M




McAROY [McELROY], GEORGE
PA

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


George McAroy [McElroy] was born about 1735. [NOAR, 202] McAroy was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [NRAR, 280] He was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Sloop Congress on 11 April 1776, one of the first two privateers fitted out in Pennsylvania. On 22 April Congress sailed with Pennsylvania Privateer Sloop Chance (Commander JOHN ADAMS) on a very successful cruise, returning to Egg Harbor, New Jersey in early June 1776 with four prizes were captured. McAroy left the sloop soon after. [see Congress] On 3 March 1780 he was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Brig Elizabeth, [NRAR, 280] and, on 22 December 1781, to the Pennsylvania Privateer Brigantine Perseverance. [NRAR, 413] He listed his age as 46 when commissioned to the Perseverance. [NOAR, 202]


MACATTER [MíCARTY, McCARTY], EDWARD

Commander, Continental Privateers


Edward Macatter [MíCarty, McCarty] was commissioned as commander of the privateer Black Princess by Benjamin Franklin, one of the American Commissioners to France. Between 20 June and 10 July 1780 Macatter captured twenty-eight British vessels. In 1781 he was captured by the British. On 28 October 1781 he was committed to Mill Prison. On 28 November he was removed and taken to London in chains, the British having learned he was not an American. [NOAR, 192]


McBRIDE, HUGH
MD

Owner, Maryland Privateers


Hugh McBride was presumably from Maryland. He was associated in privateering with JOHN CRAIG, WILLIAM McBRIDE, and CHARLES PHILLYSHILL. Vessels associated with McBride were:
As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

6/22/78

MD

Schooner Beggar’s Benison (0/7)

Thomas Stiles

John Craig, Hugh McBride, William McBride, Charles Phillyshill

 

 


McBRIDE, WILLIAM
MD

Owner, Maryland Privateers


William McBride was presumably from Maryland. He was associated in privateering with JOHN CRAIG, HUGH McBRIDE, and CHARLES PHILLYSHILL. Vessels associated with McBride were:
As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

6/22/78

MD

Schooner Beggar’s Benison (0/7)

Thomas Stiles

John Craig, Hugh McBride, William McBride, Charles Phillyshill

 

 


McBRIDE, WILLIAM

Commander, [unknown] Privateers


William MacBride commanded the [unknown] Privateer [unknown] Two Brothers in January 1782, when she was captured by the Duke of Portland and the Barbary. [NOAR, 191]


McCABE, JOHN
VA

Commander, Virginia Privateers


John McCabe was commissioned to the Virginia Privateer Ship Friendship on 23 January 1781. [NRAR, 306]


McCARTHY, EUGENE

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


McCARTHY, JOHN
PA

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


John McCarthy was born about 1754. [NOAR, 200] and was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Brigantine Comet on 13 December 1780. [NRAR, 255] At this time he was described as 5 feet 7 inches tall with dark brown hair and a dark complexion. [NOAR, 200] Seven months later, he was appointed as First Mate on the Pennsylvania Privateer Ship Columbia (Commander WILLIAM SARGEANT). [NRAR, 254] McCarthy was now described as before, except he listed his age as 25 and was noted as having a fresh complexion. [NOAR, 200]


McCARTHY, RANDOLPH
PA

First Mate, Pennsylvania Privateers


Randolph McCarthy was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. On 20 December 1781 he was appointed as First Mate on the Pennsylvania Privateer Ship Sally (Commander JOHN CHRISTIE). [NRAR, 453]










M’CARTY, EDWARD

[see MACATTER, EDWARD]


McCARTY, EDWARD

[see MACATTER, EDWARD]


McCARVER [McCAVER], ROBERT

Master’s Mate, Continental Navy


Robert McCarver [McCaver] was evidently enlisted aboard the Continental Navy Brig Reprisal (Captain LAMBERT WICKES) from among British prisoners. He served aboard the Reprisal for nearly nine months as [Second] Mate, and was aboard during the raid through the Irish Sea. When the valuable ship Grace was captured, Wickes put McCarver aboard as prize master [NDAR 9: 521-522] and a mixed prize crew of various nationalities, including some men who had but recently joined. [NDAR 9: 472-473] The prize was ordered to France. McCarver set sail for France, battling headwinds. After several days, McCarver bore away for the English coast. He avoided the English ports on the Bristol Channel, as well as those to the west of Torbay, and put into the open road of Torbay, anchoring there to ride out the wind. McCarver was hoping no British ship would notice the Grace there. About the same time that Grace was running into Torbay, HM Tender Neptune (tender to HMS Prince George, Captain Charles Middleton) ran in to anchor, having the same problem with wind as the Grace. Seeing the tender approaching, some of the men broached the idea of turning Grace over to the British. McCarver, deciding he could not escape, fell in with the idea. [NDAR 9: 521-522] The men told the boarding party that they were forced into American service, and “instead of obeying the Orders they had received from their Captains, steered their Course for England.” Neptune took the Grace in charge and arrived with her at Portsmouth on 7 July 1777, two weeks after her capture. [NDAR 9: 472] McCarver was carried before Admiral Sir Thomas Pye for interrogation. McCarver told Pye, and Captain Charles Middleton, of HMS Prince George that the prize crew were men “detained from prizes or forced from indentures” to serve. Middleton said the “intention of bringing” the “prize into England instead of France seems to have been general.” He requested the Admiralty, on 7 July, to allow him to continue the men aboard Prince George as part of her crew. [NDAR 9: 472-473] It was probably this last item, service in the Royal Navy, that blew McCarver’s cover, so to say. McCarver declared he “would rather lie in a Jail than serve on board any of His Majestys Ships.” Middleton now made a detailed examination into McCarver’s story. He noted the man was “Nine Months in Arms against his Country,” that he was rated a Master’s Mate, “of Course a Voluntier,” and his journal revealed a “Person well inclined to their Service.” Middleton concluded McCarver was “esteemed a Zealous Partisan on board the Privateer & trust worthy Man to confide their best Prize to.” He had many opportunities to escape the Americans in France, but did not. He did his best to avoid British shipping, and only adopted the story of returning the ship when capture was imminent. [NDAR 9: 521-522]


McCAY, JAMES

[See McCOY, JAMES]


M’CLAIN, JOHN

[See McCLANE, JOHN]


McCLANE, JOHN

PA

Second Lieutenant, Pennsylvania Navy


On 1 June 1776, John McClane [M’Clain] was a Mate on the Pennsylvania Navy Ship Montgomery. Later he served in the same capacity on the Pennsylvania Navy Galley Ranger. On 15 April 1777 he was promoted to Second Lieutenant and was assigned to the Pennsylvania Navy Galley Dickinson (HENDERSON). [NOAR, 200]


McCLEAN, LAUGHLAN

PA

Captain, Pennsylvania Navy


Laughlan McClean was commissioned as Captain in the Pennsylvania Navy on 3 May 1777 and assigned to the Pennsylvania Navy Galley Dickinson. [NOAR, 200]


McCLEAVE, JOHN

CT

Captain, Connecticut Navy

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


John McCleave was a resident of New Haven, Connecticut. [NRAR, 494] He was commissioned as a Captain in the Connecticut Navy and assigned to the Connecticut Navy Galley Whiting in the summer of 1776. In the fall of 1776 he was captured, but apparently escaped. [NOAR, 200] On 9 November 1776 he was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Wooster. [NRAR, 494] He had apparently left the Wooster by May 1777. [NDAR, VIII, 1020]


McCLEAVE, J.

[see MCILNOE, JOHN]


McCLELLAN, ARTHUR

Master, Massachusetts Privateers

Master, Massachusetts Navy


Arthur McClellan was aboard Massachusetts Privateer Sloop Retrieve (Commander JOSHUA STONE) as (sailing) Master on 29 August 1776. She was at sea in September 1776, capturing one prize. On 30 September Retrieve was captured by HM Frigate Milford and taken into Halifax. The prisoners were exchanged by November 1776. [see Retrieve] McClellan was then appointed master of the Massachusetts Navy Schooner Boston and ordered to the West Indies on 6 January 1777 by the Massachusetts Board of War. [NOAR, 203] He was master of the brig Industry on 4 December 1777, when she was captured by HM Frigate Milford and taken into Halifax, Nova Scotia. [NDAR, 10: 662 and note]


McCLENACHAN, BLAIR

PA

Owner, Pennsylvania Privateers


On 3 September 1777 McClenachan sold two vessels to the Continental forces in the Delaware River, possibly to be used as fire ships, for $16400. He was paid on 28 November 1777. [NDAR 10: 625-627 and 627 note]

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

3/28/77

PA

Brigantine Chance (10/35)

John McIlnoe

Blair McClenachan

 

[NDAR 10: 677-678 and 678 note]

6/19/77

PA

Brig Industry (14/45)

Hugh Lysle

Blair McClenachan, John Pringle

 

[NDAR 10:882-884 and 884-885 note]

 

PA

Brigantine Hetty (10/)

Joseph Ashbourn

John Pringle, Blair McClenachan

 

[NDAR 10: 1066 and note]

5/29/82

PA

Schooner Adventure (4/9)

Matthew Strong

Joseph Carson and Blair McClenachan et al

Matthew Strong, Joseph Carson

[NRAR, 222]


McCLENACHAN, JOHN

PA

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


John McClenachan was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, [NRAR, 289, 351, 444] and was born about 1757. [NOAR, 201]. McClenachan served as a bonder for the Pennsylvania Privateer Brig Richmond (Commander JOHN CUMMINGS) on 20 September 1779. [NRAR, 444] He was commissioned, on 26 July 1781, to the Pennsylvania Privateer Brigantine [NRAR, 351] Industry. On 19 July 1782 he was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Ship Fame, [NRAR, 289] listing his age as 24. [NOAR, 200-201]


McCLEUER, WILLIAM

First Mate, [Pennsylvania Privateers]


William McCleuer (McClure) was First Mate on the Morning Star, probably one of the two Pennsylvia Privateers by that name. He was captured by the British and committed to Forton Prison on 9 August 1781. [NOAR, 201]


McCLURE, JAMES

VA/(P)

Lieutenant of Marines, Continental Marines


Commissioned 25 June 1776, according to NOAR, 201.


McCLURE, JOHN

VA

Commander, Virginia Privateers


John McClure was probably a resident of Richmond, Virginia. He was commissioned to the Virginia Privateer Schooner Hunter on 20 Srptember 1781. [NRAR, 347]


McCLURE, RICHARD

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


From Virginia according to NOAR, 201. Continental Navy according to Allen.


McCLURE, WILLIAM

[see McCLEUER, WILLIAM]


McCLURE, WILLIAM

MA

Captain, Massachusetts Navy


William McClure was in command of the Massachusetts Navy Brigantine Rising Empire, a prison ship anchored in Boston Harbor, on 24 December 1777. [NDAR 10: 793 and note]


McCLURG, WALTER

VA

Surgeon, Continental Navy


According to NOAR, 201.


