J




JACKSON, DANIEL
NH

Commander, New Hampshire Privateers

Daniel Jackson was a resident of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. [NDAR, III, 950] He was commissioned to the New Hampshire Privateer Schooner Enterprize on 27 January 1776, [NOAR, 163] the first New Hampshire privateer commission of the Revolution. Jackson had left the Enterprize by mid-February 1776. [NDAR, IV, 41] The Daniel Jackson of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania may, or may not, be the same person.


JACKSON, SAMUEL
MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers

Samuel Jackson was a merchant residing in Plymouth, Massachusetts. He was a prominent figure in the resistance there. Jackson was listed as the owner of Massachusetts Privateer Sloop Yankee (Commander CORBAN BARNES), commissioned 17 December 1775. [NDAR, III, 214, 602-603]


JACOBS, JUSTIN
 

Midshipman, Continental Navy


Justin Jacobs enlisted aboard the Continental Navy Ship Columbus (HOYSTEED HACKER) at Providence, Rhode Island, on 7 March 1777, as a Midshipman. [NDAR, "Shipping Articles for the Continental Navy Ship Columbus," 8, 118-120]


JAGGER, WILLIAM
 

[see JIGGER, WILLIAM]


JAGGAR, WILLIAM
 

[see JIGGER, WILLIAM]


JAMES. WILLIAM
MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


William James was a resident of Beverly, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Adventure on 11 May 1780. [Allen, MPR, 68]


JARVIS & RUSSELL
 

[see JARVIS, LEONARD]


JARVIS, LEONARD
MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Leonard Jarvis, as “Jarvis & Russell,” petitioned for a commission for the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Caesar (Commander TIMOTHY PEIRCE) on 26 December 1781. [Allen, MPR, 90]


JENKINS, JOHN

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


John Jenkins was a resident of Newburyport, Massachusetts. Vessels associated with Jenkins were:
As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

3/19/82

MA

Ship Cyrus (12/45)

John O’Brien

Joseph Marquand, John Coffin Jones

John O’Brien, Joseph Marquand, John Jenkins

[NRAR, 261]


JEFFREYS, AARON

 

[See JEFFRIES, AARON]


JEFFRIES [JEFFREYS], AARON

VA

[Captain], Virginia Navy


Aaron Jeffries [Jeffreys] was born in 1750. [NOAR, 165] He was commissioned as First Lieutenant [Stewart, 207] on the Virginia Navy Schooner Revenge (Captain WILLIAM DEANE) [NOAR, 165] on 27 August 1776. [Stewart, 207] On 25 November 1776 he was promoted to Captain and assigned to the Virginia Navy Sloop Liberty. [NOAR, 165] The Liberty was a vessel used in the trading department. [Stewart, 49] Jeffries was unable to recruit any seamen and resigned on 21 May 1777. [Stewart, 207] Jeffries died in 1796. [NOAR, 165]









JENIFER, DANIEL OF ST. THOMAS

MD

Agent, Maryland


A business partner of ROBERT T. HOOE of Alexandria, Virginia. The partnership served as an Agent for the State of Maryland.


JENNISON, WILLIAM

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


JIGGER [JAGGER, JAGGAR], WILLIAM

CT

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


William Jigger was a resident of New London, Connecticut. [Allen, Massachusetts Privateers of the Revolution, 73] William Jagger was appointed First Prize Master on the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Revenge (Commander JOSEPH CONKLING), commissioned 23 October 1776. [NRAR, 439; NDAR, VI, 1004-1005 and 1005 note; VII, 995-997] He was on her the entire time of her first cruise, 22 January 1777-22 May 1777, and for her second cruise, perhaps July-September 1777. Two actions were fought, one resulting in the loss of HM Schooner Tender Admiral Parker, on 23 September. [see Revenge] He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Sloop American Revenue on 13 September 1779. [Allen, Massachusetts Privateers of the Revolution, 73]  In June 1780 Jigger was sailing in company with the Connecticut Privateer Schooner Experiment (Commander Giles Hall) when the British sloop Katy (John Brown) was captured. On 4 July 1780 American Revenue was driven ashore and wrecked on Long Island by HM Frigate Galatea. Her crew was rounded up by the Loyalist militia and sent to New York. Jigger secured his release and made a voyage to the West Indies in another sloop. He was knocked overboard on the outbound voyage, about March 1781 and was lost. The sloop made port under the command of one Palmer. [see American Revenue]


