H




HABERSHAM, JOSEPH
GA

Captain, Georgia Navy (Marine)

As a captain of militia, Joseph Habersham was appointed to joint command of the Georgia Navy Schooner Liberty in July 1775 (along with Captain OLIVER BOWEN). His mission was to capture the ship Philipa and her cargo of powder. The ship was taken on 10 July 1775. In 1776 he was a Captain in the 1st Georgia (Continental) Regiment, a major in 1778, and served until May 1778. [139]


HACKETT, REDMOND
MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers

Redmond Hackett was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Aurora on 1 August 1778. [Allen, MPR, 76]


HATHORNE, DANIEL
MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Daniel Hathorne was a resident of Salem, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner True American (or Free American) on 5 August 1776. [Allen, MPR, 306] In the True American he had a two hour fight with a British packet, losing three killed and nine or ten wounded, including Hathorne. Then took Jenny. She was into Boston by 23 October 1776. Massachusetts Privateer Snow Wasp was at sea in 1776 under a Commander Harthorne (which may be Daniel Hathorne). [Allen, MPR, 324. Following Emmons, 168, which may be incorrect] Massachusetts Privateer Brig Sturdy Beggar is listed as being in service in 1776 under Commander Daniel Hathorne. She was listed as having eight guns and a crew of sixty men. [Allen, MPR, 290] Hathorne was a bonder for the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Pallas (Commander Gamaliel Hodges), commissioned on 15 December 1780. [NRAR, 409]


HACKER, HOYSTEED
RI (P/A)

Captain, Conrinental Navy

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


On 22 August 1776 the Marine Committee ordered Lieutenant Hacker, then in Philadelphia, to report to Commodore Hopkins for further orders. [NRAR, 16] Was given $40 at Warwick Neck by Jones in October 1776. He also received slops from Alfred off Nova Scotia (taken from cargo of Lively). [NDAR, 9, 724] Hoysteed Hacker entered aboard the Continental Navy Ship Columbus (HOYSTEED HACKER) at Providence, Rhode Island, on 5 January 1777. [NDAR, 8, 118-120] In March 1777 Hacker was ordered to get the Columbus ready for sea by Commodore ESEK HOPKINS. [NDAR, 8, 56] On 3 April Hacker served on the court-martial of Third Lieutenant RICHARD MARVIN of the Continental Navy Ship Warren, held aboard Continental Navy Ship Providence, anchored off Fields Point in the Providence River. [NDAR, 8, 263-266] On 16 May 1777 the Marine Committee issued orders to Hacker (then in Philadelphia) to proceed to Providence and take command of Continental Navy Ship Columbus. He was ordered to sail against British transports until 10 July, when he was to open his sealed orders. [NRAR, 46] The Marine Committee (also on on 16 May) forwarded blank warrants for petty officers to Continental Agent Daniel Tillinghast, to be filled out by Hacker and Tillinghast, for the Columbus. [NRAR, 47] Hacker sent out officers to recruit among the coastal towns in July 1777. [NDAR, 9, 289 and note] Hacker was ordered, on 11 September 1777, by the Navy Board of the Eastern Department, to keep his ship in Providence until further notice, but to prepare her for sea at the "Shortest Notice." [NDAR, 9, 908-909] On 16 May 1777 the Marine Committee notified Hacker that he was officially appointed to the Columbus, ordered him to prepare for a four months' cruise, at first off New York against British transports, and then, after 10 July 1777, to follow sealed orders being sent to him. [NDAR, 8, 980]

On 28 June 1780 the Board of Admiralty wrote to Colonel Abraham Skinner, at Elizabeth, New Jersey, requesting an early exchange for "Lt." Hacker and naming two British officers to offer for him. [NRAR, 148] Hacker appointed as senior Lieutenant of the Continental Navy Ship Alliance by the Board of Admiralty on 5 September 1780. [NRAR, 160] Hacker sat on the courts-martial of Captain Pierre Landais and First Lieutenant James Arthur Degge (as a Captain) between 20 November 1780 and 25 January 1781. [NRAR, 170, 171] Hacker was appointed as commander of the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Buccaneer on 30 July 1781, a powerful vessel of eighteen guns and 150 men. Buccaneer was owned by John and Andrew Cabot of Beverly. Hacker stayed on the Buccaneer until about March 1782, when he was replaced by Jesse Fearson. [NRAR, 242]









