattuck

John Willson, William Shattuck, John Shattuck

[Allen, MPR, 78]

4/14/81

MA

Ship Belisarius (20/200)

James Munro

William and John Shattuck

James Munro, William Shattuck, John Shattuck

[NRAR, 234; Allen, MPR, 79]


SHATTUCK, WILLIAM

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


William Shattuck’s normal residence was Boston, Massachusetts. He was one of the owners of the second Massachusetts and American privateer of the Revolution, schooner Boston Revenge. [NDAR, II, 1316] Vessels associated with Shattuck were:

As owner:


Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

12/7/75

MA

Schooner Boston Revenge

Stephen Mascoll

Thomas Adams, Stephen Mascoll, William Shattuck

Thomas Adams, Stephen Mascoll, William Shattuck

John Pickering, Timothy Pickering [NDAR, II, 1316]

8/8/76

MA

Schooner Independence (4/35)

John Gill

Thomas Adams, Paul Dudley Sargent, William Shattuck

John Gill, Paul Dudley Sargent, Thomas Adams

Gustavus Fellows, John Marston [Allen, MPR, 185]

6/12/77

MA

Schooner Charming Sally (4/15)

Joseph Tilden

William Shattuck

 

[Allen, MPR, 98]

8/26/77

MA

Schooner Charming Sally (4/25)

William Briggs

William Shattuck et al

William Briggs, Alexander Rose (SC), William Shattuck, Abraham Livingston (NY)

[Allen, MPR, 98]

12/31/77

MA

Brigantine Charming Sally (4/10)

Thomas Haws

William Shattuck et al

Thomas Haws, William Shattuck, William Dall

[Allen, MPR, 98]

2/26/78

MA

Schooner Batchelor (8/40)

John Hays

William Shattuck et al

John Hays, William Shattuck, John Shattuck

[Allen, MPR, 77]

9/4/79

MA

Brigantine Becca (8/)

John Willson

William and John Shattuck

John Willson, William Shattuck, John Shattuck

[Allen, MPR, 78]

4/14/81

MA

Ship Belisarius (20/200)

James Munro

William and John Shattuck

James Munro, William Shattuck, John Shattuck

[NRAR, 234; Allen, MPR, 79]

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

6/9/77

MA

Schooner Cleora (4/14)

Richard Ellinwood

Thomas Adams

Richard Ellinwood, Thomas Adams, William Shattuck

[Allen, MPR, 100]

4/14/81

MA

Ship Essex (20/150)

John Cathcart

Jonathan Jackson, Joseph Lee

John Cathcart, William Creed, William Shattuck

[NRAR, 283]


SHEILD, JOHN

[See SHIELDS, JOHN]


SHELDON, PARDON

RI

Commander, Rhode Island Privateers


Sheldon Pardon was born in 1739 in Providence, Rhode Island. He sailed as a merchant captain before the war, for the Browns of Providence. Sheldon may have been one of the participants in the Gaspee affair in 1773. [http://www.gaspee.org/PardonSheldon.html] Rhode Island Privateer [unknown] Adventure was commissioned on 10 May 1780 under Sheldon. Her owner was listed as John Brown. [Sheffield, 61] Sheldon continued in the merchant service after the war and died 3 February 1838. [http://www.gaspee.org/PardonSheldon.html]


SHEPWELL, ROBERT

See SHEWELL, ROBERT


SHERBURNE, SAMUEL

NH

Owner, New Hampshire Privateers


Samuel Sherburne of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, was associated with the following privateers:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

9/2/77

NH

Schooner McClary

Joshua Stackpole

Samuel Sherburne

 

Morris Hern; John Seaward [NRAR, 381]

3/30/82

NH

Lugger (2/10)

John Matthews

Spence Sherburne, John Matthews, Keith Spence, Robert Parker

 

George Gains, Joshua Bickford [NRAR, 238]

7/30/81

NH

Sloop (6/35)

Thomas Roache

Keith Spence, Samuel Sherburne, Thomas Roache

 

George Gains, Thomas Sherburne [NRAR, 322]

10/12/81

NH

Brigantine (4/30)

Timothy Mountford

Keith Spence, Samuel Sherburne, Timothy Mountford

 

William Bond, John Parker [NRAR, 470]

6/13/82

NH

Cutter (5/20)

John Tibbets

Spence Sherburne, John Tibbets, Thomas Thompson

 

Charles Roberts, Bartholomew Goodwin [NRAR, 470]


SHERER, GILBERT

Captain, Continental Army Lake George Squadron


Gilbert Sherer is shown as being at Fort George on 26 June 1777, but not assigned to a particular vessel. [NDAR, 9, 174]


SHERMAN, THOMAS

SC

Commander, South Carolina Privateers


Thomas Sherman was in command of South Carolina Privateer Ship Liberty in 1777. [Coker, 300]


SHERWOOD, HUGH

MD

Commander, Maryland Privateers


Hugh Sherwood, possibly a native of Talbot County, Maryland, was commissioned to the Maryland Privateer Schooner Oxford on 23 May 1780. [see Oxford]


SHEWELL [SHEPWELL], ROBERT

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


Robert Shewell or Shepwell [Claghorn, 278] was commissioned on 10 July 1778 to command the Pennsylvania Privateer Brig Fayette, of fourteen guns and sixty men. [Claghorn, 278] He was later commissioned, on 12 January 1782, to the Pennsylvania Privateer Ship Van Tromp, with ten guns and forty-five men. Shewell listed his residence as Philadelphia, and was a part-owner of the Van Tromp. [NRAR, 484]


SHIELDS [SHEILD], JOHN

VA

Lieutenant, Virginia Marines


John Shields was commissioned as a Lieutenant of Marines in the Virginia Marines on 25 November 1776. [NOAR, 278] Stewart, 246, has two entries: one for John Sheild, a Lieutenant of Marines on 23 November 1776; the other for John Shields, a Captain of Marines who died before 1784. [These are surely the same man].


SHOEMAKER, JOSEPH

PA (P/A)

Captain, Continental Marines


A native of the Philadelphia area and a member with SAMUEL NICHOLAS of the Fox Hunting Club, Shoemaker was appointed as a Captain of Marines in late November or early December 1775, and assigned to Continental Navy Ship Columbus (ABRAHAM WHIPPLE) by 30 December 1775 (perhaps earlier). He participated in the New Providence Expedition and the Battle off Block Island. Shoemaker resigned to Whipple in April 1776 [NDAR, "Commodore Esek Hopkins to the Continental Marine Committee," 7, 1200] (but was carried on the muster roll as a deserter [NDAR, "Muster Roll of the Men and Officers belonging to the Ship Columbus from the time of her being put in Commission to the fourteenth day of November 1776," 7, 142-154]).  Shoemaker received pay, but not rations, until his return to Philadelphia on 2 May 1776. Possibly he left the ship without permission. It may be presumed that Captain Shoemaker was one of the sources of the complaints against Whipple that led to the latter's investigation by the Continental Congress. Shoemaker was succeeded aboard the Columbus by MATTHEW PARKE. [NDAR, "Commodore Esek Hopkins to the Continental Marine Committee," 7, 1200]


SIGOURNEY, CHARLES

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Charles Sigourney was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was associated in privateering with WILLIAM FOSTER, JACOB WILLIAMS, NEHEMIAH SOMES and JAMES FOSTER CANDY. Vessels associated with Sigourney were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

10/15/76

MA

Sloop Oliver Cromwell (10/60)

John Tiley

Charles Sigourney et al

Charles Sigourney, William Foster

[Allen, MPR, 229-230]

10/13/77

MA

Brig Active (12/70)

John Foster Williams

Jacob Williams, Nehemiah Somes, Charles Sigourney, James Foster Candy

John Foster Williams, Jacob Williams, Nehemiah Somes

[Allen, MPR, 65, 66]


SIGOURNEY, ELISHA

MA

[Owner], Massachusetts Privateers


Elisha Sigourney was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was associated with the following privateers:

As security:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

9/19/80

MA

Brigantine Adventure (14/70)

James Morris

Henry Mitchell

James Morris, Elisha Sigourney, George Little

[NRAR, 221]


SILSBEE, NATHANIEL

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Nathaniel Silsbee was a resident of Salem, Massachusetts. Vessels associated with Mason were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

6/1/82

MA

Ship Cyrus (10/20)

Jonathan Mason, Jr.