JOHNSON, ELEAZAR

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

10/[1]/76

MA

Schooner Active (6/65)

Andrew Gardner

Nehemiah Somes, Joseph Pierce, Eleazer Johnson, Thomas Melvill, John Hinkley

Andrew Gardner, Joseph Pierce, Nehemiah Somes

[NDAR, VI, 1213 and note]


JOHNSON, HENRY

MA/(P)

Captain, Continental Navy

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Henry Johnson was a native of Boston, Massachusetts, born there about 1745. [NDAR, IX, 669-671] He was commissioned as Commander of the Massachusetts Privateer Sloop Yankee on 23 May 1776, when Johnson and Nathaniel Crafts of Watertown, Massachusetts, and Paul Dudley Sargent made her $5000 bond. She was listed as nine guns and with a crew of sixty men. [NDAR, V, 215] Johnson took her to sea at once, sailing out of Boston  [NDAR, 5, 970-971] to intercept the West India traffic in the Gulf of Florida. [NDAR, 6, 1026 and note] On 22 June 1776 [NDAR, 5, 1110-1111 and 1111 note] Yankee fell in with the 300-ton [NDAR, 5, 970-971] ship Zachariah Bayley (James Hodges). [NDAR, 5, 1026 and note] According to Hodges this was at 29o54'N, 70o30'W. [NDAR, 6, 516-517] Zachariah Bayley was armed and made some resistance before surrendering. [NDAR, 5, 969-970 and 970 note] On 26 June, at 31o00'N, 68o30'W [NDAR, 6, 516] a sail was sighted and\ Yankee gave chase. The chase was the 200-ton British Army Transport Ship Creighton (George Ross), [NDAR, 5, 970-971; 5, 969 and note; 5, 1026 and note] armed with two 4-pounders (but only twelve rounds), a substantial crew, and with four sailors from HMS Experiment aboard as passengers. [NDAR, 6, 516, 554] After a short resistance she was captured. Another Indiaman was sighted, but Johnson decided he could not man another large prize with his depleted crew. [NDAR, 5, 1006] With the crews of the two captured ships aboard the Yankee, and his own crew depleted by the two prize crews, the ratio of prisoners to crew aboard Johnson's sloop was considerably lowered. All told there were fourteen prisoners aboard, and only twenty-five Americans. Only two officers were on the Yankee, Johnson and Surgeon Eliphalet Downer, and only two warrant officers. [NDAR, 6, 516-517] In addition, Johnson allowed the British officers the run of the sloop. [NDAR, 6, 529-531] Scarcely had the prizes parted company than the prisoners began to plot an uprising. On 3 July 1776, at 36o40'N, 65o00'W, the British prisoners moved. Johnson, Hodge and Ross were sitting in the cabin, when Johnson laid down his cutlass. One British captain tackled Johnson from behind while the other snatched up the cutlass. Meanwhile the guard on the quarterdeck went forward, thoughtfully laying his cutlass down as he went. A British sailor rescued it and began yelling for help. One of the British captains ran up the ladder, secured the arms chest, and watched as the crew tumbled on deck from below. When one American sailor grabbed a mop handle and advanced, he was told he would have his head lopped off if he took another step. After a few moments of tense negotiation the Americans surrendered, being promised good treatment and to be landed in America. Thus the British prisoners gained command of the vessel without bloodshed. [NDAR, 6, 516-517, 538-539] The American crew was then secured below decks, some being put in irons. [NDAR, 6, 538-539] On 31 July the Yankee was off Dover, England, where the British sent word to the Admiralty of their arrival. [NDAR, 6, 516-517, 517-518] The American crew was mistreated, contrary to the promise of the British merchant captains. They were confined below decks, in a small hold, with only a two inch square grating for ventilation. The heat and smell were stifling and sickness threatened the men. Only two or three were allowed on deck at a time. There was no relief from the heat on deck. Johnson was subjected to rude insults and threats. When the sloop arrived in the Thames River, numerous people were allowed aboard to look at the crew, as if they were strange zoo specimens from another land. Johnson and Downer were allowed to room in a small cabin. [NDAR, 6, 517-518, 529-531] On 4 August 1776 the crew was removed from the Yankee into the transport ship Justitia, which took them to Dover Castle. [NDAR, 6, 532-533, 538-539] They were then placed on HMS Ardent, and then, on 15 August, ten were ordered to Spithead, to serve aboard or be kept aboard HMS Barfleur. The remainder were ordered to be kept aboard HMS Mars. [NDAR, 6, 546] On 16 August, those of the crew who wished to serve in the Royal Navy were allowed to enlist, but only for service in the East Indies or the Mediterranean. The four officers were to be confined. [NDAR, 6, 546-547, 547] There were not four prisoners for long, however: in the night of 30/31 August Johnson escaped from HMS Mars, probably swimming ashore. [NDAR, 6, 581] By 24 September 1776 he had been at Dunkerque, France, and proceeded on his way from there. [NDAR, 6, 611] Johnson worked his way back to America, arriving at Baltimore on 30 January 1777. [NDAR, 7, 1242-1243] On 5 February 1777 he was commissioned as a Captain in the Continental Navy and assigned to Continental Navy Brig Lexington. [NOAR, 167] On 19 September 1777 Lexington was captured by HM Cutter Alert (Lieutenant John Bazely). Johnson lost his private adventure, some £450, but Bazely promised to restore his clothing and books. [NDAR, IX, 669-671]