HADDOCK, ROGER


(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


HALEY [HEALEY, HADLEY, NEALEY], SAMUEL

VA

Second Lieutenant, Virginia Navy


Samuel Haley was a native of Hampton, Elizabeth City County, Virginia. On 17 June 1776 he was appointed as Second Lieutenant of the Virginia Navy Galley Lewis (Captain CELEY SAUNDERS). [NDAR, V, 593-594 and 594 note; listed here as Hadley] He was commissioned on 20 July 1776. [NDAR, V, 1164; listed as Nealey] He served until December 1778. He was promoted by Saunders on 23 April 1777 [to First Lieutenant?]. He was later captain of the Hornet and the Mayflower. He died on 1 September 1799. [Stewart, 194]


HALIS, JOHN

See JOHN HALL


HALL, ELIJAH

(A)

Lieutenant, Continental Navy


HALL, JOHN

RI

Commander, Rhode Island Privateers


John Hall (or Halis) was commissioned to the Rhode Island Privateer Sloop Abigail on 2 October 1779. She made at least one voyage to Saint Domingue in 1780. [See Abigail]


HALLETT, JOSEPH

NY

Member, New York Marine Committee

Prize Agent, New York Navy


Joseph Hallett was a member of the New York Provincial Congress and the New York Marine Committee in June 1776. [NDAR, 5, 789-790] In September 1776 he is described as the agent for prizes. On 18 September he was sent to Connecticut to dispose of the prizes and cargoes taken into that place by New York Navy Sloop Montgomery (Captain WILLIAM ROGERS). [NDAR, 6, 885] He also acted as the Navy agent, providing for Montgomery's refit at New Haven and incurring considerable debt. [NDAR, 8, 933-934] He was succeeded in Connecticut by JOHN BROOME. On 5 July 1777 he paid Rogers' account for some expenses relating to these captures. [NDAR, 9, 219-220] [see also TOM PIERSON]


HALLOCK, WILLIAM


MD (P/A)

Captain, Continental Navy


On 8 June 1776 Lexington was at Cape May. Hallock notified the Marine Committee the vessel was unsafe and needed repair before proceeding to sea. [NRAR, 12] On 16 August 1776 the Marine Committee ordered Hallock and JOHN PAUL JONES to patrol about the Delaware Capes looking for the French sloop Queen of Hungary, expected daily from Martinique with arms and ammunition. [NRAR, 15] On 18 October 1776 the Marine Committee ordered Hallock to place himself under orders of the Secret Commitee, for a cruise under their direction. [NRAR, 23] Hallock served as a bonder for Maryland Privateer Schooner Eagle (Commander James Kennere) on 24 August 1780. [NRAR, 279]


HALSEY, JEREMIAH

CT

Captain, Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron

"Commodore of all the armed vessels and watercraft on the Northern lakes"


Jeremiah Halsey was a native of Preston, Connecticut.[Bird, Navies In the Mountains, 138] He enlisted in Colonel Hinman's Connecticut regiment as a lieutenant, for service on the lakes, in June 1775. He was at Fort Ticonderoga on 24 June when Arnold's Mutiny occured and was a principal in quelling the mutiny. Colonel Hinman, the commander at Fort Ticonderoga, appointed him as "Commodore of all the armed vessels & crafts on the Northern Lakes"  [Force, IV, 3, 47. This is rendered as "Commodore of all Armed Vessels on Lake Champlain and Lake George" in Bird, Navies in the Mountains, 144] From about 25 June he assumed command of the Continental Army Sloop Enterprise as flagship. He was turned out by Schuyler when JAMES SMITH arrived at the post. Although Halsey at first talked about not rejoining his regiment and did his best to stir up dissention between the Connecticut troops and the New York generals, he evidently did so. He was appointed as assistant engineer at Fort St. Johns, to refurbish the barracks there following the fort's surrender. When news of the fall of Montreal reached Fort St. Johns, Halsey decamped for home, (about 16 November), taking his artificers with him and encouraging other men to leave to. Montgomery, in a hot fury, requested Schuyler to find him and make an example of him. [NDAR, "Brigadier General Richard Montgomery to Major General Philip Schuyler," 2, 1113-1114] Halsey, now "Capt," arrived in Connecticut on 27 November, passing himself off as an "express" with news of the fall of Montreal. [NDAR, "Connecticut Gazette, Friday, December 1, 1775," 2, 1221-1222]


HAM, WILLIAM

(A)