Nathaniel Silsbee et al

Jonathan Mason, Jr., Jonathan Mason, Nathaniel Silsbee

[NRAR, 262]


SIMKINS [SIMPKINS], NICHOLAS

NJ

Midshipman, Continental Navy


Nicholas Simkins [Simpkins] was born in Egg Harbor, New Jersey. He enlisted there on 19 April 1776 as a Midshipman in the Continental Navy Brig Lexington (Captain JOHN BARRY), receiving an advance of £10.10.0. [NDAR, IX, 502-507] Simkins served aboard the brig throughout her service under Barry, including the Battle of the Delaware River (7/8 May 1776), the action with Dunmore's Sloop Tender Lady Susan, the action at Cape May (29 June 1776), and several other skirmishes. Simkins stayed aboard the Lexington under Captain WILLIAM HALLOCK, and participated in the voyage to Cap Francois, St. Domingue, the capture of the Lexington by HM Frigate Pearl, and the recapture by her crew the same day (20 December 1776). Simkins remained with the Lexington during the aborted captaincy of JOHN FULFORD. Simkins sailed with the Lexington for France under Captain HENRY JOHNSON on 26 February 1776. During the voyage two prizes were captured, the second being the Hanover, on 21 March 1777. Second Lieutenant David Welch was sent aboard as prizemaster and Simkins went as his mate. A short time later Welch met a French vessel and took two of Lexington's crew in a boat to buy necessaries. The three members of the Hanover's crew left aboard seized the prize crew's weapons and retook the ship, which arrived at Falmouth on 14 April 1777. Simkins was sent to prison.


SIMMONS [SIMONDS]

Captain, Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron


Simmons was at Crown Point on 18 August 1776, in command of the Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron Gondola Providence. [NDAR, 6, 224]


SIMMONS, JEREMIAH

PA

First Lieutenant, Pennsylvania Navy


Jeremiah Simmons was appointed as a Lieutenant in the Pennsylvania Navy on 19 September 1775, [NDAR, II, 154] and assigned to the Pennsylvania Navy Galley Warren, then under construction. She was commanded by Captain SAMUEL DAVIDSON [NDAR, II, 180] On 2 October 1775 Simmons received his commission, #7, dated 19 September. [NDAR, II, 272-273] When Davidson took leave of absence to make  a powder voyage on 28 November 1775, [NDAR, II, 1183-1184] Simmons took command of the Warren. On 27 December 1775 Simmons was ordered to take command of a company of artillery and proceed to Liberty Island. First Lieutenant HUGH MONTGOMERY was sent to the Warren, to command her in Simmons' absence. [NDAR, III, 264-266] On 24 February 1776 Simmons' appointment to the artillery was made permanent, he being named First Lieutenant in Proctor's Artillery Company. [NDAR, IV, 71 and note]


SIMMONS, THOMAS

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Thomas Simmons was a resident of Beverly, Massachusetts. On 22 December 1777 he was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Lively, and, on 20 April 1778 to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Lydia. [NOAR, 280] Simmons took command of the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Oliver Cromwell on 10 July 1778. In the following cruise, or cruises, five prizes were captured and brought into port. Oliver Cromwell was now re-rigged as a ship and Simmons was again commissioned to her on 29 March 1779. [see Oliver Cromwell] Simmons was commissioned to the New Hampshire Privateer Ship Friendship on 19 October 1779. On 13 June 1781 he was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Grand Turk, and, on 9 October 1781, to the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Ranger. On 5 August 1782 he was engaged by a British vessel off St. Mary’s and was wounded in the leg, but the British were driven off. [NOAR, 280]


SIMONS, DANIEL

RI

Commander, Rhode Island Privateers


Daniel Simons was presumably a native of Rhode Island. Hen was listed on the Rhode Island Privateer Sloop Yankee Ranger as Master when she was commissioned on 19 July 1776 under Commander JOHN WARNER. [NDAR, V, 1142-1143 and 1143 and note] Yankee Ranger sailed on 3 August 1776 and returned to Providence, Rhode Island  before 13 September 1776, having captured three prizes (brigantines Bee, Sally and John). [NDAR, VI, 194, 803-804, 820-821; VII, 642-647] Warner left the sloop and, for a time, SAMUEL TRIP was commander. [NDAR, VI, 955] When Trip left, Simons was promoted to commander. Rather than sailing against the British he patrolled off Nantucket Island. On 26 November 1776 he captured the schooner Nightingale, wholly owned in Nantucket. The schooner had, however, recently been captured and condemned by the British in the West Indies. The owner’s agent had repurchased the schooner at her sale and sent her home with a cargo from Hispaniola. Simons retained the schooner despite appeals from the locals. She was only released when her owners appealed to Nicholas Brown, reputedly a main owner of the Yankee Ranger. [NDAR, VII, 292-293 and 293 note, 1218-1219] Nothing more is known of Simons.


SIMPSON, THOMAS

(P)

Captain, Continental Navy

Commander, New Hampshire Privateers


Thomas Simpson was a native of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. [NOAR, 280] Simpson was commissioned to the New Hampshire Privateer Ship Alexander on 5 January 1781 and recommissioned to the same vessel on 5 January 1782. [NRAR, 223]


SKIMMER, JOHN

(P)

Captain, Continental Navy


SKINNER, HENRY

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Henry Skinner was allegedly a Captain in the Continental Navy. [NOAR, 282] He was possibly a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. Skinner was appointed commander of the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Apollo on 2 October 1780. [NRAR, 229]


SLACOM, GABRIEL

[see SLOCOM, GABRIEL]


SLATER, BENJAMIN

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Benjamin Slater was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. [NRAR, 245; Allen, MPR, 90] He served as First Lieutenant on a privateer. [NOAR, 282] On 29 August 1782 he was commissioned as Commander of the Massachusetts Privateer Boat Caesar. [NRAR, 245; Allen, MPR, 90] Slater survived the war and died in 1800. [NOAR, 282]


SLEYMAKER, JOHN

(A)

Lieutenant, Continental Navy


John Sleymaker was a Lieutenant in the Continental Navy. He was ranked twelfth in the Lieutenants’ List of 12 October 1776. [Allen, ii, 706-707]


SLOAN, JOHN PROUT

Captain, Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron


John Prout Sloan was a former merchant master, and part of Arnold's Massachusetts command on the lakes. [Bird, Navies, 132] Sloan was from New London or Middletown, Connecticut. [Claghorn, 282, 283] Sloan presumably enlisted with Arnold as a Captain, on 3 May 1775. [Claghorn, 282, says he was commissioned on 5 May] He was among those [Bird, Navies, 132] who seized Skenesborough on 11 May and commandeered Major Skene's schooner, where she became Continental Army Schooner Liberty. [NDAR, "Journal kept by Eleazer Oswald on Lake Champlain," 1, 312 and note] Sloan probably commanded her on the run up to Fort Ticonderoga, 11 May-14 May, when JONATHAN BROWN, ELEAZER OSWALD, and fifty of Arnold's men went up to that post. [NDAR, "Journal Kept by Eleazer Oswald on Lake Champlain," 1, 327 and 330; "Colonel Benedict Arnold to the Massachusetts Committee of Safety," 1, 330, "Colonel Benedict Arnold to the Massachusetts Committee of Safety, Cambridge," 1, 364-367] He definately commanded her in the raid on Fort St. Johns, [NDAR, "Journal kept by Eleazer Oswald on Lake Champlain," 1, 340 and note] 14 May 1775-19 May 1775, when Quebec Provincial Marine Sloop George was captured. Sloan transferred to the renamed George (now Continental Army Sloop Enterprise) on 20 May 1775, the sloop acting as Colonel Benedict Arnold's flagship. [NDAR, "Colonel Benedict Arnold to the Massachusetts Committee of Safety, Cambridge," 1, 512-513 and 513 note] (see ISAAC MATHUES) Arnold described Sloan as a "judicious, able" commander on 22 May. [NDAR, "Colonel Benedict Arnold to the Albany Committee of Safety," 1, 503-504 and 504 note] Sloan served aboard the Enterprise until 25 June 1775, when he was discharged with the remaining crew after "Arnold's Mutiny." Sloan was paid through 1 July 1775. [NDAR, "Pay Roll of the Continental Sloop Enterprise," 1, 797 and note] He was succeeded by JEREMIAH HALSEY. On 18 March 1779 Sloan was commissioned as commander of the Connecticut Privateer Schooner General Heath, with two guns and eight men. [Claghorn, 283] On 5 August 1779 he was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Patty, armed with ten guns and manned with a crew of twenty-five. In April 1780 Sloan captured the British snow Wolf, bound from Antigua to New York. [Claghorn, 283]