Johnson escaped prison again and returned to Boston in July 1778. He resigned his commission in the Continental Navy. On 23 March 1779 he was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Cadwallader. In the bond, Johnson is listed simply as a “mariner.” [Allen, MPR, 90] In the Cadwallader, Johnson, with two other privateers, fought and captured the British privateer ship Revenge. [see Cadwallader] He was commissioned on 8 June 1780, to the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Minerva. [NOAR, 167]


JOHNSON [JOHNSTON], JACOB

SC

Commander, South Carolina Privateers


Jacob Johnson (Johnston) was in command of the South Carolina Privateer Brigantine Chance in 1776. [Coker, 300] He was in command of the South Carolina Privateer Ship General Moultrie, apparently at a later date. [Coker, 300]


JOHNSON [JOHNSTON], JAMES

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers

Commander, New Hampshire Privateers


James Johnson was a resident of Exeter, New Hampshire when he was commissioned to the New Hampshire Privateer Schooner Adventure on 2 December 1776. [NRAR, 221] A James Johnston, residing in Newburyport, Massachusetts, was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Pallas on 21 November 1777. [Allen, MPR, 232] Johnston left the Pallas at some point before 3 April 1780, when he commanded the New Hampshire Privateer Ship Harrison. [NOAR, 168] Harrison was mentioned in the Boston Gazette of 26 June 1780, the skipper’s name being given as James Johnson. [Allen, MPR, 167] Johnston was again commissioned to the Pallas on 11 September 1781. [NRAR, 409]


JOHNSON, JOSEPH

MA

Surgeon’s Mate, Massachusetts Privateers


Joseph Johnson was listed as a surgeon’s mate on the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Pilgrim (Commander JOSEPH ROBINSON) on 14 August 1780.[Howe, Beverly Privateers, 414]


JOHNSON, ROBERT

Master, Continental Navy


Killed in action 7 March 1778, on the Randolph.


JOHNSON [JOHNSTON], SAMUEL

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Samuel Johnson [Johnston] was a resident of Middletown, Connecticut. [Middlebrook, Maritime Connecticut During The Revolution, 71] He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Hazard on 20 October 1779. [NOAR, 168] Johnson was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Brigantine Delight on 26 July 1781. A voyage was made to the West Indies, Delight returning to New London, Connecticut on 4 September 1782 from St. Kitts. Johnson started another cruise, but was captured about October 1782 and taken into New York. [Middlebrook, Maritime Connecticut During The Revolution, 71]


JOHNSON, WALLACE

MD

Owner, Maryland Privateers


Wallace Johnson was a resident of Maryland, possibly Annapolis. He was associated with the following privateers:

As security:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

7/6/81

MD

Brig Otho (12/35)

John Martin

Samuel Smith, Wallace Johnson, John Muir

John Martin, John Muir

[Arch. MD. 45:495; NRAR, 408]


JOHNSTON, JAMES

[See JOHNSON, JAMES]


JOHONNOT, FRANCIS

MA

[Owner], Massachusetts Privateers


Francis Johonnot was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was associated in privateering with GEORGE STEWART JOHONNOT and HENRY MITCHELL. Vessels associated with Johonnot were:

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

3/23/79

MA

Ship Cadwallader (14/60)

Henry Johnson

Henry Mitchell et al

Henry Johnson, Francis Johonnot, George Stewart Johonnot

Mary Johonnot, Jonathan Pollard [Allen, MPR, 90]


JOHONNOT, GEORGE STEWART

MA

[Owner], Massachusetts Privateers


George Stewart Johonnot was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was associated in privateering with FRANCIS JOHONNOT and HENRY MITCHELL. Vessels associated with Johonnot were:

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

3/23/79

MA

Ship Cadwallader (14/60)

Henry Johnson

Henry Mitchell et al

Henry Johnson, Francis Johonnot, George Stewart Johonnot

Mary Johonnot, Jonathan Pollard [Allen, MPR, 90]


JONES [JONS], DANIEL

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Daniel Jones [Jons] was a resident of New Haven, Connecticut. He was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Tiger on 1 June 1782. In December 1782 he captured the sloop Fly. [see Tiger]


JONES, EBENEZER

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Ebenezer Jones was a resident of Stamford, Connecticut. In command of the armed boats Spitfire and Greenwich, and assisted by Commander JEREMIAH HAWLEY, the British schooner Sally was captured on 9 August 1780. In September 1780 Jones captured the sloop Tyron, schooner Anson, sloop Fanny, schooner Fly, and other prizes. [NOAR, 169] He was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Boats Viper, Rattlesnake, and Saratoga on 17 December 1781, one bond covering all three boats. [NRAR, 358, 432, 487] On 30 May 1782 Viper was recommissioned under Commander ISAAC JONES, along with two other boats. [NDAR, 358, 432, 487] Ebenezer Jones apparently retained command of the Rattlesnake and Saratoga. In November and December 1782 he captured two British vessels, as well as the sloop Sally and the sloop Betsey on 5 January 1783. In March 1783 two British sloops and a schooner were captured. [NOAR, 169. However Isaac and Ebenezer may be conflated in this source.]


JONES, GABRIEL

VA

Captain of Marines, Virginia Marines


Gabriel Jones was commissioned as a Captain of Marines on 26 June 1776. [NOAR, 169] According to Stewart, 209, he was a Lieutenant of Marines at some time.


JONES, ISAAC

CT

First Mate, Pennsylvania Navy

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Isaac Jones was a native of Stamford, Connecticut. He was a First Mate in the Pennsylvania Navy, assigned to the Pennsylvania Navy Floating Battery Arnold on 15 March 1776. He was later First Mate on the Pennsylvania Privateer Brigantine Liberty (Commander BRIAMENT). [NOAR, 170] On 30 May 1782 Jones was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Boats Viper, Hawk and Jay, one bond covering all three boats. [NRAR, 358, 432, 487]


JONES, JOHN COFFIN

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


John Coffin Jones was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. Among the prizes taken by one of his privateers (schooner Success, commanded by Philip Trask and John Fletcher, taken 10 December 1778)  was the Spanish ship Holy Martyrs. She was libeled by Jones and Nathaniel Tracy. At trial it was determined that the ship was Spanish but the cargo British. Her master, Joseph de Llano appealed to Congress, where papers were received on 2, 25, 30 and 31 March 1779. [NRAR, 98, 100-101]
Vessels associated with Jones were:
As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

10/12/80

MA

Ship America (20/100)

William Coffin

John Coffin Jones et al

William Coffin, David Cutler, John Coffin Jones

Robert McNeill, Thomas Blanchard [NRAR, 224]

10/30/80

MA

Ship Columbia (12/30)