McCOBB, SAMUEL

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Samuel McCobb was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Minerva on 11 February 1780. [Allen, Massachusetts Privateers of the Revolution, 221]


McCORNEY, WILLIAM

CT

First Mate, Connecticut Privateers


William McCorney was aboard the Connecticut Privateer Brigantine Marshall (Commander NOAH SCOVELL) as First Mate on 6 March 1783. [NOAR, 201] During the following cruise the brigantine Hope was captured. [see Marshall


McCOY [McCAY], JAMES

PA

Second Lieutenant, Pennsylvania Navy

Commander, Maryland Privateers


James McCoy [NOAR, 201] [McCay] [NRAR, 477] was commissioned in the Pennsylvania Navy as a Second Lieutenant on 4 October 1776 and assigned to the Pennsylvania Navy Galley Experiment. [NOAR, 201] He was commissioned to the Maryland Privateer Brigantine Trooper on 24 July 1780. [NRAR, 477]


McCOLLOCK, WILLIAM

VA

[Commander, Virginia Privateers]


William McCollock was the “master” of the Virginia vessel Dove, captured by the British. She was taken into New York and converted to the British Privateer Resolution. About Christmas 1780 she was captured by the Continental Navy Ship Saratoga, and then recaptured by the Bridgett. [NOAR, 201]


McCREA, STEPHEN

NY

Surgeon, Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron


Stephen McCrea was a Surgeon aboard one of Arnold’s galleys on 23 August 1776. [NOAR, 201]


McCREERY, WILLIAM

Owner, Maryland Privateers


William McCreery was a merchant of Maryland and a part-owner of the Maryland Privateer Schooner Swallow (Commander JOHN MARTIN) McCreery arrived in Bordeaux, France in the Swallow on 3 September 1777, bringing dispatches to the American Commissioners in France. He traveled to Paris, delivered the dispatches and returned to Bordeaux. [NDAR 10: 942-945 and 945 note; 990-991 and 991 note] Swallow helped captured the Emperor of Germany on 11 November 1777, which resulted in difficulties for McCreery at Bordeaux. [see Swallow]

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

7/23/77

MD

Schooner Swallow (†/15)

John Martin

Samuel and Robert Purviance

John Martin, John Davidson

[NRAR, 469]


McCULLOCH, DAVID [EDWARD]

[See McCULLOUGH, DAVID]


M’CULLOGH, DAVID [EDWARD]

[See McCULLOUGH, DAVID]


McCULLOGH, DAVID [EDWARD]

[See McCULLOUGH, DAVID]


McCULLOCK, DAVID [EDWARD]

[See McCULLOUGH, DAVID]


McCULLOUGH [McCULLOCK, McCULLOCH, McCULLOGH, M’CULLOGH], DAVID [EDWARD]

PA

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


David [Edward] McCullogh [McCullock, McCulloch, McCullogh, M’Cullough] was born about 1735. [NOAR, 201-202] He was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Schooner Rattlesnake about December 1776. Before 5 April 1777, sailing with the Pennsylvania Privateer Schooner Security (Commander John Ord, Jr.), the Rattlesnake was said to have taken and sent into St. Eustatius two ships from Cork. Another six or seven sail from Cork were sent into Martinique, as well as some ships from Africa with slaves. [NDAR, VIII, 411-413 and 413 note] The two sent into St. Eustatius were further identified as two transports, and the others as nine transports and two slaving vessels. [NDAR, VIII, 429] The Rattlesnake was a noted "runner" and was making a reputation as the terror of the British islands. [NDAR, VIII, 430] On 14 May 1777 it was reported that she had taken eight prizes since sailing from Pennsylvania, and five had gotten into safe ports. [NDAR, VIII, 965-966] Not everything went McCullough’s way: the ship John (M'Cartin) was en route from Liverpool to St. Vincent's when she encountered the Rattlesnake. John managed to beat the privateer off, inflicting a dangerous shot in her bow. M'Cartin reported the privateer to be armed with sixteen guns. [NDAR, VIII, 871] She was reported to be at Martinique in the period between 23 February and 15 March 1777. [NDAR, VIII, 81] McCullough was sighted and chased by HM Sloop Beaver (Commander James Jones) on 17 May 1777, between St. Vincent's and St. Lucia. [NDAR, VIII, 999] Jones reported that calm weather allowed her to escape by using her sweeps. [NDAR, IX, 545] In early June 1777 Rattlesnake was at St. Pierre, Martinique. [NDAR, IX, 93] She was off Barbadoes on 8 September 1777, in chase of a vesssel. She was then reported as armed with fourteen guns and noted as an excellent sailer, having taken a "prodigious" number of prizes. McCulloch was said to be the "boldest fellow" seen in the West Indies in some time. "Bets used to be often laid at Martinico, relative to the captures the above little vessel would bring into any of the respective harbours. People would be looking out for her; and on her appearance with a prize, the joyful alarm was, Le Sepent a Sonnettes! -- The beach would then be crowded with spectators, and the Rattlesnake enter the harbor in triumph." [NDAR, IX, 899 and note] Rattlesnake was eventually captured by the British. McCulloch was confined in Forton Prison on 15 April 1778, and escaped. [NOAR, 201-202] On 25 [28] September 1781 McCullough was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Boat Spy. [NRAR, 462] McCullough listed his age as forty at this time, [NOAR, 201-202]


McCULLOUGH, JOSEPH

PA

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


Joseph McCullough was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Brig George on 4 November 1780. [NRAR, 316]


McCURDY, JOHN

[See McKIRDY, JOHN]


McDANIEL, TIMOTHY

MA

Second Lieutenant, Massachusetts Privateers


Timothy McDaniel was Second Lieutenant aboard the Massachusetts Privateer Ship General Mifflin (Commander WILLIAM DAY), when she was at Boston, Massachusetts on 29 November 1777. [NDAR 10: 629 and note]


McDOUGALL, JOHN

PA

Second Lieutenant, Continental Navy


John McDougall was a Second Lieutenant in the Continental Navy, aboard the Continental Navy Ship Randolph (Captain Nicholas Biddle). He was killed on 7 March 1778 during the action with HMS Yarmouth.


McELROY, GEORGE

[see McAROY, GEORGE]


McFADEN [McFADIN], WILLIAM

PA

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


William McFaden [NRAR. 385] [McFadin] [NOAR, 202] was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [NRAR, 385] He was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Sloop Mars on 4 August 1778. [NRAR, 385] He was next commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Ship Admiral Zoutman on 14 January 1782. [NRAR, 220]


McFADIN, WILLIAM

[See McFADEN, WILLIAM]


McFATRIDGE [McFATRICH, McFETRICH], JOHN

PA

Captain, Pennsylvania Navy

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


John McFatridge [McFatrich, McFetrich] was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [NRAR, 427] He was commissioned as a Captain in the Pennsylvania Navy in 1776 and assigned to the Pennsylvania Navy Galley Washington. On 21 February 1779 he was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Schooner Rambler.  [NRAR, 427]


McFEE, MATTHEW

PA

[First] Mate, Pennsylvania Privateers


Matthew McFee was born about 1759. [NOAR, 202] He was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. On 12 June 1781 he was [First] Mate on the Pennsylvania Privateer Buckskin (Commander BENJAMIN WICKES). [NRAR, 244] He listed his age as 22. [NOAR, 202]


McHARRON, CHARLES

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


McHELL, JOHN

[See McKEEL, JOHN]


McHENRY, MATTHEW [MATHEY]

PA

Surgeon, Pennsylvania Navy


Matthew (Mathey) McHenry was Surgeon in the Pennsylvania Navy, assigned to the Pennsylvania Navy Ship Montgomery on 13 April 1776. [NOAR, 202]


McILNOE [McCLEAVE], JOHN

PA

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


John McIlnoe was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [NRAR, 221] He was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Brigantine Chance on 28 March 1777. It is known that Chance was at Martinique, French West Indies late in 1777. On 6 December 1777 Continental Agent William Bingham reported shipping part of a Continental cargo aboard the Chance, noting she was bound for North Carolina, or some other United States port. [NDAR 10: 677-678 and 678 note] McIlnoe was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Schooner Adventure on 20 June 1779. [NRAR, 221]


McIVERS, JOHN

Lieutenant, Continental Navy


MACKAY, ALEXANDER

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Alexander Mackay was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. [NRAR, 229] His first command was the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine George, commissioned 7 September 1779. [NOAR, 192] On 9 October 1781 he was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Peacock. [NRAR, 412] He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Apollo on 13 December 1782. [NRAR, 229]


MACKAY, MUNGO

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Mungo Mackay was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was frequently connected with Thomas Dennie in privateering interests. Privateers which Mackay was associated with, as owner or bonder, were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

10/18/79

MA

Ship Tartar (20/130)

David Porter

Mungo Mackay

David Porter, Samuel Dunn, Jr., Mungo Mackay

Thomas Porter, Mungo Mackay, Jr. [Allen, MPR, 295]

10/2/80

MA

Ship Aurora (10/20)

David Porter

Mungo Mackay et al

David Porter, Mungo Mackay, Thomas Dennie

Ezekiel Burroughs, Benjamin Tetard [NRAR, 231]

10/2/80

MA

Brigantine Hope (4/10)

Ezekiel Burroughs

Mungo Mackay

Ezekiel Burroughs, Mungo Mackay, Thomas Dennie

Benjamin Tetard, David Porter [NRAR, 340]

3/14/82

MA

Ship Moore (14/40)

Ezekiel Burroughs

Mungo Mackay

Ezekiel Burroughs, Mungo Mackay, Samuel Dunn, Jr.

Joseph Coolidge, Samuel Prince [NRAR, 397]

2/10/83

MA

Schooner Hazard (4/14)

Samuel Barnes

Mungo Mackay et al

Samuel Barnes, Mungo Mackay, Thomas Dennie

Peter Boyer, Jr. [NRAR, 332]

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

1/15/79

MA

Brigantine Adventure (8/30)

Joseph Tripp

Nathaniel Greene et al

Joseph Tripp, Mungo Mackay, [Nathaniel Greene]

[Allen, MPR, 67-68]

10/2/82

MA

Ship Apollo (10/20)

Henry Skinner

Thomas Dennie et al

Henry Skinner, Thomas Dennie, Mungo Mackay

David Porter, Thomas Porter [NRAR, 229]

1/14/82

MA

Ship Apollo (10/25)

Bradbury Sanders

Thomas Dennie et al

Bradbury Sanders, Mungo Mackay, Thomas Dennie

Francis Bryant, William Payne [NRAR, 229]

As witness:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

2/14/81

MA

Brigantine Flora (14/25)

Elisha Turner

Joseph Baldesqui, John Cormerais

Elisha Turner, John Cormerais, Joseph Baldesqui

Mungo Mackay, Alexander Mackay [NRAR, 294]

10/9/81

MA

Brigantine Ranger (8/15)

Thomas Simmons

Daniel Sargent et al

Thomas Simmons, Daniel Sargent, Samuel Brown

Mungo Mackay, Nathaniel Barber [NRAR, 430]

7/20/82

MA

Brigantine Lady Washington (6/15)

William White

John Codman, Samuel Dunn et al

William White, John Codman, Jr., Samuel Dunn, Jr.

Mungo Mackay, Jr., William Palfrey [NRAR, 367]

12/10/82

MA

Schooner Plough (4/20)

Magnes Harvey

Samuel A. Otis, Elisha Doane

Magnes Harvey, Samuel A. Otis, Elisha Doane

Benjamin Sumner, Jr., Mungo Mackay, Jr. [NRAR, 416]


McKEEL [McHELL], JOHN

MD

Commander, Maryland Privateers


John McKeel [McHell] was a resident of Baltimore, Maryland. He was commissioned to the Maryland Privateer Brigantine Sturdy Beggar on 19 November 1776. [NRAR, 465] Under McKeel Sturdy Beggar made a cruise to the West Indies in early 1777. She was at sea on 2 February 1777, when, at 17°12'N, 48°24'W, ship Elizabeth (Joseph Snowball) was taken. [NDAR, 9: 179] During this cruise four slavers and “many other valuable prizes” were captured. [NDAR, 9: 108] She was at Martinique on 9 April 1777. [Jamieson, Alan G., “American Privateers in the Leeward Islands, 1776-1778,” in The American Neptune, [volume unknown], reprinting a table from CO 101/20] About this time that Sturdy Beggar put into Hispaniola. Evidently some prizes were sold there, and the crew of the brig demanded the payment of the full amount of their prize money. The skipper refused, stating that the shipping articles called for the full amount to be paid only in Baltimore. What happened next is not clear. Sturdy Beggar sailed for North Carolina, but whether McKeel was aboard or remained in Hispaniola is unclear. [NDAR 10: 389-390] Sturdy Beggar had arrived at Ocracoke Bar before 13 June 1777. [NDAR, 9: 108] From North Carolina members of Sturdy Beggar’s crew went up to Baltimore. Their complaints were loud and long against McKeel, who was not present. The owners heard the “Tongue of Calumny busy in traducing your Character” concerning McKeel’s proceedings at Hispanioa. The owners suspected it was no fault of McKeel’s. However, with the crew returned to Baltimore and spreading their malicious reports, the owners believed the privateer would not be manned under McKeel. The owners later said the only reason for appointing another commander was “on Account of the Clamour raised against You . . . which rendered it impossible to procure another Crew to Man the Vessel . . .” The owners had to send a crew to Carolina. Meanwhile McKeel returned to Baltimore. He gave his accounts to the owners who were satisfied with his actions at Hispaniola. The owners furnished McKeel a letter of reference, which he had published in the Baltimore newspapers on 3 November 1777, clearing him of the aspersions cast by his former crew. [NDAR 10: 389-390]


McKENZIE, JAMES

SC

Commander, South Carolina Privateers


James McKenzie was commissioned on 26 November 1776 [NDAR, VII, 467-468] to the South Carolina Privateer Sloop Betsey. She was active in 1777. [Coker, 300]


McKIRDY [McCURDY], JOHN

MD

Commander, Maryland Privateers


John McKirdy [McCurdy] was a resident of Baltimore, Maryland. He was commissioned to the Maryland Privateer Schooner Dove on 13 March 1780. [NRAR, 276]


McKNIGHT, JAMES

PA

Lieutenant, Pennsylvania Navy


James McKnight was a Lieutenant in the Pennsylvania Navy, assigned to the Pennsylvania Navy Fire Ship Strumbello on 10 March 1777. Died 1802. [NOAR, 203]


McKOWEN [McKOWN], ROBERT

CT

Master, Connecticut Privateers


Robert McKowen [McKown] was [sailing] Master on the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Hibernia (Commander SAMUEL SMEDLEY) on 10 October 1780. The Hibernia was captured by HM Frigate Hussar on 25 October and taken into New York. McKowen was sent to England and committed to Old Mill Prison in March 1781. [NOAR, 203]


McKOWN, ROBERT

[See McKOWEN, ROBERT]


McLEAN [McNEAL], LAUGHLIN

PA

First Lieutenant, Pennsylvania Navy


Laughlin McLean [McNeal] was commissioned as a First Lieutenant in the Pennsylvania Navy and assigned to the Pennsylvania Navy Galley Warren on 1 November 1776. [NOAR, 203]


McLELLAN, ARTHUR

[See McCLELLAN, ARTHUR]


McLELLAN, SAMUEL

MA

Captain, [unknown] Navy


Born 1747. Captain in Navy, according to NOAR, 203. Died 1778.