SLOCOM [SLACOM], GABRIEL

MD

Prize Master, Maryland Privateers


Gabriel Slocom [Slacom] was presumably a resident of Maryland. He was aboard the Massachusetts Privateer Brig Sturdy Beggar (Commander JAMES CAMPBELL) in the fall of 1777 when she made a cruise to Europe. At least one prize was captured and Master BENJAMIN CHEW and Prize Master Slocom went aboard. The prize was re-captured by the British and both men were committed to Forton Prison on 23 January 1778. [see Sturdy Beggar]


SMALLCORN, SAMUEL

NH

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


Samuel Smallcorn was a resident of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. He was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Schooner Beggar’s Benison on 7 June 1777. Smallcorn sailed from Portsmouth in early June and both he and the privateer were captured on 18 June by HM Frigate Milford. [see Beggar’s Benison]


SMEDLEY, SAMUEL

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Samuel Smedley was a resident of Fairfield, Connecticut in 1780. Middlebrook, MCR, 123] On 10 March 1776 he was commissioned as Second Lieutenant in the Connecticut Navy as assigned to Connecticut Navy Brig Defence (Captain SETH HARDING). He was promoted to First Lieutenant later in 1776 and commissioned as Captain on 15 November 1776. He commanded the Defence in the spring of 1777 and in March and April he captured the bark Lydia, schooner Anna, brig Grog and snow Swift. On 20 April 1778 he took the ship Cyrus, and, on 21 June 1778 the sloop Tonyn’s Revenge and the sloop Ranger. On 18 February 1780 he was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Ship Recovery. Recovery was captured on 23 March 1780 by HM Frigate Galatea and Smedley was sent to a prison ship in New York. He was later exchanged. [NOAR, 283] Smedley was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Hibernia on 10 October 1780. He recruited most of his crew in New London, and sailed from that port for Europe about 15 October. On 25 October, at 33°N, Hibernia was captured by HM Frigate Hussar (Captain Charles Morris Poole). She was taken into New York and libeled on 24 November 1780. Smedley was sent to England from New York in December 1780, by order of Vice Admiral Rodney. He was committed to Old Mill Prison, but escaped to The Netherlands. He returned to the United States in 1782, commanding the chartered ship [Middlebrook, MCR, 123] Heer Adams, [NOAR, 283] bringing a cargo of goods purchased for the United States by Commodore Gillon of the South Carolina Navy. [Middlebrook, MCR, 123] She arrived at Philadelphia on 12 September 1782. [NOAR, 283] Smedley died at Fairfield, Connecticut on 13 June 1783. [NOAR, 283]


SMEDREN, JOHN

[NY]

Second Mate [Lieutenant], New York Privateers


John Smedren, possibly of New York, served aboard the New York Privateer Sloop Beaver, commissioned on 29 June 1776 under Commander STEWART DEANE, as Second Mate (or Second Lieutenant). On her first cruise, to St. Eustatius, Netherlands West Indies, with New York Privateer Brigantine Enterprise (Commander JOSEPH DWIGHT), a rich prize, the ship Earl of Errol, was captured. Beaver was back in port by 11 October 1776. [see Beaver]


SMITH, CLEMENT

MD

Surgeon, Continental Navy


Clement Smith was a native of Maryland. On 16 January 1777 he was appointed as a Surgeon's Mate aboard the Maryland Navy Ship Defence (Captain NICHOLSON). On 10 February 1777 Smith was appointed as Surgeon's Mate on the Continental Navy Brig Lexington (Captain HENRY JOHNSON). [NOAR, 284. It is reported here that he later served as Surgeon on Continental Navy Schooner Hornet and was captured.] Smith served aboard the Lexington during her voyage to France (Baltimore to Nantes, 26 February 1777 to 3 April 1777). Two prizes were captured en route. He was aboard during the stunning cruise of Captain LAMBERT WICKES' squadron in the Irish Sea, 28 May 1777 to 27 June 1777, during which some twenty British vessels were captured and destroyed. It is possible that Surgeon NATHAN DORSEY left the Lexington about this time and that Smith was promoted to Surgeon. [NDAR, IX, 663, 665] Lexington sailed for home from Morlaix, France in September 1777. On 19 September 1777 Lexington was captured after a long and hard fought battle by HM Cutter Alert (Lieutenant John Bazely). [NDAR, IX, 657] Smith, styling himself as a Surgeon,  was noted as a prisoner aboard HMS Trident (Captain John Elliot) on 26 September, when Elliot wanted to know what to do with him. The Admiralty ordered Smith sent to Spithead, and committed to Fortun Prison the next day. [NDAR, IX, 663, 665] He was committed to Fortun Prison on 13 October 1777. [NOAR, 284]


SMITH, DANIEL

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


Daniel Smith was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Sloop Abigail on 6 February 1779. [Allen, MPR, 65] Smith was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Brigantine Recovery on 16 December 1779. [NOAR, 284]


SMITH, DAVID

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


David Snith was a resident of Salem, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Cutter on 6 April 1778. [Allen, MPR, 107] Smith was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Sloop Nancy on 25 November 1779 and to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Patty on 29 June 1782. [NOAR, 284]


SMITH, ELIPHALET

SC

Commander, South Carolina Privateers


Eliphalet Smith was in command of South Carolina Privateer Schooner [Coker, 91, 300] Volunteer in the summer of 1777. She captured two prizes, one of which was recaptured. [Coker, 91] On 18 September she was 180 miles northeast of St. Augustine (or 75 miles off Sullivan's Island). In the evening, about 1800, Smith saw several sail and ran down to investigate, with another vessel in company. The strangers were HM Frigates Brune and Galatea. Smith turned away and the chase was on. By 2030 the Brune was close enough to begin firing: thirty-three shots and several volleys of musketry were required before Volunteer struck. A boarding party came over and made a discovery: Volunteer was sinking. There was barely time to get the prisoners off before she went down. Smith did not make it aboard Brune, for he was killed "by a Musquet shot in bringing the Prisoners on board." [NDAR, IX, 940]


SMITH, HUGH

[CT]

Acting Second Lieutenant, Continental Navy

Hugh Smith enlisted aboard the Continental Navy Ship Alliance (Captain JOHN BARRY) on 5 July 1782 at New London, Connecticut. Alliance sailed from New London on 4 August 1782 and captured nine prizes, including four rich ones, during her cruise. She put into L'Orient, France on 18 October 1782. A dispute over prize money arose there, during which six or eight officers refused to do duty and were arrested, including two naval lieutenants. Smith was selected by Barry as a "pro tempy" officer from 8 December. [Smith, Marines, 393]  Alliance sailed for America on 9 December 1782, and arrived at Martinique on 9 January 1783. She soon sailed for Havana, stopping at St. Eustatius and Cap Francois, and arriving at Havana on 31 January. Alliance and Continental Navy Ship Duc de Lauzun (Captain JOHN GREEN) sailed from Havana on 6 March 1783. Wroth was aboard Alliance during the Battle of the Florida Straits on 10 March 1783. Alliance arrived in Rhode Island on 20 March. Since the end of the war was very near, most of her crew was discharged. Smith was probably discharged at this time. [Smith, Marines in the Revolution, 393]


SMITH, JABEZ


(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


SMITH, JAMES

Captain, Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron


SMITH, JOHN

MA

Second Lieutenant, Massachusetts Privateers


John Smith was aboard the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner America (Commander DANIEL McNEILL) as Second Lieutenant on 16 April 1777. [see America]