Jonathan Greely

John Coffin Jones

Jonathan Greely, John Coffin Jones, Thomas Fosdick

Thomas Dipsmore [Dissmore?], Charles Gaboteau [NRAR, 253]

12/25/80

MA

Ship William (12/30)

William Pierce Johnson

John Coffin Jones, William Bartlet, Joseph Marquand

William Pierce Johnson, William Bartlet, Joseph Marquand

Michael Hodge, Joseph Newman [NRAR, 492]

6/1/81

MA

Ship Port Packet (14/50)

George Rapall

Nathaniel and John Tracy, Joseph Marquand and John Coffin Jones

George Rapall, John Tracy, Samuel Newhall

Samuel Cazneau, Moses Brown [NRAR, 420]

7/31/81

MA

Ship Hercules (20/120)

Thomas Dissmore

John Coffin Jones et al

Thomas Dissmore, John Coffin Jones, Tristram Coffin

John Fenno [NRAR, 333]

7/31/81

MA

Schooner Reprisal (4/30)

John Curtis

John Coffin Jones et al

John Curtis, John Coffin Jones, Tristram Coffn

John Fenno [NRAR, 436]

3/19/82

MA

Ship Cyrus (12/45)

John O’Brien

Joseph Marquand, John Coffin Jones

John O’Brien, Joseph Marquand, John Jenkins

Robert Hooper, Michael Hodgr [NRAR, 261]

10/3/82

MA

Brig Dragon (6/20)

John Adams

John Coffin Jones wt al

John Adams, John Coffin Jones, Thomas Lee

Joseph Coffin Boyd, John Fenno [NRAR, 277]

12/21/82

MA

Ship Charming Sally (10/30)

Samuel Dunn, Jr.

John Coffin Jones et al

Samuel Dunn, Jr., John Coffin Jones, John Fenno

John Cutler, John Barrere [NRAR, 252]

1/8/83

MA

Ship Tartar (14/60)

John Cathcart

John Coffin Jones et al

John Cathcart, John Coffin Jones, John Fenno

Green Pearson, Samuel Sumner [NRAR, 473]

As security:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

11/29/80

MA

Brigantine Betsey (4/9)

Peter Wells

Stephen Higginson

Peter Wells, Stephen Higginson, John Coffin Jones

Daniel Sargent, George Burroughs [NRAR, 236]

6/4/81

MA

Schooner Senegal (8/35)

Nathaniel Bently

Samuel Batchelder et al

Nathaniel Bently, Simon Elliot, John Coffin Jones

John Call, Samuel Sumner [NRAR, 458]

8/24/81

MA

Brigantine Spanish Fame (10/25)

James Rob

John Larraqua et al

James Rob, John Coffin Jones, Tristram Coffin

John Fenno [NRAR, 460]

1/4/83

MA

Ship Alexander (17/50)

John Foster Williams

Henry Mitchell et al

John Foster Williams, Henry Mitchell, John Coffin Jones

Samuel Broome, William Shattuck [NRAR, 223]

As witness:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

2/28/82

MA

Brigantine Minerva (16/35)

[John] Allen Hallet

Babcock & Broome

[John] Allen Hallet, Adam Babcock, Samuel Broome

Nathan Spear, John Coffin Jones [NRAR, 394]

8/7/82

MA

Ship St. Mary’s Packet (12/30)

John Leach, Jr.

Samuel Broome et al

John Leach, Jr., Samuel Broome, Adam Babcock

Paul Dudley Sargent, John Coffin Jones [NRAR, 464]

1/6/83

MA

Brig Mentor (10/15)

Samuel Smith

Isaiah Doane et al

Samuel Smith, Samuel Brown, Isaiah Doane

John Coffin Jones, John Henderson [NRAR, 389]


JONES, JOHN PAUL

(P)

Captain, Continental Navy


On 8 August 1787, Jones, in New York, requested the return of his reports on the battle with the Serapis, in a letter to Arthur St. Clair, President of the Continental Congress. [NRAR, 213] On 9 October the committee studying the division of prize money between the Bon Homme Richard and the Alliance brought in it's report, which was accepted on the 11th. [NRAR, 213] On 16 October 1787, Congress unanimously passed a resolution awarding a gold medal to Chevalier John Paul Jones. [NRAR, 214] On the same date Congress passed a resolution to request permission from Louis XIV for Jones to embark on the French fleets of evolution (the training squadrons for higher ranking officers). [NRAR, 213]