McLELLAN, WILLIAM

MA

First Lieutenant, Massachusetts Privateers


William McLellan was aboard Massachusetts Privateer Sloop Retrieve (Commander JOSHUA STONE) as First Lieutenant on 29 August 1776. She was at sea in September 1776, capturing one prize. On 30 September Retrieve was captured by HM Frigate Milford and taken into Halifax. The prisoners were exchanged by November 1776. [see Retrieve]


McLEOD [McLOAD], DAVID

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


David McLeod [McLoad] was a resident of Newvuryport and Boston, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Favorite on 21 September 1779. [NOAR, 203]


McLEVER, ROBERT



Robert McLever was an officer on an American privateer. He was assigned as Prize Master of the Reprisal, which was re-captured by the British. On 9 August 1777 he was committed to Forton Prison. McLever later escaped. [NOAR, 203]


McLOAD, DAVID

[See McLEOD, DAVID]


McLURE, JOHN

MD

Owner, Maryland Privateers


John McLure was a resident of Baltimore, Maryland. He was associated with JOSEPH and THOMAS YEATES in privateering. Vessels associated with McLure were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

5/9/80

MD

Schooner Laurens (8/18)

William Wand

John McLure, Thomas Yeates

William Wand, David McMeehan

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 370]

9/11/80

MD

Schooner Luzerne (6/17)

Peter Sharpe

John McLure, Joseph Yeates

Peter Sharpe, John Davidson

William Hyde [NRAR, 379]


McNEAL, LAUGHLIN

[See McLEAN, LAUGHLIN]


McNEAL, ROBERT

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


McNEILL, DANIEL

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Daniel McNeill of Boston, Massachusetts was commissioned to he Massachusetts Privateer Schooner America on 16 April 1777 [NDAR, VIII, 350-351; Allen, Massachusetts Privateers of the Revolution, 70] although she was fitting out at Boston as early as 9 September 1776, when the owners petitioned the Massachusetts Council for permission to buy gunpowder from the state. [Allen, Massachusetts Privateers of the Revolution, 70] On 19 April 1777 America's owners proposed that the schooner sail with the Continental frigates. [NDAR, VIII, 375-376] She sailed with the frigates and eight other privateers on 21 May 1777. [NDAR, VIII, 1006-1007] America helped chase a vessel off Portsmouth, New Hampshire on 24 May, but she turned out to be an American. [NDAR, VIII, 1023-1024] She took a ship with rum, sugar, wine and logwood in October 1777. [Maclay, History of American Privateers, 7] Subsequently, when some owners complained that prize proceeds from the joint voyage were not shared properly, the Massachusetts General Court ordered America’s bond prosecuted. [NDAR,  X, 200-201 and 202 note] America was among the privateers whose bonds would thus be prosecuted. On 15 December 1777, Thomas Harris, an agent and owner of the America and NcNeill, her commander, requested the Massachusetts House of Representatives to appoint a committee to settle this matter, without going to the courts. On 13 January 1778 the House of Representatives asked the courts to suspend action in the case to allow the various parties to work out a settlement. [NDAR, X, 738 and note]


McNEIL, HECTOR

(P)

Captain, Continental Navy

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Hector McNeil was born in County Antrim, Ireland in 1728. He was commissioned a Captain in the Continental Navy on 17 April 1776 and put in command of Continental Navy Frigate Boston. McNeil sailed in John Manley's squadron in 1777, participating in the battle with HM Frigate Fox, and in the Action of 7 July 1777 with HM Frigate Rainbow, in which Manley's vessel was captured. For his conduct during this battle McNeil was court-martialed and cashiered. On 22 May 1780 he was appointed to command the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Pallas. [NOAR, 204] McNeil was then commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Adventure. [NRAR, 221] He died at sea in 1785. [NOAR, 204]


MacPHERSON [McPHERSON], JOHN

Captain, Pennsylvania Navy

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers

Owner, Pennsylvania Privateers


John Macpherson was a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, [NRAR, 228] born about 1725. [NOAR, 192] Macpherson later claimed he was appointed to a commission in the Continental Navy on 17 October 1775, and attempted to claim his pay on 31 May 1776. On 28 March 1778 he was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Navy [unknown] Perseverence. While this was a privateer bond, the owner was listed as the state of Pennsylvania. [NRAR, 413] On 15 June 1779, MacPerson attempted to resurrect his Continental pretensions by petitioning the Continental Congress to allow him to cruise in a prize ship captured by the Continental Navy Ship Boston. [NRAR, 108] On 2 July 1779 MacPherson again petitioned the Continental Congress. He now wanted to borrow two cannon owned by the United States but not in use. MacPherson proposed to use them on three privateers (Tyger, Cat, Jackall [see below])he had fitted out. The petition was referred to the Board of War, which allowed MacPherson the use of one cannon. [NRAR, 109] MacPherson was back on 20 July, requesting gunpowder from the Congress. The request was granted the next day. [NRAR, 111] The Continental Congress next heard from MacPherson on 6 January 1781. John Wharton had resigned from the Continental Navy Board of the Middle District and MacPherson petitioned for his place as a Commissioner of the Navy Board. Congress ignored him. [NRAR, 170] He was next commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Boat Anti Traitor on 17 May 1781, a vessel that he owned. [NRAR, 228] He listed his age as 56 in 1781. [NOAR, 192] Privateers associated with MacPherson were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

7/1/79

PA

Sloop Tyger (2/70)

Martin Parkison

John MacPherson

John MacPherson, Robert Patton

James Trimble [NRAR, 481]

7/20/79

PA

Schooner Cat (2/70)

Edward Leger

John MacPherson

John MacPherson, Robert Patton

James Trimble [NRAR, 246]

7/20/79

PA

Schooner Jackall (2/60)

William MacPherson

John MacPherson

John MacPherson, Robert Patton

James Trimble [NRAR, 354]

8/4/79

PA

Schooner Cat (2/70)

John Hasting

John MacPherson

Andrew Caldwell, James Caldwell

James Trimble, Jackson Reynolds [NRAR, 246]

8/4/79

PA

Schooner Jackall (2/60)

Samuel Baker

John MacPherson

Andrew Caldwell, James Caldwell

James Trimble, Jackson Reynolds [NRAR, 354]

8/12/79

PA

Schooner Jackall (2/70)

William Barton

John MacPherson

John MacPherson, Robert Patton

James Trimble [NRAR, 354]

8/14/79

PA

Schooner Cat (2/70)

Joseph Campbell

John MacPherson

Andrew Caldwell, James Caldwell

James Trimble, Jackson Reynolds [NRAR, 247]

5/17/81

PA

Boat Anti Traitor (2/40)

John MacPherson

John MacPherson & Co.

John MacPherson, Thomas Nevell

John Bransby, James Trimble [NRAR, 228]


MADISON, GABRIEL

VA

Captain of Marines, Virginia Marines


Gabriel Madison was a native of Hanover County and a brother of Captain Rowland Madison and George Madison, later Governor of Kentucky. [Stewart, 219-220] Madison was commissioned as a Lieutenant of Marines on 11 June 1776, in Captain of Marines THOMAS MITCHELL’s company. On 10 October 1776 he filled his quota of men [NOAR, 192] He remained a Lieutenant of Marines until 1779 when he was discharged because of a severe wound in his right leg. He later served as a captain under General George Rogers Clarke, and was slightly wounded at the Battle of Blue Licks. He married on 12 December 1784, to a woman named Myra. The couple moved to Kentucky. Madison died on 15 April 1804. [Stewart, 219-220]


MAGEE, JAMES

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


James Magee was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Brig Amsterdam on 31 May 1779. Magee took the Amsterdam on a cruise to Amsterdam in The Netherlands, where he participated in Fourth of July festivities and had his vessel inspected by Dutch navy officers. Magee was re-commissioned to the Amsterdam on 22 February 1780. Magee then made cruises and voyages to Pennsylvania, and twice to Sweden. He was captured, with the brig, on 19 October 1781. Magee was soon released and was in Massachusetts by early November 1781. [see Amsterdam]


MAIR, WILLIAM

MA

Second Lieutenant, Massachusetts Privateers


William Mair served aboard the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Vagrant (Commander JOHN CONWAY) as Second Lieutenant. Vagrant was commissioned on 14 October 1778. [see Vagrant]


MAIN [MAINS], WILLIAM

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


When Massachusetts Privateer Brig Yankee Hero (Commander JAMES TRACY) was commissioned on 20 February 1776, a man named Main [NDAR, VI, 126-128, 778-780] or Mains [NDAR, V, 507-508] served aboard her as First Lieutenant. [NDAR, VI, 126-128, 778-780] This was probably William Main, a native of Newburyport, the home port of the Yankee Hero. [Claghorn, 193] Main was in the battle with HM Frigate Milford, on 6 June 1776, and was wounded and captured. He was eventually taken to Halifax. [NDAR, VI, 126-128, 778-780] Main was presumably exchanged in November 1776, for he was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer [unknown] Bilboa Packet in that month. [Claghorn, 193]


MALLET, MICHAEL

PA

Owner, Maryland Privateers

Owner, Pennsylvania Privateers


Michael Mallet was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was invariably associated with his business partner, JAMES LACAZE, in privateering. Vessels associated with Mallet were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

9/9/80

MD

Schooner Young Neptune (16/30)

Gilbert de La Roche

Lacaze and Mallet

G. de La Roche, John Muir

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 495]

1/16/81

PA

Schooner Neptune (10/21)

Gabriel Lallement

James Lacaze, Michael Mallet

Gabriel Lallement, Michael Mallet

James Trimble [NRAR, 403]

3/8/81

PA

Brigantine Impromptu (4/14)

Jeremie Peaud

James Lacaze, Michael Mallet

Michael Mallet, Jeremie Peaud

D. Woelpper, James Trimble [NRAR, 349]

6/19/81

PA

Brigantine Nympha (6/20)

Peter Briamant

James Lacaze, Michael Mallet

Peter Briamant, Michael Mallet

James Trimble [NRAR, 407]

9/25/81

PA

Sloop Polly (4/4)

Joseph Buisson

James Lacaze, Michael Mallet

Joseph Buisson, Lacaze & Mallet

Lacoste, James Murphy [NRAR, 418]

3/30/82

PA

Brigantine L’Antoinette (6/21)

William Smith

James Lacaze, Michael Mallet

Lacaze & Mallet, William Smith

James Trimble [NRAR, 228]


MALKIN [MALOON]

 

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Massachusetts Privateer [Brig or Sloop] Vagrant was in service in August 1778 under one Malkin or Maloon. One MOSES WING served as Surgeon on this privateer. [Massachusetts Society of the Sons of the American Revolution: Register of Members, April 19, 1907, and Records of their Revolutionary Ancestors with the Constitution and By Laws and Proceedings of the Society and Managers, F. A. Baggette Company: Springfield, 1907, 191] Alternatively, the privateer is listed as the sloop Vagrant, and the master as Maloon [perhaps Malone]. [http://worldcupcafe.pbworks.com/Moses+Wing+I1000000]


MALOON

 

See MALKIN


MANIFOLD, PETER

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


MANLEY [MANLY], JOHN

MA/(P)