SMITH, JOHN

CT

Third Lieutenant, Connecticut Navy


John Smith was born in 1752. [NOAR, 286] He was a resident of East Hartford in 1776. He was appointed as Third Lieutenant on the Connecticut Navy Ship Oliver Cromwell by the Council of Safety on 27 August 1776 and was commissioned on 30 August. [NDAR, 6, 316] He succeeded SAMUEL CHAMPLIN, JR. He was aboard on 25 February 1777, according to the crew list. [NDAR, 7, 1283-1287] Smith was one of those officers who roomed and boarded ashore during the time the ship was fitting out, from about 5 December to 12 December 1776. [NDAR, 7, 459] Smith returned to New London from Lebanon on 19 March 1777, bringing the Council of Safety's request for Coit's accounts. [NDAR, 8, 153-154] He was dismissed with the entire crew and officers of the Oliver Cromwell on 11 April 1777 and reappointed as Third Lieutenant on the same day. [NDAR, 8, 319] Smith was prizemaster of HM Packet Ship Weymouth, bringing her in to Boston on 10 September 1777. He was then sent to Connecticut to brief Governor Trumbull. [NDAR, 9, 906-907] He was there by 16 September. [NDAR, 9, 907-908 and 908 note] He was promoted to First Lieutenant on 8 December 1777. [NOAR, 286] Smith was a Lieutenant aboard the Connecticut Privateer Schooner Bunker Hill (Commander SANFORD THOMPSON), commissioned on 7 April 1780. On 14 April Bunker Hill fell in with the British Privateer Sloop Dolphin (David Hunter). During the following fight Thompson was wounded and Smith took charge and captured the Dolphin. Two other prizes were captured on the cruise. [Middlebrook, MCR, II, 63] On 18 April 1782 Smith was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Ship Hunter. [NOAR, 286]


SMITH, JOSEPH

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Joseph Smith was a resident of Middletown, Connecticut. He was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Dolphin on 30 July 1779. [Middlebrook, Maritime Connecticut During The Revolution, II, 71] On 3 January 1781 he was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Ship Chatham. [NRAR, 252] He later commanded the Connecticut Privateer Brigantine Lady Green, in which, on 22 December 1781, he captured the brig Unity. [NOAR, 286]


SMITH, OLIVER, JR.

CT

Prize Master, Connecticut Privateers


Oliver Smith, Jr. was a resident of Stonington, Connecticut. He served aboard the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Hampton Packet (Commander THOMAS WICKHAM) as a Prize Master in March 1783. Smith was sent to the prize schooner Peggy on 2 March 1783 and brought her into New London, Connecticut on 6 March. [Middlebrook, Maritime Connecticut During The Revolution, II, 106]


SMITH, PASCHAL NELSON

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Paschal Nelson Smith was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was associated with ISAAC SEARS in privateering. Vessels associated with Smith were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

12/31/77

MA

Sloop Independence (10/55)

Peter Pollard

Isaac Sears, Paschal N. Smith

Peter Pollard, Isaac Sears, Paschal Nelson Smith

[Allen, MPR, 186]

4/6/78

CT

Ship General McDougall (10/30)

Joseph Jauncey

Paschal N. Smith, Isaac Sears, Benedict Arnold, Christopher Leffingwell, Samuel Broome, John Broome, Jeremiah Platt

Joseph Jauncey, Jeremiah Platt, John Broome

Margaret V. Vanderspiegel, Ebenezer Platt [NRAR, 311]

5/11/78

MA

Brigantine General Arnold (20/120)

James Magee

Isaac Sears, Paschal N. Smith

James Magee, Isaac Sears, Paschal N. Smith

Eliakim Raymond, Joseph Skillin [NRAR, 308]

5/11/78

CT

Ship Mars (22/130)

Gilbert Ash

Isaac Sears, Samuel Broome, John Broome

Gilbert Ash, Isaac Sears, John Broome

Eliakim Raymond, Joseph Skillin [NRAR, 385]

5/13/79

MA

Brigantine Amsterdam (10/30)

James Magee

Paschal Nelson Smith, Isaac Sears

James Magee, Leonard Jarvis, Paschal Nelson Smith

Daniel Denison Rogers, James Thwing, Jr. [Allen, MPR,74]

2/22/80

MA

Brigantine Amsterdam

James Magee

Isaac Sears, Paschal Nelson Smith

 

[Allen, MPR,74]

10/6/82

MA

Brigantine Firebrand (10/35)

Phoenix Frazier

Isaac Sears, Paschal Nelson Smith

Phoenix Frazier, Isaac Sears, Paschal N. Smith

Eliakim Raymond, George Scott [NRAR, 293]

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

1/12/79

MA

Sloop Independence (4/10)

Francis Brown

Isaac Sears et al

Francis Brown, Isaac Sears, Samuel Broome

[Allen, MPR, 187]

8/20/81

MA

Sloop Hermione (6/12)

Silas Rand

Isaac Sears et al

Silas Rand, Paschal N. Smith, Ebenezer Woodward

Eliakim Raymond, George Scott [NRAR, 333]

5/11/82

MA

Lugger Dreadnought (2/35)

Amos Potter

Isaac Sears et al

Amos Potter, Isaac Sears, Paschal N. Smith

Eliakim Raymond, George Scott [NRAR, 277]

5/11/82

MA

Schooner Poppet (4/10)

Thomas Barnard

Isaac Sears et al

Thomas Barnard, Isaac Sears, Paschal N. Smith

Isaac Peirce, John Dall [NRAR, 419]

12/3/82

MA

Sloop Assurance (14/75)

David Porter

Isaac Sears et al

David Porter, Isaac Sears, Paschal N. Smith

Eliakim Raymond, George Scott [NRAR, 230]

12/3/82

MA

Ship Gustavus (16/70)

James Magee

Isaac Sears et al

James Magee, Isaac Sears, Paschal N. Smith

Eliakim Raymond, George Scott [NRAR, 323]

As witness:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

11/8/80

MA

Brigantine Lucy (12/25)

Stephen Clay

Benjamin West et al

Stephen Clay, Samuel Gill, William Van Duerson

Paschal N. Smith, Eliakim Raymond [NRAR, 379]


SMITH, SAMUEL

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Samuel Smith was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was associated with the following privateers:

As security:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

10/13/82

MA

Brig Adventure (12/20)

Joseph Chase

Ebenezer Lane et al

Joseph Chase, Ebenezer Lane, Samuel Smith

[NRAR, 222]


SMITH, SAMUEL

MD

Owner, Maryland Privateers


Samuel Smith was a resident of Maryland, possibly Annapolis. He was associated with the following privateers:

As security:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

7/6/81

MD

Brig Otho (12/35)

John Martin

Samuel Smith, Wallace Johnson, John Muir

John Martin, John Muir

[Arch. MD. 45:495; NRAR, 408]


SMITH, SAMUEL JR.

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Samuel Smith, Jr., was a resident of Southington, Connecticut when he was commissioned, on 1 June 1781, to the Connecticut Privateer Galley Adventure. [NRAR, 222; Middlebrook, Maritime Connecticut During The Revolution, II, 49] In July 1781 he captured the British schooner Sword Fish in Long Island Sound. [Middlebrook, Maritime Connecticut During The Revolution, II, 49]


SMITH, SILAS

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Silas Smith was a resident of Salem, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Cutter on 6 August 1777. Cutter was soon at sea, patrolling off the coast of Nova Scotia. Sometime in September, she captured an unnamed sloop. On 17 September 1777 HM Brig Cabot was patrolling off Port Mouton Island, Nova Scotia, when a sail was sighted away to the southeast at 0600. Cabot chased, closed in the night, and hoisted out her boat. About this time two more sail were sighted to the east and Cabot went off to investigate them. The wind was coming up strong and a heavy sea running. One of the two sail bore away and went into Port Gambier [Gambear], Nova Scotia. Cabot followed her in and struck a rock at 1600. Cabot finally anchored in Port Gambier. Here she found her tender, schooner Charlotte, with its crew. The chase proved to be the Cutter. Cutter's crew had boarded the Charlotte, causing Charlotte's crew to throw their weapons overboard. When Cabot put into the harbor, Smith abandoned the Cutter, Charlotte, and the captured sloop. [NDAR, IX, 932-933 and 933 note]


SMITH, THOMAS

SC

Commander, South Carolina Privateers


Thomas Smith was in command of the South Carolina Privateer Brigantine America in 1777. [Coker, 300]


SMITH, WILLIAM

PA

Commander, Maryland Privateers


William Smith, a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was commissioned as First Mate on the Maryland Privateer Sloop Abingdon (Commander JAMES HANDY) on 14 September 1778. [NRAR, 217] Abingdon was captured by the British and taken into New York. She appears in the Admiralty court records as the Lord Abingdon, and Handy appears as James Hardy. [HCA 32/391/14/1-3] On 12 October 1782 Smith was appointed to command the Maryland Privateer Brig Escape, sailing out of Baltimore. [NOAR, 288]


SMITH, WILLIAM

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


William Smith was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [NRAR, 228] He was born about 1760 and was described as being 5'9" tall, with brown hair and a fresh complexion in 1781. He listed his age as 21. [NOAR, 289] Smith was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Brigantine L'Antoinette on 30 March 1782. [NRAR, 228]


SMITH, WILLIAM

MD

Owner, Maryland Privateers


William Smith was a resident of Baltimore, Maryland. He was associated with the following vessels:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

7/26/79

MD

Schooner Baltimore (6/10)

Robert Caulfield

William Smith et al

Robert Caulfield, James Calhoun

[NRAR, 232]


SMITH, WILLIAM

MD

[Owner], Pennsylvania Privateers


William Smith was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was associated with the following vessels:

As security:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

4/30/79

PA

Sloop Active (2/12)

William Green

Robert Bridges & Co.