JONES, THOMAS

CT

Pilot, Connecticut Navy


Thomas Jones was aboard the Connecticut Navy Ship Oliver Cromwell as Pilot on 25 February 1777, according to the crew list. [NDAR, 7, 1283-1287]


JONES, WILLIAM

(P/A)

Captain, Continental Marines


William Jones was born 8 October 1753, the fourth of five children of William and Elizabeth Jones of Newport, Rhode Island. Jones' father had been a First Lieutenant in the Royal Navy, aboard HMS Duke of Marlborough, and died in 1759. In January 1776 young Jones received a lieutenant's commission in Babcock's (later Lippitt's) Rhode Island State Regiment, and was promoted to captain in September 1776. Young Jones participated in the New York campaign (Battle of Harlem Heights, White Plains, the retreat through New Jersey), and spent the early part of the winter there, with his regiment's enlistment due to expire in December 1776. In response to urgent appeals from Washington, officers and men stayed another month, thus participating in the action at Assunpink and the Battle of Princeton, and becoming an example of Tom Paine's "Winter Soldiers." In February 1777 he returned to Rhode Island. In March 1778, Captain ABRAHAM WHIPPLE (Continental Navy Ship Providence), searching for more experienced officers, recommended Jones for Captain of Marines aboard the Providence. On 9 March 1778, John Deshon, writing to the other members of the Navy Board of the Eastern Department, described Jones as "a man well acquainted with the service, having been in it most of the War, and has great interest in raising a comp of Marines. His appearance and character is such I apprehend as will do honor to the service." [Smith, Marines, 148-149, 306n104, 450] Jones was subsequently appointed as Captain of Marines aboard the Providence. [Smith, Marines, 450] Providence's active service began when she sailed for France on 30 April (or 1 May) 1778 [Smith, 450: 30 April; Smith, 149: night of 1 May] with dispatches for the American Commissioners to France, [Smith, 450] and to obtain cannon and war material. [Smith, 149] The wind was good and the Providence got out of the Providence River briskly. Upon entering Narragansett Bay, HM Frigate Lark was found laying in wait, and a brisk running fight began. Whipple claimed to have disabled the Lark but took damage in his rigging before escaping the bay. On the fourth day out a British battleship was seen, but narrowly evaded. [Smith, Marines, 149] The frigate arrived at Paimboeuf [Smith, Marines, 450] (or Nantes) [Smith, Marines, 149] on 30 May 1778 [Smith, Marines, 149, 450] with a prize, a brig laden with wine. [Smith, Marines, 149] Whipple immediately penned a report (31 May) to the American Commissioners [Smith, Marines, 306n107] and ordered Jones to Paris with the dispatches and instructions to await a reply. [Smith, Marines, 450] Jones was received by the three American Commissioners, who requested that Providence return with a load of clothing and munitions as soon as she was ready tosail. [Smith, Marines, 149] Jones noted later that he was the first American officer to wear the American uniform in Paris (he was so proud of this he put it on his tombstone). The American Commissioners gave him the return dispatches on 11 June 1778. Meanwhile Providence had been careened and repairs begun on her damaged mast and hull. This work had progressed little when Jones returned from Paris, about 15 June. Whipple delegated Jones to oversee the repairs. Jones became increasingly frustrated with the French workmen. In a letter to Whipple (1 July 1778) he commented: "Methinks that if the almighty had been as Long making Such a number of frenchman (As there are) as that they are finishing our mast, he might have had Business for ages yet to Come, and they would have been Somewhat Like other Parts of his workmanship. It would Give me infinite Satisfaction if I could make them understand what I would Say, whereas talking has no Effect. May he who Superintend the universe Deliver us from the hands of those infernal Souls." [Smith, Marines, 149, 306n109] By mid-July the repairs were finally completed and the cargo of copper, cork, arms, ammunition and clothing was beingloaded. [Smith, Marines, 149] On 6 August 1778 [Smith, Marines, 150] Providence sailed from Paimboeuf, crossed the mouth of the Loire, and called at St. Nazaire. Here the Continental Navy Ship Boston (Captain SAMUEL TUCKER) lay. The ships complimented each other with a thirteen gun salute. Two days later the pair sailed for Brest. [Smith, Marines, 150. On p. 450 he states Providence sailed from Paimboeuf on 8 August 1778. This is the interpretation I arrive at.] and arrived at Brest on 14 August. [Smith, Marines, 150, 450] There Continental Navy Ship Ranger lay. [Smith, Marines, 150] The three sailed for home on 22 August [Smith, Marines, 150, 450] and arrived on the Newfoundland Banks on 26 September 1778. [Smith, Marines, 450] The squadron arrived at Portsmouth, New Hampshire on 15 October 1778, [Smith, Marines, 450. On p. 150 he says 16 October.] with three prizes: [Smith, Marines, 150, 450] two brigs and a snow. [Smith, Marines, 150] About 22 October the Boston and Providence sailed for Boston to refit, leaving the Ranger at Portsmouth. [Smith, Marines, 150] In June 1779, Providence, with Continental Navy Ships Queen of France and Ranger cruised to the eastward. In mid-July they met a large Jamaica convoy and, sailing along in company, cut out eleven prizes. Three were recaptured, but the squadron made Boston with eight prizes of considerable value. [Smith, Marines, 450] On 23 November 1779 Providence sailed again, with Continental Navy Ships Boston, Queen of France, and Ranger, headed for Charleston, South Carolina, to provide a naval defense for that port against an impending British attack. Jones was captured when the town fell on 12 May 1780. He was immediately paroled, but never exchanged, and sat out the rest of the war. He engaged in the mercantile hardware business with his brothers in Providence. In 1787 he married and served in turn as a justice of the peace, member of the Rhode Island General Assemby, Speaker of the Assemby, and Governor of Rhode Island (1811-1817). He died 9 April 1822. [Smith, Marines, 450]