Captain, Continental Navy

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Massachusetts Privateer Ship Cumberland was commissioned on 14 December 1778 under Manley. Cumberland was a big 290-ton privateer with twenty guns and a crew of 150 men. [Allen, MPR, 106] A man who sailed aboard her states she was armed with eighteen 6-pounders and carried a crew of 130 men. [Greenwood, Young Patriot, 97] Cumberland sailed in early January 1779. [Maclay, Privateers, 192-193] Manley’s intention was to cruise off the island of Barbados, intercepting the homeward bound West Indies traffic. About 22 or 23 January 1779, the Cumberland encountered a British transport ship, dismasted in a storm, while running from St. Johns, Newfoundland to Halifax, Nova Scotia.  She was rolling “like a hogshead, keel out,” when the Americans caught her. Aboard was some clothing, wine and several British soldiers (recruits for the Nova Scotia Volunteers). The clothing and wine were removed, a prize master appointed, and jury masts rigged. The prize was dispatched to Martinique. [Greenwood, Young Patriot, 97] She was recaptured, when close to Martinique, by HM Frigate Venus (Captain William P. Williams). [Greenwood, Young Patriot, 114n3, 183n28] On the late afternoon of 25 January Cumberland made Barbados, sailing near enough to see the three signal flagstaffs at Bridge Town. Cumberland stood off during the night. At 0700 a vessel was seen bearing down on the Cumberland, with steering sails set. They were then about thirty miles to windward of the island. Manley set all sail and stood for her. She proved to be HM Frigate Pomona (some accounts say the Juno) (Captain William Waldegrave), with thirty-six 9-pounders and 12-pounders and a crew of 300 men. Manley ran for it with Pomona in hot pursuit. The chase lasted all day, with shots exchanged along the way. A least one American was killed during the chase. As night came on Manley dumped eight of his guns and started his water. The frigate came up, gave the Cumberland four or five shots, and ordered Manley to “strike your d . . . d rebel colors.” Manley mustered his men for a boarding attempt expecting the vessels to collide, but there were not enough arms aboard. Manley had no choice but to strike. The crew was removed to the Pomona and taken into Barbados, where they were confined in the jail. [Greenwood, Young Patriot, 98-101, 183n28. The British date the capture as 29 January 1779] Cumberland was also sent into Barbados. The prisoners were treated rather severely. Manley managed to bribe the jailer and got out of prison with his officers at night. They seized a government tender, put her crew in irons, and escaped to the United States. [Maclay, History of American Privateers, 192-193]


MANN, PHILIP

First Mate, Maryland Privateers


Philip Mann, possibly of Annapolis, Maryland, was appointed as First Mate on the Maryland Privateer Sloop Adriana (Commander Joseph Vesey), commissioned 8 October 1778. [NRAR, 220]


MANNING, THOMAS

NH

Commander, New Hampshire Privateers


Thomas Manning was a resident of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. He was commissioned to the New Hampshire Privateer Ship Bellona on 11 October 1781. Bellona was captured about February 1782 by a British cruiser and taken in to Charlston, South Carolina. [see Bellona]


MANSFIELD, GILES

CT

Captain, Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron


Giles Mansfield was from Connecticut and resided in New Haven. [NRAR, 387; Claghorn, 195] He was at Crown Point on 18 August 1776, in command of the Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron Gondola New Haven. [NDAR, 6, 224] Mansfield apparently departed rather soon after the naval campaign ended, for on 26 November 1776 he was in command of the sloop Mary, bound from New Haven to St. Eustatia. [NDAR, 7, 293-294] On 27 November Mary was commissioned as the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Mary, with six guns and a crew of thirty-two, and Mansfield as her commander. [NRAR, 387] Mary was captured in the West Indies by an uncommissioned British privateer and taken into Antigua, where she was condemned on 28 January 1777. [NDAR, 7, 1055-1058] Mansfield made his way to Martinique, fitted out a ten gun cruiser, and captured a ship from England to Honduras, taking his prize into Martinique (before 13 August 1777). [NDAR, 9, 741] He was captured again, with his "ship" on 14 March 1777, near Martinique. [Claghorn, 195]


MARBLE, ISAAC

NH

Owner, New Hampshire Privateers


Isaac Marble was a resident of Exeter, New Hampshire. He was associated with the following vessels:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

12/2/76

NH

Schooner Adventure (4/16)

James Johnson

John Taylor Gilman, William Elliot, Isaac Marble

John Taylor Gilman, William Elliot, Isaac Marble, James Johnson

Jonathan Blanchard, John Wentworth [NRAR, 221]


MARKHAM, JAMES

VA

Captain, Virginia Navy


On 1 April 1776 the Virginia Committee of Safety appointed James Markham as a Captain in the Virginia Navy and assigned him to the second galley building in the Rappahannock River. This was the galley that eventually was named the Page. [NDAR, “Minutes of the Virginia Committee of Safety,” IV, 621. Note: Markham is not to be confused with John Marsden, as Stewart, Virginia’s Navy, 12note apparently does.] On 20 July 1776 by the Virginia Council of Safety. Issued commissions to galley Page: James Markham, Captain, John Lurty, First Lieutenant, Henry Lightbourn, Second Lieutenant. [NDAR, “Journal of the Virginia Council of Safety,” V, 1164 and notes] Dates of active service 20 July.


MARONY, WILLIAM

see MORONY, WILLIAM


MARQUAND, JOSEPH

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Joseph Marquand was a resident of Boston and Newburyport, Massachusetts. Vessels associated with Marquand were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

3/19/82

MA

Ship Cyrus (12/45)

John O’Brien

Joseph Marquand, John Coffin Jones

John O’Brien, Joseph Marquand, John Jenkins

[NRAR, 261]


MARSH, JOHN

MA

Prize Master, Massachusetts Privateers


John Marsh was listed as a prize master on the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Pilgrim (Commander JOSEPH ROBINSON) on 14 August 1780.[Howe, Beverly Privateers, 414]


MARTIN, DANIEL

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Daniel Martin was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was associated in privateering with THOMAS ADAMS and PAUL DUDLEY SARGENT. Vessels associated with Martin were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

4/24/77

MA

Schooner Buckram (8/45)

William Morony

Daniel Martin, Thomas Adams

William Morony, Thomas Adams, Paul Dudley Sargent

Timothy Foster [NDAR, VIII, 417-418; Allen, MPR, 88]

6/4/77

MA

Schooner Buckram (8/45)

Thomas Snoden

Daniel Martin, Thomas Adams

Thomas Snoden, Daniel Martin, Thomas Adams

Timothy Foster, William Lawrence [Allen, MPR, 89]


MARTIN, HENRY

PA

Captain, Pennsylvania Navy

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


Henry Martin was born about 1739. [NOAR, 196] He was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [NRAR, 340] Martin was commissioned as Second Lieutenant aboard the Pennsylvania Navy Galley Dickinson on 6 March 1776. On 1 October 1776 he was promoted to First Lieutenant and transferred to Pennsylvania Navy Galley Washington. He was promoted again on 6 March 1777, to Captain, and assigned to the Pennsylvania Navy Boat Lion. [Jackson, 342. NOAR, 196, indicates his date of commission as 1 May 1777.] Martin served in the Lion through the Delaware River campaign of September-November 1777. He remained with the Lion until she was sold out of service about January 1780. [Jackson, 336, 340-341] Martin was discharged from the Pennsylvania Navy on 13 February 1781. [Jackson, 342] He was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Boat Hooker on 4 June 1781, [NRAR, 340] listing his age as 43. [NOAR, 196] The same day he witnessed the privateer bond for the Pennsylvania Privateer Boat Dreadnought (Commander Henry Darnell). [NRAR, 277]


MARTIN, JEAN DERRIS

SC

Commander, South Carolina Privateers


Jean Derris Martin was in command of the South Carolina Privateer Sloop Recontre in 1777. [Coker, 300]


MARTIN, JOHN

MD

Commander, Maryland Privateers


John Martin was a resident of Baltimore, Maryland. He was commissioned to the Maryland Privateer Schooner Swallow on 23 July 1777. [NRAR, 469]  One of the part owners of the Swallow was William McCreery. When Swallow sailed for Bordeaux, France McCreery was aboard. She arrived there on 3 September 1777. At that time the crew consisted of Martin, his mate, and eight men. From 3 September to the end of October 1777 the schooner was detained by repairs, by McCreery’s going to Paris, and by acquiring a cargo. On 30 October McCreery gave Martin his sailing orders. Since he had a valuable cargo, was deep loaded, and had a short handed crew (some of whom were sick), Martin was to proceed directly to America, speaking no vessel on his passage. Martin sailed from Bordeaux on 1 November. By 6 November 1777 Swallow was anchored in the Gironde River, waiting to sail. In company with her was the New Hampshire Privateer Ship Portsmouth (Commander JOHN HART). Hart had promised to convoy Swallow well offshore. They sailed on 11 November. On the way out the privateers captured the brig Emperor of Germany in French territorial waters, creating a diplomatic incident. Martin claimed a quarter share of the prize. [See Swallow; Portsmouth] Swallow completed her voyage. Martin was commissioned to the Maryland Privateer Brig Otho on 6 July 1781. He made a least one voyage to the West Indies in the Otho, returning to Annapolis on 27 December 1781. [see Otho]


MARTIN, THOMAS

NH

[Owner], New Hampshire Privateers


Thomas Martin, of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, was associated with the following privateers:


Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

1/23/78

NH

Brigantine McClarey (8/50)

JOHN GREGORY

ROBERT FURNIS

Thomas Martin, JACOB TREADWELL

John Wheelwright, Henry Seaward [NRAR, 381]

9/7/80

NH

Ship Diana (10/50)

THOMAS MANNING

Thomas Martin, GEORGE WENTWORTH

THOMAS MANNING, GEORGE WENTWORTH, JOHN PENHALLOW

George King, John Foster [NRAR, 267]

12/23/80

NH

Brigantine Diana 910/30)

HUGH CHISHOLM [CHICHESTER]

Thomas Martin, GEORGE WENTWORTH

HUGH CHISHOLM, NATHANIEL FOLSOM, GEORGE WENTWORTH

John Langdon, Joseph Bass [NRAR, 268]

12/23/80

NH

Ship Diana (10/30)

JOSIAH SHACKFORD

Thomas Martin, GEORGE WENTWORTH

JOSIAH SHACKFORD, Thomas Martin, GEORGE WENTWORTH

George Gains, William Gardner [NRAR, 268]

7/7/81

MA

Schooner Disdain (4/15)

STEPHEN HALL

MATTHEW GRACE & CO.

STEPHEN HALL, BARTHOLOMEW BROWN, MAGNES STEPNEY

Thomas Martin, William Doggett [NRAR, 269]


MARTING, THOMAS

SC

Prizemaster, South Carolina Privateers


Thomas Marting was a Prizemaster aboard the South Carolina Privateer Sloop Vixen (Commander DOWNHAM NEWTON) during her cruise in the Bahama Islands area fro May 1777 to July 1777. When schooner Betsey was captured he was assigned as her prizemaster, on 16 July 1777. Her former skipper was left aboard. The skipper began propagandizing the prize crew and won three of them over. On 22 July, with their help, he recaptured the schooner. On 27 July Betsey arrived at New York with the prize crew as prisoners. [NDAR, IX, 703-704, 950-951]


MASCOLL, STEPHEN

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Stephen Mascoll was a resident of Salem, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Boston Revenge on 7 December 1775, the first regularly commissioned American privateer of the war (see Dolphin). [NDAR, II, 1316 and note] Mascoll captured the ship Jenny in January 1776 [NDAR, III, 993 and note], and left the Boston Revenge by summer of 1776. [NDAR, VI, 345-346 and note] Mascoll was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner General Putnam on 28 August 1776. [Allen, MPR, 151-152] Mascoll was killed in action in January 1777, while General Putnam was engaging the British ships Nancy and Betsy. [NOAR, 198]


MASON, JONATHAN

MA

[Owner], Massachusetts Privateers


Jonathan Mason was a resident of Salem, Massachusetts. Vessels associated with Mason were:

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

6/1/82

MA

Ship Cyrus (10/20)

Jonathan Mason, Jr.

Nathaniel Silsbee et al

Jonathan Mason, Jr., Jonathan Mason, Nathaniel Silsbee

[NRAR, 262]


MASON, JONATHAN, JR.

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Jonathan Mason, Jr. was a resident of Salem, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner True Blue on 16 June 1779, and, on 6 April 1780 to the Massachusetts Privateer Sloop Pomona. Mason was again commissioned, on 3 July 1781, to the Massachusetts Privateer Brig Lion. [NOAR, 198] He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Cyrus on 1 June 1782. [NRAR, 262]


MASSENBURG [MASINBURG], ALEXANDER

VA

Third Lieutenant, Virginia Navy


Alexander Massenburg was a resident of Hampton, Virginia. [Stewart, 222-223] (or Masinburg) was aboard the Virginia Navy Brig Liberty (Captain THOMAS LILLY) by 30 July 1776 [NOAR, 198, where he is said o have commanded the brig.] as a Midshipman. [Stewart, 222-223] On 11 October 1776, a number of officers aboard the Liberty complained about Captain Lilly. Massenburg, now said to be a Master, was among the complainants. [Stewart, 45] He was listed as a Third Lieutenant aboard Virginia Navy Brig Liberty late in 1776. [Stewart, 45 note] He was captured with the Libery (now under Captain JOHN ROGERS) in 1778, by a British vessel and taken to Halifax. He returned to Virginia in 1780. He also served on the Henry (Tompkins) and the Nicholson. He was captured an imprisoned until 1783. He was listed in a pay roll excerpt from the Liberty on 30 July 1777. [Stewart, 222-223]


MASUREY, RICHARD

[see Richard Masury]


MASURY [MASUREY], RICHARD

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Richard Masury [Masurey] was a resident of Salem, Massachusetts. He commanded what almost certainly was the first Massachusetts and American privateer of the Revolution, the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Dolphin. She was at sea before she was commissioned, in mid-November 1775. Sailing out of Salem, Massachusetts, Dolphin made the first privateer capture of the war before 22 November 1775, [NDAR, II, 1098 and note] the sloop Fisher [NDAR, IV, 666-667 and 667 note] Dolphin's owners now petitioned for a commission, on 1 December 1775, [NDAR, II, 1098 and note, 1217] and the Massachusetts Council approved the petition on 8 December.  Dolphin’s Massachusetts bond was not posted until 15 December. [NDAR, II, 1316 and note] Masury captured at least one other prize during December 1775 and January 1776, the sloop Success. [NDAR, IV, 1174-1176; V, 508 and note, 596] Dolphin also captured the sloop Dispatch and the schooner Friendship, [NDAR, V, 508 and note, 596] presumably during April and May 1776. Masury left the Dolphin during the spring or summer of 1776.