Robert Bridges, William Smith

[NRAR, 217]


SNELL, ROBERT

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


Robert Snell of Philadelphia was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Sloop Chance on 3 May 1779, armed with two guns and manned with thirty men. [NRAR, 249] On 8 June 1780 he was appointed to the Pennsylvania Privateer Schooner Rattlesnake, of eight guns and thirty men. [Claghorn, 289]


SNODDIN, JOHN

MA

Second Lieutenant, Massachusetts Privateers


John Snoddin was aboard the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Boston (Commander WILLIAM BROWN) as Second Lieutenant when she was commissioned on 24 September 1776. [NDAR, VI, 922 and note] Boston sailed about 1 November 1776 and captured six prizes before returning to Boston, Massachusetts on 25 March 1777. [see Boston]


SNODEN, THOMAS

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Thomas Snoden was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts when he was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Buckram on 4 June 1777. [Allen, MPR, 89] He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer [unknown] Hancock on 3 April 1778. [NOAR, 290]


SNOW, ISAAC

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Isaac Snow was born in Truro, Massachusetts in 1714. [NOAR, 290] He was a resident of Hardswell, [Allen, Massachusetts Privateers of the Revolution, 70] in Cumberland County, in Maine. [NDAR, VI, 799-800] Snow was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner America on 13 September 1776. [NDAR, VI, 799-800] He was aboard the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner America (Commander DANIEL McNEILL) as First Lieutenant on 16 April 1777. [Allen, Massachusetts Privateers of the Revolution, 70] He died at St. Georges, Massachusetts [Maine] in 1799. [NOAR, 290]


SOLLY, NATHAN

First Mate, Pennsylvania Privateers


Nathan Solly was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1780 when he shipped on the Pennsylvania Privateer Brigantine Active (Commander JOHN CRAIG), commissioned 12 December 1780. [NRAR, 218] Solly was presumably captured aboard the Active on 5 March 1781 by HM Frigate Stag. [see Active]


SOMERVELL [SOMERSALL], RICHARD

MD

Commander, Maryland Privateers


Richard Somervell [NOAR, 290] [Somersall] [NRAR, 359] was a resident of Baltimore, Maryland. He was commissioned to the Maryland Privateer Sloop John on 31 December 1776. [NRAR, 359]


SOMES, ISAAC

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Isaac Somes was a resident of Gloucester (Cape Ann), Massachusetts. He was commisioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Sloop Union on 2 September 1776. [Allen, MPR, 310] Union captured three ships, two of which were sent into Cape Ann [Gloucester]; the third was in ballast and was released. She then sailed for European waters. On 12 November 1776 Union was about seventy-five miles west of the Rock of Lisbon, Portugal. Here two more vessels were captured. A short time later, Somes “forcibly” put eleven British sailors aboard a French vessel bound for Alicante, Spain. The French vessel arrived in November. The British sailors reported that Union was armed with ten guns, eight swivel guns, and had a crew of forty men. [Allen, Naval History of the American Revolution, i, 255, citing a letter from the British consul of 26 November 1776] Somes next commanded the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Fair Play, commissioned on 17 July 1777. [NRAR, 287; Allen, MPR, 125] On 6 October 1777 she is mentioned in the Boston Gazette, where Somes is referred to as “Isaac Sobries.” [Allen, MPR, 125] As Isaac “Sobrias” he libeled the 200-ton brigantine Jamaica Packet (John Blair) and the 40-ton schooner Bermuda (John Carrol) on 9 October 1777. Trial was set for 28 October. Both of these vessels were presumably captured in September 1777. [NDAR, IX, 89-90] Massachusetts Privateer Ship Sky Rocket was commissioned under Somes on 17 December 1778. [Allen, MPR, 280] Somes was next commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Wasp, on 3 August 1779. [Allen, MPR, 324] Somes was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Brig Favourite on 14 December 1779. Favourite was mentioned in the Boston Gazette of July 30, 1781. [Allen, MPR, 129] He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Tempest on 29 November 1781. [NRAR, 473; Allen, MPR, 296]


SOMES [SOAMES], JOHN

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


John Somes [Soames] was a resident of Gloucester, Massachusetts or of Newburyport, Massachusetts.He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Wasp on 7 May 1779. [Allen, MPR, 324] He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship America on 6 June 1780. [Allen, MPR, 72] Somes appears as the owner of the privateer Tempest, commissioned 29 November 1781.

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

11/29/81

MA

Ship Tempest (12/40)

Isaac Somes

John Somes et al

Isaac Somes, William Gee, William Parsons

Micholas Lobdell, Benjamin Somes, Jr. [NRAR, 391]


SOMES, NEHEMIAH

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Nehemiah Somes was a resident of Newburyport and Boston, Massachusetts. Somes was the lead owner in fitting out the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Active, petitioning the Massachusetts Council for an exchange of cannon on 11 October 1776. [NDAR, VI, 1213] He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Runfast [Run Fast] before 24 October 1776, when his owners ordered him to Yeocomico, Virginia, with a cargo of sugar, rum and salt. [NDAR, VI, 1395 and note]  If he completed this voyage he was back in Boston by 11 January 1777, when he signed a portledge bill. The bill shows Somes signed aboard on 7 January, receiving a month’s wages. [NDAR, VII, 921] He was ordered to sail to Baltimore, Maryland on 13 January, [NDAR, VII, 942-943] with a cargo of rum and sugar. [NDAR, VII, 1047 and note] On 27 January the Runfast was at anchor in Chesapeake Bay, when a cutting out expedition from HMS Preston and HM Frigate Phoenix captured her, along with three other vessels. After stripping the schooner [NDAR, VII, 1047 and note] she was cut up for firewood on 30 January. [NDAR, VII, 1072-1073] Somes, if this was the same man, was back in Boston by 16 April 1777, concerning himself with fitting out the Active. [NDAR, VIII, 352, 375-376] He was also associated with several privateers as owner, bonder and witness:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

10/[1]/76

MA

Schooner Active (6/65)

Andrew Gardner

Nehemiah Somes, Joseph Pierce, Eleazer Johnson, Thomas Melvill, John Hinkley

Andrew Gardner, Joseph Pierce, Nehemiah Somes

[NDAR, VI, 1213 and note]

10/13/77

MA

Brig Active (12/70)

John Foster Williams

Jacob Williams, Nehemiah Somes, Charles Sigourney, James Foster Candy

John Foster Williams, Jacob Williams, Nehemiah Somes

[Allen, MPR, 65, 66]

5/7/79

MA

Schooner Wasp (8/40)

John Somes

  

[NOAR, 291]

9/28/80

MA

Brigantine Porga (14/40)

William Armstrong

 

William Armstrong, Thomas Dawes, Jr., Nehemiah Somes

Joseph Henderson, John Davidson [NRAR, 419]

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

11/8/80

MA

Brigantine Zephyr (4/15)

George Lane

Ebenezer Lane

George Lane, Ebenezer Lane, Nehemiah Somes

William W. Parsons, Gibson Parsons, Moses Greenleaf [NRAR, 495]

3/19/81

MA

Schooner Fortune (8/30)

Joshua Burges

Tristram Dalton et al

Joshua Burges, Nehemiah Somes, Gustavus Fellows

Samuel Deming, Nicholas Bowe [NRAR, 298]

8/16/81

MA

Brigantine Delight (8/20)