JONES, WILLIAM

MD

First Mate [Lieutenant], Maryland Privateers


William Jones was a resident of Baltimore, Maryland in 1776. He was appointed as First Mate (or First Lieutenant) on the Maryland Privateer Sloop Baltimore Hero (Commander THOMAS WATERS) on 16 June 1776. A lengthy voyage to the West Indies followed. [see Baltimore Hero]


JOSIAH, JAMES

PA/(P)

Captain, Continental Navy

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers

Owner, Pennsylvania Privateers


James Josiah was a resident of Philadelphia. [NRAR, 226] He was born about 1752. [NOAR, 171] He was a Captain in the Continental Navy, commissioned 12 October 1776. On 1 August 1778 he was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Sloop Le Gerard. He was recommissioned to the Le Gerard on 24 December 1778. [NRAR, 371] On 21 May 1779 Josiah was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Ship Hetty. [NRAR, 335] On 23-24 August 1779 Josiah was presumably in Philadelphia for the court-martial of Pilot John Emes, who had deserted Continental Navy Xebec Champion when Josiah was Captain of that vessel. [NRAR, 114] On 15 November 1780 he was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Ship Anne. [NRAR, 226] His final privateer was the Pennsylvania Privateer Ship Washington, commissioned 10 August 1782. [NRAR, 490] Josiah listed his age as 30 in 1782. [NOAR, 171] Josiah was entering privateering as an owner by now, associated with the men for whom he had been sailing. Vessels in which he had a partial ownership were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

4/13/82

PA

Brigantine Sally (12/20)

John Fleming

George Henry, James Josiah

John Fleming, [George Henry]

James Trimble [NRAR, 453]

8/10/82

PA

Ship Queen of France (12/45)

Richard Dale

George Henry, James Josiah, John Hunn, John Hood

George Henry, James Josiah

James Trimble [NRAR, 424]

8/10/82

PA

Ship Washington (18/100)

James Josiah

George Henry, James Josiah, Robert Knox

James Josiah, George Henry

James Trimble [NRAR, 490]


Revised 23 August 2014 © awiatsea.com