MATHUES, ISAAC

Captain, Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron


Isaac Mathues succeeded Captain JOHN PROUT SLOAN as commander of the Continental Army Schooner Liberty on 20 May 1775. [NDAR, "Colonel Benedict Arnold to the Massachusetts Committee of Safety, Cambridge," 1, 512-513 and 513 note] Arnold described Mathues as a "judicious, able" commander on 22 May. [NDAR, "Colonel Benedict Arnold to the Albany Committee of Safety," 1, 503-504 and 504 note] Liberty sailed down to Crown Point on 22 May. [NDAR, "Colonel Benedict Arnold to the Massachusetts Committee of Safety, Cambridge," 1, 512-513 and 513 note] Mathues remained in command of the Liberty until the affair of Arnold's Mutiny, when he presumably left the schooner about 1 July 1775.


MATTHEWMAN, LUKE

First Lieutenant, Continental Navy


Luke Matthewman was First Lieutenant aboard the Continental Navy Sloop Surprize (Captain BENJAMIN DUNN) in late 1777. Matthewman apparently served aboard during the defense of the Delaware River from October-November 1777. He helped intercept some deserters from Continental Navy Xebec Repulse on 20 November. [NDAR, X, 598-601] When Surprize was burned to prevent her capture, on 21 November, Matthewman went up to Bordentown, New Jersey. He testified in the trial of the deserters on 25 November, held on the Lion at Bordentown. [NDAR, X, 598-601]


MATTHEWMAN, WILLIAM

[NY] (P)

Captain, Continental Marines


William Matthewman, presumably a resident of New York, for he was a second lieutenant in the 4th New York from 28 June 1775 to November 1775. [Smith, 455] He was appointed as Captain of Marines aboard the Continental Navy Ship Montgomery by Captain JOHN HODGE on 20 May 1777. [NDAR, IX, 281 and note] He was recommended for a commission by the New York Council of Safety on 25 July 1777. [NDAR, IX, 333-334] Matthewman advertised for a deserter named David Hardy in the New York paper from 8 September to 6 October 1777. [Smith, 455] Matthewman was presumably present when the ship was destroyed to prevent capture by the British during the action at Fort Montgomery, New York on 7 October 1777. Despite the same name, he was probably not a relative of the Navy Lieutenant LUKE MATTHEWMAN. [In NOAR, 199, he is listed as from Maryland, but this seems unlikely.]


MAXWELL, JAMES

VA

Superintendent General of the Shipyard, Virginia Navy

Commissioner of the Navy, Virginia Navy

Captain, Virginia Navy


James Maxwell had been a Master in the Royal Navy, serving aboard HM Frigate Launceston. While this ship was in port in Norfolk, Virginia, he met Helen Calvert, daughter of Maximilian Calvert, mayor [Cross, 36] of Norfolk. They married in 1767. The bride’s father, as a wedding present, gave them a ship called the Two Sisters, with which Maxwell began his merchant marine service. The father-in-law called him an “honest, sensible and industrious man.” [Cross, 38]

On 7 January 1777 Maxwell was appointed by the Virginia Navy Board as “Superintendent General of the Shipyard,” at an annual salary of £300, to supervise the construction and fitting out of its naval vessels. [Cross, 36] In March 1777, when the Virginia Navy Board purchased land on the Chickahominy River to establish a shipyard, Maxwell moved his family there and made it his headquarters. [Cross, 38]

Maxwell wore “a cockade in his hat.” [Stewart, 224]. James Maxwell named Commissioner of the Navy under the Board of War. [Cross, A Navy for Virginia, 53] 30 June 1779. Appointed as Commissioner of the Navy, 3 July 1780 [Stewart, 87]. Attempt to contact French fleet and battle [Stewart, 96-97].

Although the Virginia Assembly virtually disbanded the Virginia Navy in November 1781, specifically eliminating the office of Commissioner of the Navy, [Stewart, 120] Maxwell seems to have continued as a Captain, commanding the Cormorant, [Cross, 79; Stewart, 120] described as a trading vessel. [Stewart, 223] Cormorant and Oliver Cromwell (Harris), serving as troop transports, moved a number of Washington’s troops to head of Elk following the Yorktown siege, where they were subjected to an assesment by Maryland authorities, [Stewart, 121] “contrary to the law of nations,” said Governor of Virginia, who added “A Vessel in pursuit of the enemy would have to stop at the state line, for fear of being treated in so degrading a manner.” [Stewart, 121-122] In May 1782, the Virginia General Assembly appointed three commissioners to superintend the work [Paullin, 415] of protecting the Bay. The Cormorant and Virginia Navy Schooner Liberty to be prepared for this service.[Paullin, 416] Cormorant was assigned a Captain of Marines, JOHN HARDYMAN, who with two Lieutenants of Marines, JOHN CLARK and LEWIS WEBB, began recruiting. Another Lieutenant, JOSEPH or SAMUEL SELDEN, may have been a naval lieutenant. At this time, about May 1782, Cormorant was lying at Hampton, [Stewart, 122] above Broadway and City Point. [Stewart, 223] In October 1782 Cormorant was ordered sold, presumably ending Maxwell’s active service. [Cross, 79; Stewart, 126]. He died about 1795. [Stewart, 224]


MEADE, GEORGE [& CO.]

Owner, Pennsylvania Privateers

Owner, Maryland Privateers


George Meade was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was associated in privateering with THOMAS FITZSIMONS and with THOMAS RUSSELL of Baltimore, Maryland. Vessels associated with Meade were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

11/8/79

PA

Brig Active (14/40)

Thomas Misnard

Thomas Fitzsimons; George Meade & Co.

Thomas Misnard, Thomas Fitzsimons, George Meade

[NRAR, 218]


7/9/81

MD

Schooner Betsey (8/25)

John Brice

George Meade, Thomas Russell

John Brice, John Bullen

[NRAR, 237]

1/19/82

MD

Schooner Betsey (8/25)

John Brice

George Meade, Thomas Russell

  

 

MEADE, STEPHEN

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


MEASE, CALDWELL & CO.

PA

Owner, Pennsylvania Privateers


The firm of Mease, Caldwell & Co. owned privateers. It can be presumed that JOHN MITCHELL and SAMUEL CALDWELL were members of the firm. Vessels associated with Mease, Caldwell & Co. were:


As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Security

Witness

10/5/80

PA

Ship Batchelor (12/)

Bernard Gallagher

Mease, Caldwell & Co.

Samuel Caldwell, John Mitchell

[NRAR, 232]

 

MELALLY, MICHAEL

CT

First Lieutenant, Connecticut Navy


Michael Melally was a merchant marine master who was highly recommended to the Council of Safety by NATHANIEL SHAW, JR., the Connecticut Agent at New London, for a lieutenancy in the Connecticut Navy. He was appointed as First Lieutenant of the Connecticut Navy Ship Oliver Cromwell on 27 August 1776, [NDAR, 6, 316 and note] succeeding TIMOTHY PARKER. In April 1776 he escorted the high ranking prisoners from Commodore ESEK HOPKINS' New Providence Expedition (Governor Montfort Browne and James Babbage) to their place of confinement and returned to New London, where his expenses of L35.0.1 were paid by Shaw. [NDAR, 6, 655-657, 1061 and note] Melally was present on 25 February 1777, according to the crew list. [NDAR, 7, 1283-1287] Melally was one of those officers who roomed and boarded ashore during the time the ship was fitting out, from about 28 August 1776 to 12 December 1776. Melally paid the bill for all the officers on 12 December 1776. Although the charges were allowed at first, they were later disallowed. He also supervised the cleaning (graving) of the ship during this time. [NDAR, 7, 459] Among his minor duties was purchasing a dozen brooms for the ship. [NDAR, 6, 278-279] Melally was obstinate, saying that "he n his bisness & he Did not want aney body to tell him aney thing nor to interfeare with his bisness nither wood he interfeare with aney bodyes Else bisness." In the opinion of Captain of Marines Eliphalet Roberts, Melally didn't know how to handle a big square rigged ship like the Oliver Cromwell. [NDAR, 7, 1277-1279 and 1279 note] Melally was discharged by the Council of Safety on 14 March 1777. [NDAR, 8, 310-311 and 311 note] This news was brought from Lebanon by Marine Captain Eliphalet Roberts and produced "a Vast Confusion on Board...Party will be party," reported Coit. [NDAR, 8, 133-134 and 134 note] Midshipman LUTHER ELDERKIN, on 17 March, reported "Uneasiness" among the officers over Melally's dismissal. Master LEVI YOUNG, the boatswain, and several other officers would "decline the service, unless the Ship shall be officer'd agreeable to their Minds." [NDAR, 8, 134-135] Elderkin noted that Melally had always behaved as an experienced officer should. [NDAR, 8, 184-185]


MELVILL, THOMAS

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

10/[1]/76

MA

Schooner Active (6/65)

Andrew Gardner

Nehemiah Somes, Joseph Pierce, Eleazer Johnson, Thomas Melvill, John Hinkley

Andrew Gardner, Joseph Pierce, Nehemiah Somes

[NDAR, VI, 1213 and note]


MERCIER, WILLIAM

NY

[Member, New York Marine Committee]


William Mercier was a member of the New York Provincial Congress in June 1776, and presumably a member of the Marine Committee of that body. [NDAR, 5, 359] When New York Navy Sloop Montgomery (Captain WILLIAM ROGERS) captured four prizes off Fire Island Inlet on 27 June 1776, Mercier was sent by the Marine Committee to take charge of the prizes and cargoes. [NDAR, 5, 789-790]


MERIWETHER, JAMES

VA

Second Lieutenant, Virginia Marines


James Meriwether was appointed, on 5 November 1776, as Second Lieutenant of Marines in Captain of Marines THOMAS MERIWETHER’s company. [Stewart, 224-225] According to NOAR, 207, this was on 28 November] Meriwether was aboard the Virginia Navy Brig Northampton. On 19 February 1777  Meriwether was a second lieutenant in the “land service.” He was a lieutenant in Captain John Rogers’ company of cavalry until 1 June 1781, after which he was in the Continental service. [Stewart, Virginia’s Navy, 224-225]


MERIWETHER, THOMAS

VA

Captain of Marines, Virginia Marines


Thomas Meriwether was commissioned on 29 March 1776 as First Lieutenant [of Marines] on the Virginia Navy Brig Liberty (Captain THOMAS LILLY). [NOAR, 27] On 7 October Meriwether presented a complaint to the Virginia Navy Board against Lieutenant GEORGE ROGERS stating “That the language of Lt. George Rogers to the Marines is Most Scurrilous Abusive & Profane; That he had at different times struck them Particularly John Reynolds with a peice of Iron when unwell and excused from Duty by the commanding officer.” Rogers was found guilty as charged and ordered to apologize to Meriwether. [Stewart, Virginia’s Navy, 34] He was promoted to Captain of Marines on 28 November 1776. [NOAR, 207. But see Stewart, 224-225, where hi is a Captain of Marines on 5 November 1776.] After the war he moved to Jefferson County, Georgia. He may have been alive in 1851. [Stewart, 225]


MESNARD, THOMAS

[See MISNARD, THOMAS]


MESSONNIER, JOHN HENRY

PA

Owner, Pennsylvania Privateers


John Henry Messonnier was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was associated in privateering with JOHN C. ZOLLICKHOFFER. Vessels associated with Messonnier were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

12/26/81

PA

Ship Two Esthers (10/35)

James Byrne

J. H. Messonnier, John C. Zollickhoffer

James Byrne, John Henry Messonnier

James Trimble [NRAR, 480]


MIDDLETON, JOHN

SC

Commander, South Carolina Privateers


John Middleton was in command of the South Carolina Privateer Sloop Little Charles in 1777. [Coker, 300]


MIFFLIN, SAMUEL

PA

Commodore designate, Pennsylvania Navy


Offered command 2 September 1776, declined 20 September 1776 [Jackson, 334]


MILLER, CHARLES

[CT]

Owner, Connecticut Privateers


Charles Miller was listed, by the British, as the owner of the privateer Nancy. Itís not clear if Miller was part of the PERKINS-HUNTINGTON combination that was the previous owner of the Nancy.