Nathaniel Sargent

William Parsons et al

Nathaniel Sargent, William Parsons, Nehemiah Somes

Joshua Loring, Jr., John Lavell [NRAR, 266]

2/6/82

MA

Ship Antelope (8/16)

Edward Fettyplace

Tristram Dalton et al

Edward Fettyplace, Stephen Bruce, Nehemiah Somes

William Payne, John Fairservice [NRAR, 228]

8/12/82

MA

Schooner Ranger (6/20)

Joshua Burges

John Low et al

Joshua Burges, Nehemiah Somes, Joshua Wetherle

Bartholomew Kneeland, Ebenezer Perry [NRAR, 431]

As witness:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

9/22/80

MA

Schooner Peacock (4/16)

Sargent Smith

Daniel Sargent

Sargent Smith, Ebenezer Parsons, Daniel Sargent

Samuel Stimpson, Nehemiah Somes [NRAR, 411]

9/22/80

MA

Schooner Wasp (4/16)

Enoch Pike

Daniel Sargent

Enoch Pike, Ebenezer Parsons, Daniel Sargent

Samuel Stimpson, Nehemiah Somes [NRAR, 490]

3/21/81

MA

Schooner Medium (4/25)

Benjamin Withem

William Pierce et al

Benjamin Withem, William Gee, William Pierce

Ebenezer Lane, Nehemiah Somes [NRAR, 389]

3/21/81

MA

Schooner Union (4/20)

Daniel Parsons

William Gee et al

Daniel Parsons, William Pierce, William Gee

Ebenezer Lane, Nehemiah Somes [NRAR, 482]


SPENCE, [--]

(P)

Captain, Continental Marines


SPENCER, JAMES

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


James Spencer, possibly of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was commissioned, on 11 June 1779, to command the Pennsylvania Privateer Schooner Addition. [NRAR, 220]


SPENCER, SAMUEL

SC

Commander, South Carolina Privateers


Samuel Spencer was in command of the South Carolina Privateer Schooner Witch at an unknown date. [Coker, 300]


SPOONER, GEORGE

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


George Spooner, listing his address as Norwich, Connecticut, was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Boat Vermont on 24 June 1782. [NRAR, 486]


SPOONER, WALTER

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


SPRAGUE, Dr. JOHN

MA

Surgeon, Massachusetts Privateers


Dr. John Sprague served as Surgeon aboard the Massachusetts Privateer Brig Active (Commander JOHN FOSTER WILLIAMS), which was commissioned on 13 October 1777. Active was captured by HM Frigate Mermaid on 18 November 1777 and Sprague was carried into Newport as a prisoner. An exchange was agreed to on 28 February 1778. [NDAR, XI, 418-419 and 419 note, XI, 462 and note]


SPRAGUE, JOSEPH

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Joseph Sprague was a resident of Salem, Massachusetts. He was associated in privateering with BARTHOLOMEW PUTNAM, HENRY RUST, JOSHUA WARD, Jr, JACOB ASHTON, BENJAMIN GOODHUE, Jr., SAMUEL WILLIAMS, SAMUEL WARD, JONATHAN GARDNER, Jr., EBENEZER MAY, and NATHANIEL WHEELER. Sprague was associated with the following privateers:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

12/15/75

MA

Schooner Dolphin

Richard Masury

Bartholomew Putnam, Joseph Sprague, Henry Rust, Joshua Ward

Richard Masury, Bartholomew Putnam, Joseph Sprague, Joshua Ward, Jr.

Jonathan Webb, Jeremiah Shepard [Allen, MPR, 116]

7/12/76

MA

Sloop Rover (8/50)

Simon Forrester

Jacob Ashton, Joseph Sprague, Bartholomew Putnam

Simon Forrester, Jacob Ashton, Joseph Sprague

Daniel Hopkins, Jonathan Molineux [Allen, MPR, 267]

11/13/76

MA

Sloop Rover (8/45)

Abijah Boden

Joseph Sprague & Co.

Abijah Boden, Joseph Sprague

Andrew Cabot, Joshua Dodge [Allen, MPR, 267-268]

12/3/76

MA

Schooner True American (10/65)

William Carlton

Joseph Sprague & Co.

William Carlton, Joseph Sprague, Benjamin Goodhue

James Jeffry, Samuel Ward [Allen, MPR, 306]

8/28/78

MA

Schooner Dolphin (2/30)

John Carrick

Henry Rust, Joseph Sprague

John Carrick, Henry Rust, Joseph Sprague

Daniel Hopkins [Allen, MPR, 117]

11/20/82

MA

Brigantine Fox (8/30)

William Gray

Joseph Sprague et al

William Gray, Samuel Williams, Joseph Sprague

[NRAR, 303]

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

1/4/79

MA

Brigantine Union (6/20)

William Langdell

Jonathan Gardner, Jr. et al

William Langdell, Joseph Sprague, Samuel Ward

Joshua Ward, Jr., John Burchmore [Allen, MPR, 311]

9/9/80

MA

Schooner Dolphin (8/20)

David Ropes

Samuel Ward et al

David Ropes, Joseph Sprague, Samuel Ward

[NRAR, 272]

8/3/81

MA

Boat Pompey (0/10)

William Thomas

Ebenezer May

William Thomas, Joseph Sprague, Nathaniel Wheeler

[NRAR, 418]


STACK, EDMUND

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


STACEY, THOMAS

[see STACY, THOMAS]


STACKPOLE [STACPOLE], JOSHUA

NH

Commander, New Hampshire Privateers


Joshua Stackpole (Stacpole) was a resident of Somersworth, New Hampshire when he was commissioned to the New Hampshire Privateer Brigantine McClary on 2 September 1777. [NRAR, 381] During the ensuing cruise, on 10 October 1777, [NRAR, 82] the schooner Susannah (Matthew Wood) was captured and sent into port. [NRAR, 55-56] This vessel's cargo was claimed by residents of New Hampshire, leading to a long and difficult prize case. [NRAR, 55-56, 60, 61, 82]


STACPOLE, JOSHUA

See STACKPOLE, JOSHUA


STACY [STACEY], THOMAS

RI

Commander, Rhode Island Privateers



STANWOOD, JOSEPH

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Thomas Stacy [Stacey] was a resident of Newport, Rhode Island. He was master of the merchant brig Mary in late 1775, on a voyage from Gaspee to Dominica. On 4 January 1776 the Mary was captured in the West Indies by HM Sloop Viper. [NDAR, III, 623] Stacy got passage to America, arriving at Newburyport, Massachusetts on 28 April 1776, and at Newport on 14 May 1776. [NDAR, V, 168] He was aboard the Rhode Island Privateer Sloop Diamond (Commander WILLIAM CHACE, Jr,) on 6 July 1776, presumably as a Prize Master. When the ship Jane was captured on 22 July, Stacy was assigned as her prize master. He brought her into Providence on 6 August 1776. [see Diamond] Stacy was commissioned on 20 August 1776 to the Diamond, [Sheffield, 59] replacing Chace. On the following cruise Stacy captured an unknown schooner, the British Transport Ship Woodcock, the brig Mary and Joseph, and the brigantine Live Oak. [see Diamond] Stacy was again commissioned to the Diamond on 5 November 1777. [Sheffield, 60]

Joseph Stanwood was a resident of Newburyport, Massachusetts. Stanwood was associated in privateering with MOSES BROWN, JONATHAN MULLIKEN, and ABNER GREENLEAF.

Privateers associated with Stanwood:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

1/31/81

MA

Ship Beaver (6/20)

William Russell

Moses Brown, Joseph Stanwood, Jonathan Mulliken, Abner Greenleaf

William Russell, Jonathan Mulliken, Joseph Stanwood

[NRAR, 233]

2/5/81

MA

Ship Beaver (6/20)

William Russell

Moses Brown, Joseph Stanwood, Jonathan Mulliken, Abner Greenleaf

William Russell, Moses Brown, Jonathan Mulliken

[NRAR, 233]


STANTON, THOMAS

[RI]

Commander, Rhode Island Privateers


Thomas Stanton, possibly of Rhode Island, was commissioned to the Rhode Island Privateer [unknown] Barber on 10 July 1779. [see Barber]


STAPLES, ENOCH

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


A manifest of Connecticut Privateer Sloop Wooster’s stores was drawn up, dated 22 May 1777, and typical of an application for a commission. Her commander was listed as Enoch Staples. [NDAR, VIII, 1020] Wooster was re-commissioned, still under Staples, on 3 November 1777. [NOAR, 294] During the ensuing cruise Wooster captured the 150 ton snow Atlantic (Charles Morris). [NDAR, X, 242 and note]


STARK, BENJAMIN

CT

Mate, Connecticut Privateers


Benjamin Stark was a Mate on the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Eagle (Commander WILLIAM LEEDS), commissioned 4 May 1782. One prize was captured on the following cruise. Eliza was sold at Havana, Cuba about August 1782. [Middlebrook, II, 80]


STARR, DANIEL

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


STEEL, THOMAS

MD

Commander, Maryland Privateers


Thomas Steel was a resident of Baltimore, Maryland. [NRAR, 233] He was commissioned to the Maryland Privateer Schooner Beggar's Benison on 7 July 1777. [NDAR, IX, 236; NRAR, 233]


STEPHENS [STEVENS], THOMAS, JR.

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Thomas Stephens, Jr. was a resident of Beverly, Massachusetts. He served aboard the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Retaliation (Commander ELEAZER GILES), commissioned 4 September 1776, as First Lieutenant. [Howe, Beverly Privateers, 433] On the ensuing cruise four valuable prizes were captured. [see Retaliation] Stephens, as Stevens, and now listing his residence as Marblehead, Massachusetts, was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Brig Bellona (but listed as Velona) on 29 April 1777.  By late summer of 1777 Stephens was at sea, taking three prizes, one of which was re-captured. [see Bellona] Stephens was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Sloop Bowdoin on 2 July 1778. [Howe, Beverly Privateers, 433] His name was now given as Stevens and his residence as Salem, Massachusetts. [Allen, MPR, 87]


STERETT, JOHN

See JOHN STERRETT


STERRETT [STERETT], JOHN

MD

Owner, Maryland Privateers


John Sterrett (or Sterett) was a resident of Baltimore, Maryland. He was associated in privateering with JESSE HOLLINGSWORTH, DANIEL BOWLEY, JOHN McLURE, BENJAMIN CROCKETT, and JOHN CROCKETT. Vessels associated with Sterrett were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

8/18/78

MD

Brig Burling (18/50)

Robert Caulfield

John Sterett, Daniel Bowley et al

Robert Caulfield, Charles Wallace

Thomas Johnson [NRAR, 245]

2/16/79

MD

Sloop Swift (10/12)

James Gould

John McLure, John Sterett

James Gould, John Davidson

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 470]

5/15/79

MD

Schooner Baltimore Hero (22/30)

John Earle

Benjamin and John Crockett, John Sterrett et al

John Earle, John Crockett

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 232]

6/15/79

MD

Schooner Camden (6/9)

Jacob Walters

John Sterett & Co.

Jacob Walters, James Govane

William Hyde [NRAR, 245]

5/6/80

MD

Schooner Two Sisters (4/11)

William Jones

John Sterett & Co.

William Jones, John Davidson

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 481]

8/17/80

MD

Schooner Antelope (14/40)

Jeremiah Yellott

John Sterrett, Jesse Hollingsworth et al

Jeremiah Yellott, Charles Wallace

William Hyde [NRAR, 227]

8/17/80

MD

Schooner Felicity (10/25)

Frederick Folger

John Sterett, Jesse Hollingsworth et al

Frederick Folger, Charles Wallace

William Hyde [NRAR, 292]

1/20/81

MD

Schooner Antelope (12/35)

Frederick Folger

John Sterrett & Co.

Frederick Folger, William Neill

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 228]

1/20/81

MD

Schooner Felicity (10/21)

Thomas Cole

John Sterett & Co.

Thomas Cole, William Neill

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 292]

5/19/81

MD

Schooner Somerset (8/30)

William Jones

John Sterett & Co.

William Jones, George G. Gale

Alexander Roxburgh, Henry Jackson [NRAR, 459]

11/17/81

PA

Schooner Felicity (8/20)

Peter Wing

Jeremiah Yellott, John Sterett, Jesse Hollingsworth

Levi Hollingsworth, David Sterett, Peter Wing

James Trimble, Josiah Siddons [NRAR, 292]


STEVENS [STEPHENS], DAVID

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


David Stevens (or Stephens) was a native of Egg Harbor, New Jersey. He was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Sloop Chance on 16 July 1778, of two guns and forty men. [NRAR, 249] On 21 September 1778 a David Stephens (probably the same man) was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Sloop Hornet of six guns and fifty men. On 28 August 1780 he was appointed to the Pennsylvania Privateer Schooner Rattlesnake, with eight guns and thirty-five men. [Claghorn, 295]


STEVENS, LEVERIDGE [LEVERETT, LEVERET]

CT

Master, Continental Army Victuallers


Leveridge [Leverett, Leveret] Stevens was a resident of New Haven, Connecticut in 1778, but born in Killingsworth, Connecticut. He owned the sloop Eagle, apparently contracted to carry cargo for the Continental Army. On 10 June 1778 Eagle was captured by HM Armed Brigantine Diligent and taken to New York. Stevens was later exchanged. [Middlebrook, II, 78-79]


STEVENS, THOMAS

See STEPHENS, THOMAS


STEWARD [STEWART], WILLIAM

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


William Steward (or Stewart) was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. [Allen, Massachusetts Privateers, 91] He was first commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Lizard on 23 September 1777, followed by the Massachusetts Privateer Sloop General Montgomery on 3 February 1778. Steward was next commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer [unknown] Centipede [Cente Pea] on 11 May 1778. On 18 July 1778 he was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer [unknown] Black Prince. Next, he was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Lee, on 4 November 1778. [NOAR, 297]  He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Cato on 1 May 1779. [Allen, Massachusetts Privateers, 91]


STEWART, JAMES

Captain, Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron


James Stewart took command of the Continental Army Schooner Liberty about 25 June 1775, following the affair of Arnold's Mutiny. He sailed her from Crown Point at 0800 on 3 August on a patrol down the lake, returning at 1600 on 4 August with valuable information. Another patrol was run about 20 August, up to Isle la Motte. Information was recovered here on 23 August and Liberty sailed for Crown Point the next day. [NDAR, 1, 1215-1216; 1, 1055] [after further research see Clagorn, 297]


STEWART, JOHN A.

NY

Owner, New York Privateers


John A. Stewart of New York was associated in privateering with JOHN B. LIVINGSTON. Vessels associated with Livingston were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Security

Witness

6/29/76

NY

Sloop Beaver (6/20)

Stewart Deane

John B. Livingston, John A. Stewart

  


STEWART, JOHN

(P)

Captain, Continental Marines


STEWART, WILLIAM

see STEWARD, WILLIAM


STILES, THOMAS

MD

Commander, Maryland Privateers


Thomas Stiles was presumably a resident of Maryland when he was commissioned to the Maryland Privateer Schooner Beggar’s Benison on 22 June 1778. [see Beggar’s Benison]


STILL, JOHN

[NH?]

[Prize Master], New Hampshire Privateers


John Still was an officer aboard the New Hampshire Privateer Ship Portsmouth (Commander JOHN HART). He was made prize master of the brigantine Mercury when she was captured on 8 September 1777. He took her into the Gironde River on 1 October 1777, coming in with the English colors inverted to signify she was a prize. She was immediately ordered back out by the French. After a trip to Bordeaux Still returned on 6 October and Mercury sailed for Bilboa on the 8th. She arrived there where she and the cargo were sold. [See Portsmouth]


STILLMAN, GEORGE

First Lieutenant, Continental Marines


The Rhode Island Frigate Committee appointed George Stillman as First Lieutenant of Marines aboard the Continental Navy Ship Warren (Captain JOHN BURROUGHS HOPKINS) on 14 June 1776. [NDAR, V, 526-527, 856 and note; VI, 651-652] Stillman was a resident of New Hampshire. [NOAR, 298] Warren was not a happy ship. On 11 February 1776, a group of officers from the Warren approached attorney Robert Treat Paine. They had drawn up a paper containing charges against Commodore ESEK HOPKINS and his son, Captain John Burroughs Hopkins. Prominent among the ten signers were Captain of Marines JOHN GRANNIS and his two lieutenants, Stillman and BARNABAS LOTHROP. Paine advised them to go to the Marine Committee. [NDAR, VII, 1166-1168 and 1168 note] The officers agreed that they would draw up statements and Grannis would take them to Philadelphia, to the Marine Committee, thus absenting himself without permission of his commanding officer. The officers drew up their statements on 23 and 24 February. A cover letter, dated 19 February, was drawn up. [NDAR,VII, 1234-1235 and 1235 note; 1265 and note, 1275-1276, 1276-1277] Grannis was in Philadelphia in March. About 24 March 1776 he was examined by a subcommittee of the Marine Committee, in relation to the charges he had brought against Hopkins. [NDAR, VIII, 189-192] Two days later Congress suspended Hopkins from command.