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

[6/15/77]

CT

Sloop Nancy (4/)

Robert Palmer

 

[see Nancy]


MILLER, CHRISTOPHER

NY

Captain, Continental Navy


Christopher Miller of New York was recommended by the Marine Commitee as captain of one of the two new frigates in New York on 6 June 1776. [NDAR, V, 397-398] On 12 June, what was to be Miller's vessel became the Continental Navy Ship Congress when the Marine Committee assigned the names to the frigates. [NDAR, V, 497] Miller was to be the senior of the two New York captains, [NDAR, V, 549, 568] but never took up his appointment. On 22 August 1776 he was replaced on the Congress by Captain THOMAS GRENNELL. [NDAR, VI, 270-271, 274]


MILLER, NATHAN

RI

Owner, Rhode Island Privateers


Nathan Miller was born in Warren, Rhode Island on 20 March 1743. Miller attended a private school and became a merchant and shipbuilder. He served as a delegate to the general assembly from 1772-1774, in 1780, from 1782-1783, and in 1790. He served in the militia and was Brigadier General of the Rhode Island Militia for Newport and Bristol Counties from 1772-1778, He was a deputy in the Rhode Island State Assembly for six years and a Member of the Continental Congress, in 1786. Miller was a member of the state constitutional convention in 1790 and died in Warren on 20 May 1790. Nathan Miller was listed as the owner of the following Rhode Island privateers:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

10/2/79

RI

Sloop Abigail

John Hall

Nathan Miller

 

[Sheffield, 61]


MILLER, PETER

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


Peter Miller was born about 1757 and was a resident of Philadelphia in 1781. [NOAR, 208] On 8 March 1781 he was commissioned to command the Pennsylvania Privateer Brig Ariel, [NRAR, 230] listing his age as 25. He was recommissioned to the Ariel on 8 May 1781. [NOAR, 208]


MILLER, WILLIAM

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


William Miller was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [NRAR, 220] He was born about 1761. [NOAR, 208] He was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Brigantine Adriana on 9 October 1780. [NRAR, 220] On 24 October 1781 he was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Brigantine Rebecca. [NRAR, 434] He listed his age as 20 in 1781. [NOAR, 208]


MILLIGAN, JACOB

SC

Captain, Georgia Navy

[Captain], South Carolina Navy

Commander, South Carolina Privateers


Jacob Milligan was a resident of Charleston, South Carolina in 1775. He was a merchant skipper, commanding the Hetty. On 5 December 1775 Hetty was inbound to Charleston from Jamaica with a cargo of rum, when she was captured by HM Sloop Scorpion (Commander John Tollemache). The British detained Milligan aboard the Scorpion and began fitting out Hetty as a tender. [NDAR, II, 1300-1301, 1314; III, 14-15] Milligan kept his eyes open aboard the British ship. As soon as he was released he reported, on 7 December, to the South Carolina Council of Safety. [NDAR, II, 1329-1331; III, 29-30] On 16 December 1775, when he was commissioned as a Third Lieutenant in the South Carolina Navy, and assigned to the South Carolina Navy Ship Prosper (Captain William Henry Drayton. [NDAR, III, 133-136] At the time of the British Charleston Expedition the vessel was stripped of her guns, and the General Assembly ordered her sold on 21 September 1776. [NDAR, VI, 941-943] Milligan served in some capacity during the Sullivan’s Island battle, perhaps on the Comet. [xx] Out of work now, Milligan turned to privateering. Milligan was commissioned to the South Carolina Privateer Sloop Rutledge on 3 December 1776. [NDAR, VII, 467-468; Coker, 89, 300] She soon sailed for the West Indies. On 4 March 1777 she captured the slave brig Endeavour and took her to Martinique. On 2 April brig Diana was captured. On 30 April Milligan fell in with two Antigua privateers and captured one, the Royal George. Brig Nancy was taken on 3 May and Milligan and Rutledge returned to Charleston on 18 May. [see Rutledge] Another cruise took place in the summer of 1777. Following this cruise Milligan left the Rutledge. [Coker, 90, 300] He commanded the Georgia Navy Galley Lee in March 1779, during the action off Yamasee Bluff, in which the vessel was lost. [xx] In May 1782 Milligan was apparently a Captain in the South Carolina Navy. He commanded an armed schooner which was fitted out at Georgetown, South Carolina, with the South Carolina Navy Galley Revenge. [Coker, 114, 123]


MISNARD [MESNARD], THOMAS

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


Thomas Misnard [NRAR, 218] (or Mesnard) [NRAR, 447] was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, [NRAR, 218] and was born about 1750. [NOAR, 209] He was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Brig Active on 8 November 1779. [NRAR, 218] Active was captured on 25 May 1780 by HM Frigate Iris (Captain James Hawker) and sent into New York. [see Active] On 7 May 1781 he was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Ship Morris, [NRAR, 398] listing his age as 31. [NOAR, 209] Misnard was appointed to the Pennsylvania Privateer Ship Rose on 3 August 1782. [NRAR, 447]


MITCHELL, FRANCIS

CT

Prize Master, Connecticut Privateers


Francis Mitchell was aboard the Connecticut Privateer Brigantine Hancock (Commander JOSEPH CONKLING) as a Prize Master in April 1783. When the brigantine Lyon was captured on 2 April 1783, Mitchell was sent aboard with six men to take her into New London, Connecticut. [Middlebrook, II, 108]


MITCHELL, HENRY

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Henry Mitchell was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was associated in privateering with FRANCIS JOHONNOT, GEORGE STEWART JOHONNOT, WILLIAM ERSKINE, ELISHA SIGOURNEY, GEORGE LITTLE and EDMUND DUNKIN. Vessels associated with Mitchell were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

3/23/79

MA

Ship Cadwallader (14/60)

Henry Johnson

Henry Mitchell et al

Henry Johnson, Francis Johonnot, George Stewart Johonnot

Mary Johonnot, Jonathan Pollard [Allen, MPR, 90]

2/6/79

MA

Sloop Abigail (6/12)

Daniel Smith

Henry Mitchell, Edmund Dunkin

Daniel Smith, Henry Mitchell, Edmund Dunkin

[Allen, MPR, 65]

9/19/80

MA

Brigantine Adventure (14/70)

James Morris

Henry Mitchell

James Morris, Elisha Sigourney, George Little

[NRAR, 221]

As security:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

11/2/79

MA

Ship Batchelor (16/120)

Alexander Holmes

William Erskine et al

Alexander Holmes, Martin Brimmer, Samuel Nicholson

[Allen, MPR, 78]


MITCHELL, WILLIAM

VA

Captain of Marines, Virginia Marines


William Mitchell was a native of Yorktown. He was recruiting as early as 11 January 1776, according to Stewart, though this seems hardly possible. [Potomac?] He was a Captain of Marines. On 1 May 1776 the Virginia Committee of Safety ordered Captain William Mitchell paid £100 on account for purchasing arms and recruiting Marines. [NDAR, IV, 1370-1371] In the ledger book a “Captain Williams” received £60 to recruit Marines and buy arms on 1 May. [NDAR, IV, 1428-1429] Mitchell was commissioned as Captain of Marines on 10 June 1776, aboard the brig Liberty. [NOAR, 209] On 20 August 1776 one John H. Norton was paid £43.17.6 for rum for his Marine company. [NOAR, 209] Mitchell resigned on 5 November 1776. [Stewart, 226. NOAR, 209 makes it 25 November 1776.] He was a captain in the state troops for three years and was a quartermaster at Yorktown. [Stewart, 226]


MIX, JOHN, JR.

CT

Owner, Connecticut Privateers


John Mix, Jr. of New Haven, Connecticut, was associated with Phineas Bradley & Co. Associated with Mix in privateering were ABEL BUELL, PHINEAS BRADLEY, and SAMUEL BIRD, JR. Vessels associated with Mix were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

6/1/82

CT

Sloop Tiger (2/35)

Daniel Jones

Phineas Bradley & Co.

Daniel Jones, Phineas Bradley, Abel Buell, John Mix, Jr., Samuel Bird, Jr.

[NRAR, 476]


MIX, JONATHAN

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


MONTGOMERY, HUGH

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


MOORE, D.

[Prize Master, Massachusetts Privateers]


In the index to NDAR, X, 1348, “D. Moore” is listed as the master of the prize brigantine William and Mary, taken by the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Oliver Cromwell (Commander WILLIAM COLES). As her master was known to the British as Platt [NDAR, IX, 623 and note], Moore was probably the prize master.


MOORE, NATHAN

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Connecticut Privateer Sloop Betsey (Commander Nathan Moore) was at sea off Narragansett Bay in September 1778. She was conducting salvage operations on several British vessels which had foundered in Rhode Island that month. While doing so the sloop Seaflower (Isaac Robinson) was encountered and captured. The sloop and the salvaged goods were brought into New London, Connecticut and were tried on 5 October 1778. [Middlebrook, Maritime Connecticut During The Revolution, II, 60]


MOORE, PHILIP

PA

Owner, Pennsylvania Privateers


Philip Moore was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Boston, Massachusetts, and a principal figure in Moore & Co., a commercial firm heavily into privateering. Vessels associated with Moore and/or Moore & Co. were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

4/11/76

PA

Sloop Chance (4/45)

John Adams

Joseph Dean, Philip Moore & Co.

Joseph Dean, Philip Moore & Co.

[NDAR, IV, 775, 775]

4/11/76

PA

Sloop Congress (6/45)

George McAroy

Joseph Dean, Philip Moore & Co.

Joseph Dean, Philip Moore & Co.

[NDAR, IV, 775, 775]

10/28/76

MA

Ship General Mifflin (26/120)

William Day

Philip Moore & Co., John R. Livingston, Archibald Mercer

William Day, Philip Moore, Archibald Mercer

[Allen, MPR, 148]

10/18/76

MA

Brigantine Rising States (8/100)

James Thompson

William Davis, Philip Moore, Cairns [Carnes], Mercer and Thompson

James Thompson, William Davis, Samuel Allyne Otis

[Allen, MPR, 263]

11/29/76

MA

Brig Hancock (12/60)

Daniel McNeill

Archibald Mercer, Philip Moore

Daniel McNeill, Archibald Mercer, Philip Moore

[Allen, MPR, 162]

12/6/76

NH

Ship Portsmouth (20/100)

Robert Parker

John Langdon (Moore & Co.) et al

Robert Parker, John Langdon, Joshua Brackett

[NRAR, 420]

5/5/77

MA

Schooner Freedom (10/70)

James Colven

Philip Moore, Archibald Blair

James Colven, Philip Moore, Archibald Blair

[Allen, MPR, 138]

6/7/77

NH

Ship Portsmouth (20/100)

John Hart

John Langdon (Moore & Co.) et al

John Hart, John Langdon, George Wentworth

[NRAR, 420]

12/22/77

MA

Schooner General Lincoln (10/50)

John Margeson

Philip Moore

John Margeson, Philip Moore, Samuel White

[Allen, MPR, 147]

12/22/77

MA

Schooner George (8/20)

John Moulton

Philip Moore

John Moulton, Philip Moore, Samuel White

[Allen, MPR, 155-156]

2/4/78

MA

Sloop Loyal American (10/45)

William Grinnell

Philip Moore

William Grinnell, Philip Moore, Briggs Hallowell

[Allen, MPR, 212]

3/18/78

MA

Ship General Mifflin (20/150)

Daniel McNeill

Philip Moore et al

Daniel McNeill, Philip Moore, James Craig

[Allen, MPR, 148-149]

3/18/78

MA

Sloop Retaliation (10/50)

John Carey

Philip Moore et al

John Carey, Philip Moore, John Lockwood

[Allen, MPR, 259]

10/9/78

MA

Sloop Royal Louis (10/35)

John Moulton

Philip Moore et al

John Moulton, Philip Moore

[Allen, MPR, 269]

9/20/79

PA

Sloop Active (14/60)

Peter Day

Philip Moore and James Ash & Co.

Peter Day, Philip Moore, James Ash

[NRAR, 218]

4/7/80

PA

Brig George (8/20)

James Montgomery

Philip Moore & Co.

James Montgomery, Philip Moore

[NRAR, 316]

7/17/80

PA

Boat Revenge (1/25)

Aaron Swaine

Philip Moore & Co.

John Patton, Benjamin Davis, Jr.