STIRK, JOHN

GA

Captain, Georgia Navy


In command of the initial Georgia Navy Schooner in January 1776. Probably seized the Inverny in January 1776. Took Captain JOSEPH RICE aboard as his Marine Captain with his militia riflemen in January 1776. Stationed off Savannah in January 1776, where he participated in the Battle of Hutchinson’s Island, 3-4 March 1776. He was Lt. Col, then Col. Of the 3rd Georgia in 1778. [139]


STODDARD, NOAH

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Noah Stoddard was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Cato on 3 November 1779. [Allen, Massachusetts Privateers, 91-92] Stoddard was next commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Amazon on 27 March 1780. [Ibid, 70] He was subsequently commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Free Mason on 26 July 1781. [NRAR, 304] Stoddard was next commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Scammel on 13 April 1782. [NRAR, 455] In June 1782 Stoddard captured the sloop Fox and sent her into Boston. [Claghorn, 299] In July 1782, in conjunction with Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Hero (Commander George Waith Babcock), Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Hope (Commander Herbert Woodbury), and New Hampshire Privateer Cutter Swallow (Commander John Tibbits), the Scammel raided the town of Lunenburgh, Nova Scotia, located thirty miles west of Halifax. [ Claghorn, 11, 299, 311, 343] A landing party was put ashore and  moved against the town while the privateers entered the harbor. The town was soon captured. [Maclay, American Privateers, 215] A Colonel Creighton, the commander of the town, [Claghorn, 299, 343] was captured and the town held for ransom: [Maclay, American Privateers, 215] Creighton paying the £2000 [Claghorn, 299] (or £1000) [Maclay, American Privateers, 215] required. Scammell was patrolling off the New Jersey coast in October 1782 when she fell in with two British warships. Scammell was chased and driven ashore. The British warships sent boats to board and burn the Scammell but met with such a hot reception that they retreated. The privateer was refloated and safely got into port. [Maclay, American Privateers, 216]


STONE, BENJAMIN

SC

Commander, South Carolina Privateers


Benjamin Stone was in command of the South Carolina Privateer Sloop Sally at an unknown date. He also may the Commander “Stone” who was in command of the South Carolina Privateer [unknown] Hibernia in 1777. [Coker, 300]


STONE, ROBERT

MA

[Owner], Massachusetts Privateers


Robert Stone was a resident of Salem, Massachusetts. He was presumptively one of the owners of a privateer, the Beaver, when he petitioned for a commission on 3 June 1779, with JOSEPH LAMBERT.

Vessels associated with Stone were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

6/3/79

MA

Schooner Beaver (2/30)

William Bootman

[Joseph Lambert, Robert Stone]

 

[Allen, MPR, 78]


STONE, SAMUEL

SC

Commander, South Carolina Privateers


On 12 December 1776 a South Carolina vessel with no description, the Hibernia, was commissioned under a Commander Stone, as a privateer. About the same time, the schooner General ----- was commissioned under Commander Samuel Stone. These are probably the same vessel, with a new name. She was probably the former South Carolina Navy Schooner Hibernia. [NDAR, VII, 467-468] Samuel Stone was in command of the South Carolina Privateer Schooner General Washington in 1777. [Coker, 300]


STONE, WILLIAM


(P)

Captain, Continental Navy


STOW [STOWE], SAMUEL

CT

Lieutenant, Connecticut Privateers


Samuel Stow [Middlebrook, MCR, II, 63] (Stowe) was born in 1744. He was sucessively a Midshipman and Third Mate in the Connecticut Navy, aboard the Connecticut Navy Ship Oliver Cromwell (Captain TIMOTHY PARKER) in 1777-1778. He was promoted to First Mate and served from 1778-1779. [NOAR, 301] Stow was a Lieutenant aboard the Connecticut Privateer Schooner Bunker Hill (Commander Sanford Thompson), commissioned on 7 April 1780. When Bunker Hill fell in with British Privateer Sloop Dolphin (David Hunter) on 14 April a hard fight ensued. Thompson was wounded and Stow killed before Dolphin struck. [Middlebrook, MCR, II, 63]


STOWE, SAMUEL

[See STOW, SAMUEL]


STRENY, M.

[See STRONG, MATTHEW]


STROBACH, J. M.


(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


STRONG [STRENY], MATTHEW

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


Matthew Strong was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [NRAR, 222] He was born about 1744 or 1745. [NOAR, 301] On 6 November 1778 he was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Schooner St. John, [NRAR, 464] and, on 18 October 1779, to the Pennsylvania Privateer Schooner Concord. [NRAR, 258] He was appointed to the Pennsylvania Privateer Brig Pilgrim on 21 April 1781, [NRAR, 415] listing his age as 37. [NOAR, 301] On 29 September 1781 Strong was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Ship Patty. [NRAR, 411] His final command was the Pennsylvania Privateer Schooner Adventure, commissioned on 29 May 1782. [NRAR, 222. Emmons, 127, lists her commander as “M. Streny.”] Strong was still listing his age as 37. [NOAR, 301]


STROUT, JOSEPH

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Joseph Strout was a resident of Salem, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Cutter on 27 September 1782. [NRAR, 261]


SUGDEN, GEORGE

MA

First Mate, Massachusetts Privateers


George Sugden was a resident of Beverly, Massachusetts. On 14 August 1780 he was aboard the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Pilgrim (Commander JOSEPH ROBINSON) as First Mate. [Howe, Beverly Privateers, 414]


SULLIVAN, JAMES

MA

[Owner], Massachusetts Privateers


James Sullivan was a resident of Salem, Massachusetts. He was associated in privateering with SAMUEL PAGE. Vessels associated with Sullivan were:

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

9/27/82

MA

Schooner Cutter (6/30)

Joseph Strout

Samuel Page et al

Joseph Strout, Samuel Page, James Sullivan

Onesiphorus Tileston, W. Rogers [NRAR, 261]


SULLIVAN, PHILIP

SC

Commander, South Carolina Privateers


Philip Sullivan was in command of the South Carolina Privateer Ship General Moultrie at an unknown date. He also commanded the South Carolina Privateer Ship Volunteer. [Coker, 300]


SUMNER,

Captain, Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron


Sumner was at Crown Point on 18 August 1776, in command of the Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron Gondola Boston. [NDAR, 6, 224]


SUTTON, WOOLMAN

PA

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


Woolman Sutton was in command of the Pennsylvania Privateer Ship Aurora in May 1780. She sailed from Philadelphia on 24 May and from Delaware Bay on 26 May. She was chased by HM Frigate Iris, and ran back into the bay. After an hour’s action the Aurora was captured by Iris. She was taken into New York. The action was later immortalized in a poem by a passenger on the Aurora, Philip Freneau. [see Aurora for references]


SWAN, JAMES

MA

[Owner], Massachusetts Privateers


James Swan was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was associated in privateering with SILAS ATKINS, SILAS ATKINS, JR., JOHN LOWELL, WILLIAM STEWARD, ANDREW OLIVER, and JONATHAN NUTTING. Vessels associated with Swan were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

5/4/78

MA

Schooner Bunker Hill (7/35)

Isaac Cobb

John Lowell, Silas Atkins, Silas Atkins, Jr., James Swan et al

Isaac Cobb, John Lowell, Silas Atkins, Jr.

[Allen, MPR, 89]

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

5/1/79

MA

Schooner Cato (2/20)

William Steward

Jonathan Nutting et al

William Steward, James Swan, Silas Atkins, Andrew Oliver, Jonathan Nutting

Robert Lash, Nathaniel Baker [Allen, MPR, 91]


SWASEY, NATHANIEL

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Nathaniel Swasey was a resident of Beverly, Massachusetts. He was commissioned as commander of the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Active on 13 December 1780. [NRAR, 218]



Revised 23 August 2014 © awiatsea.com