[NRAR, 440]

8/7/80

PA

Schooner Friendship (/20)

John Badcock

Philip Moore and James Craig & Co.

Philip Moore, James Craig, Jr.

[NRAR, 305]

2/23/81

PA

Brig Schuylkill (10/35)

John Souder

James Craig and Philip Moore & Co.

John Souder, James Craig, Jr.

[NRAR, 455]

5/25/81

PA

Brig George (10/50)

William Campbell

Philip Moore, James Craig & Co.

William Campbell, James Craig

[NRAR, 316]

9/20/81

PA

Brigantine Schuylkill (8/35)

John Burrows

James Craig, Philip Moore, John Patton et al

John Burrows, James Craig, Jr.

[NRAR, 456]

2/27/82

PA

Brig George (6/16)

Robert French

James Craig, Jr., Philip Moore et al

James Craig, Jr., Philip Moore

[NRAR, 316]

3/13/82

PA

Brigantine Burd (6/20)

William Campbell

Philip Moore and John Redman & Co.

William Campbell, John Redmond

[NRAR, 244]

4/5/82

PA

Schooner Salmon (4/16)

Philipps Kollock

Philip Moore, John Redmond & Co.

Philipps Kollock, John Redmond

[NRAR, 453]

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

1/12/79

MA

Sloop Betsey (4/10)

Elisha Smith

Isaac Sears et al

Elisha Smith, Philip Moore, Paschal N. Smith

[Allen, MPR, 80]

3/31/79

MA

Ship Mifflin (20/130)

George Waith Babcock

Mungo Mackay et al

George Waith Babcock, Mungo Mackay, Philip Moore

[Allen, MPR, 220]


MOORE, PHILIP

GA

Merchant Contractor


Philip Moore was a merchant who agreed to lade his vessel for a public trading voyage on 9 August 1776.


MOORE, JOSHUA

MA

Commander, New Hampshire Privateers


Joshua Moore was a resident of Kittery, Massachusetts (Maine) when he was commissioned to the New Hampshire Privateer Schooner McClary. Moore was in command by 10 November 1776, with McClary expected to soon sail. [NDAR, VII, 101] McClary sailed from Portsmouth about 20 November 1776. [NDAR, VII, 271-272] Moore took her far out into the Atlantic. On 15 December 1776 he fell in with Rhode Island Privateer Sloop Charming Sally. The two exchanged greetings then sailed together for a short while. At 1500, about 34°12'N, 42°W, a sail was sighted and chased. McClary caught up with her first and took possession. About 1900, when Charming Sally's boat came up to the prize, the New Hampshire men refused to let the Rhode Islanders aboard, or claim any part of the prize. The prize was the snow Resolution (Francis Bernard or Burnett), from Newfoundland to the West Indies with a cargo of fish. Resolution was ordered to Portsmouth. But she never got in, sinking three days later. The prize crew and prisoners took to the long boat, and were picked up a week later by a vessel bound from America to Martinique. [NDAR, VIII, 527-528 and 528 note] McClary returned to port about 17 February 1777, having taken one transport brigantine. [NDAR, VII, 1226 and note] This was probably the British Transport Brigantine Favourite (Christopher Yeoman), about 260 tons, bound to England from New York. [NDAR, VII, 1273-1274] Moore now apparently departed his command. [NRAR, 381] Moore was commissioned to the New Hampshire Privateer Schooner Rambler on 21 May 1779. [NOAR, 211]


MORGAN, ABEL

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


MORGAN, CHARLES

SC

Captain, South Carolina Navy

Commander, South Carolina Privateers


Charles Morgan was in command of the South Carolina Privateer Sloop Swift in 1776. He was in command of the South Carolina Privateer Brig Active in 1776. [Coker, 300] Morgan was in command of the South Carolina Privateer Brigantine Fair American by June 1777. He was a native of Bermuda. [ NDAR, IX, 152] Morgan’s brother Francis [NDAR, X, 950-952 and 952 note] commanded the South Carolina Privateer Brig Experiment and they sailed together often. Charles Morgan was not too careful in recruiting his crew, taking some of the crew of Continental Navy Ship Randolph (Captain Nicholas Biddle) aboard. [NDAR, IX, 863-864] On 11 June 1777 the Morgans conducted a raid on the western end of the island of Bermuda. [NDAR, IX, 192-195] The two brigs just missed capturing HM Frigate Galatea's tender (the ex-Peggy of Charleston) and the "Decoy-Boat." The British prepared to burn the boat to prevent its capture. Unfortunately, the two American brigs could not get a pilot and the two British vessels escaped in the night and got around to Castle Harbor (where HM Sloop Nautilus lay, refitting). On 13 June the two brigs entered Western Harbor and were taken under fire from the five gun fort. The Morgans returned a broadside and the militia abandoned the fort. A landing party spiked the guns, demolished the embrasures, dumped one gun in the sea and took four to eight privately owned cannon away. [NDAR, IX, 152, 192-195] On 17 June they captured the sloop Chester, Dutch owned, thereby creating a long-running prize case, although the capture was eventually upheld. [NDAR, X, 950-952 and 952 note] On 17 June the Morgans sailed for St. Eustatius, Dutch West Indies, and arrived there on either 5 or 6 July 1777. The prisoners were released and Fair American sailed on 18 July. [NDAR, X, 950-952 and 952 note] After leaving St. Eustatius the Fair American stumbled across a British Jamaica convoy of eighty sail, bound for England, escorted by HM Frigate Boreas and HM Sloop Hornet. Morgan cut out the schooners Margery and Betsey. Boreas chased Fair American but Morgan eluded her and returned to Charleston with Margery. Betsey grounded off Stono Inlet and went to pieces, with part of the cargo saved. [Coker, Charleston's Maritime Heritage, 93] When Fair American returned to Charleston in late August 1777, Nicholas Biddle was waiting for her. He was determined to recover his deserters. He had “certain intelligence” of Morgan having “four of my Men on Board  I sent my Barge to Board him but he would not bring to  I was Determined to Sink him if he did not and fired at him.” Morgan hove to and Biddle removed two of the deserters; “Two others he had put in a Prize.” Five other men were sent to the South Carolina authorities to testify that Morgan had knowingly signed Continental Navy deserters. [NDAR, “Captain Nicholas Biddle to Robert Morris,” IX, 863-864] Morgan’s brig, the Fair American, was taken into the South Carolina Navy on 20 December 1777, along with Morgan, for the Randolph expedition. [NDAR, X, 768] Two days later Morgan was ordered to draw supplies from the naval commissary, open a house of rendezvous, and complete his wood and water. [NDAR, X, 750 and note]


MORGAN, FRANCIS

SC

Commander, South Carolina Privateers


Francis Morgan was in command of the South Carolina Privateer Sloop Swift in 1776.  He later was in command of the South Carolina Privateer Brig Experiment. [Coker, 300]


MORONY [MARONY], WILLIAM

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


William Morony [Marony] of Boston, Massachusetts [Allen, MPR, 88] was commissioned to Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Buckram on 24 April 1777. [ NDAR, VIII, 417-418; Allen, MPR, 88, the date is given as 25 April 1777] She was among those who sailed with Manley's Continental frigates on 21 May 1777. [NDAR, VIII, 1006-1007] When a storm broke up Manley’s squadron Buckram was one of two privateers severely disabled and was forced to return to Boston. [NDAR, IX, 16; 93-94] She was back in port by 4 June 1777 when her owners petitioned for a commission for another commander who was more “agreeable to the Men than Capt Marony.” [NDAR,  IX, 16]


MORRELL, JOHN

PA

Owner, Pennsylvania Privateers


John Morrell was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was associated with the following vessels:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

12/3/81

PA

Schooner Seaflower (6/12)

William Breden

John Hood, John Morrell, John Campbell, Charles Push [Rush}

William Breden, John Morrell

James Trimble, Frederick Snider [NRAR, 457]

As security:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

8/18/79

PA

Schooner Terrible (4/14)

Joshua Baker

Henry Thorne and Joshua Baker & Co.

Henry Thorne, John Morrell

James Trimble [NRAR, 473]


MORRIS, F.

[see MORRIS, JAMES]


MORRIS, JAMES

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


James Morris, a resident of Boston, Massachusetts, was appointed to command the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Adventure on 19 September 1780. [NRAR, 221]


MORRIS, SAMUEL C.

Owner, Pennsylvania Privateers


Samuel C. Morris was a member of a firm of merchants at Philadelphia, not apparently related to Robert Morris. He was associated with the following privateers:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

4/22/79

PA

Brigantine Achilles (10/)

Thomas Murdock

Thomas Morris

Cadwallader Morris,

Samuel C. Morris

James Trimble [NRAR, 217]

8/28/79

PA

Brigantine Achilles (12/30)

George Thomason [Thomson]

Thomas Morris,

John Wilcocks

Samuel C. Morris

James Trimble [NRAR, 217]

2/2/81

PA

Schooner Nansemond (6/14)

Jacob De Hart

Stewart & Totten

Samuel C. Morris, Alexander Stewart

Jacob De Hart, James Trimble [NRAR, 401]

3/24/81

PA

Brigantine Don Francisco (8/25)

John Gifford

Stewart & Totten

Alexander Stewart, Thomas Morris

Aaron Stockholm, James Trimble [NRAR, 275]

3/24/81

PA

Schooner Havanna (6/15)

Aaron Stockholm

Stewart & Totten

Alexander Stewart, Thomas Morris

Aaron Stockholm, James Trimble [NRAR, 328]

3/18/82

PA

Schooner Nimrod (6/18)

Stewart Dean

Thomas Morris,

Cadwallader Morris

Stewart Dean,

Thomas Morris

James Trimble [NRAR, 406]


MORRIS, THOMAS

Continental Agent, Continental Navy [France]


Thomas Morris was the younger brother of Robert Morris. He was in France, or being sent there, on 3 October 1776, when the Committee of Secret Correspondence directed William Hodge to consult with Morris and Silas Deane on Continental business matters. [NRAR, 19-20] Another letter of the same date directs Hodge to take dispatches to Morris and Deane. [NRAR, 20] A letter of 4 October 1776 from the Marine Committee to Continental Agent William Bingham at Martinique encloses a list of stores desired for the Continental Navy. Hodge was to forward the list to Morris if he could not obtain them. [NRAR, 20] Morris and Jonathan Williams conducted the sale of prize brig Mary. Account was dated 2 February 1778. [NRAR, 66]


MORRIS, THOMAS

Owner, Pennsylvania Privateers


Thomas Morris was a merchant and a member of a firm at Philadelphia. They were not, apparently, related to Robert Morris. He is not to be confused with the above Thomas Morris.

Thomas Morris was associated with the following privateers:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

4/22/79

PA

Brigantine Achilles (10/)

Thomas Murdock

Samuel C. Morris & Co.

Cadwallader Morris,

Samuel C. Morris

James Trimble [NRAR, 217]

8/28/79

PA

Brigantine Achilles (12/30)

George Thomason [Thomson]

Samuel Morris,

John Wilcocks

Samuel C. Morris

James Trimble [NRAR, 217]

3/18/82

PA

Schooner Nimrod (6/18)

Stewart Dean

Samuel C. Morris,

Cadwallader Morris

Stewart Dean,

Thomas Morris

James Trimble [NRAR, 406]

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

3/24/81

PA

Brigantine Don Francisco (8/25)

John Gifford

Stewart & Totten, Samuel C. Morris & Co

Alexander Stewart, Thomas Morris

Aaron Stockholm, James Trimble [NRAR, 275]

3/24/81

PA

Schooner Havanna (6/15)

Aaron Stockholm

Stewart & Totten, Samuel C. Morris & Co

Alexander Stewart, Thomas Morris

Aaron Stockholm, James Trimble [NRAR, 328]


MORRIS, WILLIAM

(P)

Captain, Continental Marines


Listed as both a Captain [512] and a Lieutenant of Marines [514] in Paullin.


MORTON, EDWARD

VA

First Lieutenant, Virginia Navy


Edward Morton was a [First] Lieutenant in 1777, replacing JEFFRIES on the schooner Revenge [galley Norfolk Revenge?]. [Stewart, 229] On 28 May 1778 the Norfolk Revenge (Captain WRIGHT WESTCOTT) was sunk in Nansemond River with a loss of prisoners, including Morton. [Stewart, 53] Morton died in captivity in 1779. He was married and his wife was provided with pay, clothing and other assistance during his captivity. [Stewart, 53, 229]


MORTON, ENOCH

MA

[Owner], Massachusetts Privateers


Enoch Morton was a resident of Cape Ann, Massachusetts. He was associated with the following privateers:

As security:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

1/5/79

MA

Brigantine Adventure (6/15)

John O'Brien

Caleb Tapping

John O'Brien, Daniel Tappan, Enoch Morton

[Allen, MPR, 67]


MORTON, PEZEZ

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

7/10/77

MA

Brigantine Zanga (16/110)

Arthur Crawford

Perez Morton et al

Perez Morton, Benjamin Hichborn

[Allen, MPR, 330]

3/27/80

MA

Brigantine Amazon (8/50)

Noah Stoddard

Thomas Tillotson, Perez Morton

Noah Stoddard, Thomas Tillotson, Perez Morton

[Allen, MPR, 70]

7/5/82

MA

Schooner Fair Trader (4/14)

Peter Geyer

Peter Geyer, Perez Morton, James Sullivan

Peter Geyer, Perez Morton, James Sullivan

David L. Barnes, Samuel Quincy, Jr. [NRAR, 288; Allen, MPR, 125]


MOSES, BENJAMIN

MA

Second Lieutenant, Massachusetts Navy

Second Lieutenant, Massachusetts Privateers


Benjamin Moses was a resident of Salem, Massachusetts. He was appointed as a Master in the Massachusetts Navy, assigned to the Massachusetts Navy Brig Tyrannicide (Captain JOHN FISKE) on 26 October 1776. He was promoted to Second Lieutenant and was aboard the Tyrannicide under Captain JONATHAN HARADEN on 10 March 1777. Moses was appointed as Second Lieutenant aboard the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Pilgrim (Commander HUGH HILL) on 12 September 1778. [Howe, Beverly Privateers, 431]


MOULTON, JOSEPH, Jr.

MA

[Owner], Massachusetts Privateers


Joseph Moulton, Jr. was a resident of Newburyport, Massachusetts. He was associated in privateering with RALPH CROSS, Ralph Cross, Jr. and MOSES LITTLE. Vessels associated with Moulton were:

As security:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Security

Witness

8/7/79

MA

Ship Behmus (8/20)

Samuel Bayley

Ralph Cross et al

Samuel Bayley, Moses Little, Joseph Moulton, Jr.

[Allen, MPR, 79]


MUGFORD, JAMES

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


James Mugford was a resident of Marblehead, Massachusetts. He was associated in privateering with JOSEPH CUNNINGHAM and, possibly, SAMUEL WHITE of Boston, Massachusetts and JOHN GRUSH of Marblehead. Vessels associated with Mugford were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Security

Witness

4/29/77

MA

Brig Bellona (14/90)

Thomas Stephens

James Mugford et al

Thomas Stevens, James Mugford, Joseph Cunningham.

[Allen, MPR, 314]


MUIR, JOHN

MD

Owner, Maryland Privateers


John Muir was a resident of Annapolis, Maryland. He was associated with the following privateers:

As security:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

7/6/81

MD

Brig Otho (12/35)

John Martin

Samuel Smith, Wallace Johnson, John Muir

John Martin, John Muir

[Arch. MD. 45:495; NRAR, 408]


MUIRSON, HEATHCOTE

NY

First Lieutenant of Marines, Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron


Heathcote Muirson (or Heathcoat Murison or Morrison) [Claghorn, 216] was the son of a Dr. George Muirson of Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. The father was a loyalist and the younger Muirson joined the Continentals against the express wishes of his family. Muirson was probably assigned to the Continental Army Galley Washington in September 1776. He was captured with the galley at the Battle of Split Rock, 13 October 1776. Despite Carleton's releasing most prisoners within a day or two, Muirson was not released on parole until April 1778. [Smith, Marines in the Revolution, 30] He became Captain of Marines aboard the privateer Angelica and was captured by the British. On 7 July 1778 Muirson was committed to Forton Prison near Portsmouth, England. He later escaped. [Claghorn, 216]


MULLIKEN, JONATHAN

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Jonathan Mulliken was a resident of Newburyport, Massachusetts. Mulliken was associated in privateering with JOSEPH STANWOOD, MOSES BROWN, ABNER GREENLEAF, and BARTLETT. Privateers associated with Mulliken:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

1/31/81

MA

Ship Beaver (6/20)

William Russell

Moses Brown, Joseph Stanwood, Jonathan Mulliken, Abner Greenleaf

William Russell, Jonathan Mulliken, Joseph Stanwood

[NRAR, 233]

2/5/81

MA

Ship Beaver (6/20)

William Russell

Moses Brown, Joseph Stanwood, Jonathan Mulliken, Abner Greenleaf

William Russell, Moses Brown, Jonathan Mulliken

[NRAR, 233]

4/2/82

MA

Ship Reprisal (4/14)

Johnson

Moses Brown, Bartlett, Jonathan Mulliken

 

[NRAR, 436]

5/11/82

MA

Brigantine Lark (4/15)

Boardman

Moses, Brown, Abner Greenleaf, Jonathan Mulliken, Pettingell

 

[NRAR, 369]


MULLEN, ROBERT


(P)

Captain, Continental Marines


MUNRO, JAMES

RI

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers

Commander, Rhode Island Privateers


James Munro was a resident of Providence, Rhode Island. He commanded the Rhode Island Privateer Sloop Sally. On 23 July 1776 Munro captured the large ship Blaze Castle. [NDAR, VII, 165-168; 642-647] Munro became her commander when she became the Rhode Island Privateer Ship Blaze Castle. [NOAR, 216] His instructions were issued on 20 November 1776. [NDAR, VII, 218-220] By 26 November she was nearly ready to sail, with the date set as 26 November. [NDAR, VII, 250-251] She was evidently still at Providence when the British invaded Rhode Island in early December 1776. Blaze Castle was re-commissioned under Munro on 7 November 1777. [NDAR, X, 630 and note] On the night of 29/30 November 1777 Blaze Castle successfully ran the British blockade, [NDAR, X, 630 and note, 634 and note, 634 and 635 note] and arrived in New London, Connecticut. She lay there collecting a crew, still being there on 25 December 1777. [NDAR, X, 806] The Blaze Castle was captured by the British in June 1778. Munro was sent to Halifax. [NOAR, 216] He was exchanged and commissioned to the Rhode Island Privateer Sloop Hope, on 2 October 1780. On 14 April 1781 he was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Belisarius [Bellisarius]. Munro captured one prize in the Belisarius. In August 1781 he was captured by a two British frigates and a British privateer. The prisoners were taken into New York. [see Belisarius]


MURDOCK, THOMAS

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


Thomas Murdock was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania when he was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Brigantine Achilles, owned by Thomas and Samuel C. Morris, on 22 April 1779. [NRAR, 217]


MUIR, JOHN

MD

Owner, Maryland Privateers


As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

10/20/77

MD

Schooner Williaminta (4/10)

Thomas Waters

Isaac Van Bibber, Charles Wallace, Daniel Weems, John Muir

Thomas Waters, Isaac Van Bibber

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 493]

8/3/78

MD

Sloop Washington (14/20)

John Burrows

Isaac Van Bibber & Co. [Van Bibber and David Weems; John Muir]

John Burrows, John Muir

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 489]

10/9/78

MD

Sloop Lady Washington (6/12)

Nathaniel Cooper

Isaac and Abraham Van Bibber, John Crockett, John Muir

Nathaniel Cooper, John Muir

William Hyde [NRAR, 367]

6/24/80

MD

Brig Revenge (12/32)

Alexander Murray

John Muir et al

Alexander Murray, John Muir

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 440]

10/19/80

MD

Schooner Lady Lee (4/14)

Robert Dashiell

Joseph Williams, Isaac Harris, John Muir

Robert Dashiell, John Muir

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 367]

7/6/81

MD

Brig Otho (12/35)

John Martin

Samuel Smith, Wallace Johnson, John Muir

John Martin, John Muir

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 408]

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

11/19/76

MD

Brigantine Sturdy Beggar (24/100)

John McKeel

Lux, Bowley & Co.

John McKeel, John Muir

Richard Ridgely [NRAR, 465]

11/9/78

MD

Sloop Irish Gimblet (6/10)

Thomas Steel

John McLean, Thomas Russell

Thomas Steel, John Muir

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 353]

11/17/78

MD

Schooner Montgomery (6/6)

James Belt

Wallace, Davidson, and Johnson

James Belt, John Muir

John Davidson [NRAR, 396]

2/4/79

MD

Sloop Little Sam (10/12)

William Weems, Jr.

Richard Curson, David Weems, Samuel Chew et al

William Weems, Jr., John Muir

William Hyde [NRAR, 375]

5/31/79

MD

Brigantine Lively (12/30)

James Belt

Robert Morris, Alexander Nesbitt, Stephen Steward

James Belt, John Muir

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 376]

4/22/80

MD

Schooner Jeune Fendant (8/12)

Thomas Gibbons

Smith, Matthews & Co.

Thomas Gibbons, John Muir

William Hyde [NRAR, 358]

4/24/80

MD

Sloop Porpoise (10/16)

William Weems

Robert Morris, Stephen Steward

William Weems, John Muir

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 419]

8/5/80

MD

Schooner Rover (10/10)

Thomas Patten

Samuel Smith, Daniel Bowley

Thomas Patten, John Muir

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 448]

8/8/80

MD

Brigantine Duke of Leinster (16/60)

William Taylor

William Neill

William Taylor, John Muir

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 278]

8/25/80

MD

Schooner Necessity (4/8)

Francis Charles Dubreüil

Verdue, Karloguen, Payan & Co.

Francis Charles Dubreüil, John Muir

Thomas Johnson. Jr. [NRAR, 401]

8/28/80

MD

Schooner Rambler (10/25)

James Tate

Daniel Bowley, Samuel Smith

James Tate, John Muir

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 427]

9/9/80

MD

Schooner Young Neptune (16/30)

Gilbert de La Roche

Lacaze and Mallet

Gilbert de La Roche, John Muir

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 495]

9/9/80

MD

Schooner Resource (20/24)

Joseph Audet

John Dumestre

Joseph Audet, John Muir

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 438]

As witness:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

12/25/78

MD

Schooner Dragon (4/10)

Thomas Johnson

Hugh Young et al

Thomas Johnson, John Davidson

John Muir [NRAR, 276]


MURPHY, DANIEL

PA

Captain, Pennsylvania Navy


Daniel Murphy was commissioned as a Captain in the Pennsylvania Navy on 1 February 1777 and assigned to the Pennsylvania Navy Boat Eagle. [Jackson, 342] Eagle was stationed at the alarm post at Lewes, Delaware in August 1777. About 5 August Murphy captured a Tory sloop. While escorting her back to Lewes he was attacked by British boats and tenders, but successfully drove them off. [Jackson, 114] Murphy, in the Eagle, participated in the Delaware River campaign of September-November 1777. His boat was among those which escaped upriver in the morning of 20 November 1777. [xx] He was absent on leave on 29 November 1777 and returned to duty in 1778. [Jackson, 342]


MURPHY, JOHN

RI

Commander, Rhode Island Privateers


John Murphy was commissioned to the Rhode Island Privayteer Sloop Swallow in 1777. Swallow sailed from Acoaxet (Dartmouth), Massachusetts for Cap Francois with a cargo of fish, oil and lumber about late August 1777. On 12 September 1777 Swallow was captured by HM Frigate Aeolus, northeast of Turk's Island. [NDAR, IX, 921 and note] Murphy was sent to England and put in Fortun Prison on 23 January 1778. Exactly six months later, 23 July 1778, he escaped. [NOAR, 216]


MURRAY, ALEXANDER

MD

Commander, Maryland Privateers

Owner, Maryland Privateers


Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

8/18/79

MD

Sloop Bennington (6/15)

Robert Craige

Alexander Murray et al

Robert Craige, Charles Wallace

[NRAR, 234]

6/24/80

MD

Brig Revenge (12/32)

Alexander Murray

John Muir et al

Alexander Murray, John Muir

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 440]


MUTER [MUTTER], GEORGE

VA

Captain, Virginia Navy


George Muter was appointed as a Captain in the Virginia Navy, and assigned to a galley to be built on the James on 14 March 1776. [NOAR, 217] This was the Virginia Navy Galley Hero, and he was appointed on 16 March 1776. [Stewart, 229] Muter commanded the Hero on 1 July 1776. [NOAR, 217] He was commissioned by the Governor on 16 July 1776. [Stewart, 229] He was ordered to Portsmouth on 20 August 1776, and when ready, to cruise to the Virginia Capes and annoy the enemy. [NOAR, 217] On 26 September 1776, one John Hawkins was paid £95 for supplying whiskey to the galley. [NOAR, 217] He was aboard the Hero in March 1777, when important orders were sent to him. [Stewart, 18] Hero was stationed near Hampton in the summer of 1777, when Muter received special orders. [Stewart, 19] In March 1778 he assisted the brig Liberty. [Stewart, 48] He later resigned and entered the army, becoming a Lieutenant Colonel. After the war he moved to Woodford County, Kentucky. He died 11 May 1811. [Stewart, 229]


Revised 23 August 2014 © awiatsea.com