Lieutenant, Continental Navy


HAMILTON, JAMES

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


HAMILTON, JONAS

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


HAMILTON, THOMAS

VA

Captain of Marines, Virginia Marines


Thomas Hamilton was commissioned on 14 March 1776 as a Lieutenant of Marines in the Potomac River Department. [NOAR, 135] [Stewart, 196] He was promoted to First Lieutenant of Marines in January 1777, and to Captain of Marines on 17 March 1777, replacing ARELL. [Stewart, 196]


HAMILTON, WILLIAM

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


William Hamilton was reputed to have been a native of Ireland, coming to America at the beginning of the war against England to participate on the American side. He was on Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on 14 December 1775 when he enlisted as Sergeant of Marines aboard Continental Navy Ship Alfred. Hamilton served aboard Alfred during the New Providence Expedition and the Battle off Block Island with HM Frigate Glasgow. On 7 August 1776 Hamilton was transferred to Continental Navy Ship Columbus and served aboard her until about 10 October 1776. On that date he received $21 in wages from Commodore Esek Hopkins. Soon after, probably 20 October, he was transferred to Alfred and promoted to First Lieutenant of Marines. On 19 October JOHN PAUL JONES was assigned to Alfred as Captain, bringing with him Lieutenant of Marines EDMUND ARROWSMITH (promoted to Captain of Marines). Hamilton found Second Lieutenant of Marines ALEXANDER NELSON already aboard (from about 11 October). On 23 October Hamilton was a member of the court-martial of Gunner James Bryant of the Continental Navy Brig Hampden, held aboard the Alfred. Hamilton participated in the Cape Breton Expedition of 1 November 1776-16 December 1776, when Alfred arrived at Boston, Massachusetts. When Jones was relieved of command of the Alfred about 19 January 1777, Hamilton left the vessel, along with most of the crew and other officers. However, he was still assigned to her. Commodore ESEK HOPKINS had obtained Hamilton's commission by 9 February 1777, when Hopkins notified Alfred's new captain, ELISHA HINMAN, that he would forward it when he knew where Hamilton was. Hamilton was soon found and rejoined the Alfred. He sailed with her for France (with Continental Navy Ship Raleigh) in August 1777, and watched the convoy action that Raleigh fought with Druid. After wintering in France, Raleigh and Alfred sailed for America. On 9 March 1778 the pair encountered two British vessels, which were expertly handled, and Alfred was cut off and captured while Raleigh ran. Hamilton and his Captain of Marines, JOHN WELSH, were sent to Barbadoes, transferred to HMS Yarmouth, and taken to England, arriving 18 July 1778. There they were imprisoned in Forton Prison (Portsmouth). After several months of captivity the pair contrived to escape to France, where Welsh was issued funds to return to America. Hamilton's method of getting home is unknown, although he may have traveled with Welsh. Welsh joined the Continental Navy Ship Warren at Boston in mid-May 1779 as Captain of Marines. His First Lieutenant was William Hamilton. Aboard the Warren (DUDLEY SALTONSTALL) the men participated in the Penobscot Expedition. The Continental Marine units were engaged in heavy fighting during this expedition. On 26 July Welsh's Marines captured Banks Island. On 28 July the Marines landed on Bagaduce Peninsula against strong opposition. Welsh was killed and Hamilton mortally wounded. He was described as an "intrepid, placid young gentleman," who had discharged his duty with "fidelity and integrity." He was noted as having displayed the "greatest coolness and bravery" during the assault. [Smith, Marines, 445-446]


HAMMER, SOLOMON

PA

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


Solomon Hammer was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was commissioned on 1 June 1780 to the Pennsylvania Privateer Boat Tartar. [NOAR, 136] Hammer was re-commissioned to the Tartar on 25 August 1781. [NRAR, 472]


HAMMOND, J. L.

MA

Third Mate, Massachusetts Privateers


J. L. Hammond was a resident of Salem, or possibly Beverly, Massachusetts. On 14 August 1780 he was aboard the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Pilgrim (Commander JOSEPH ROBINSON) as Third Mate. [Howe, Beverly Privateers, 414, 428] He is probably not the same as the JOHN HAMMOND below.


HAMMOND, JOHN

MA

First Mate [Lieutenant], Massachusetts Privateers


John Hammond was a resident of Beverly, Massachusetts. He was First Mate [Lieutenant] on the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Active (Commander BENJAMIN ELLINGWOOD) on 6 July 1780. [Howe, Beverly Privateers, 428] He is probably a different man than the J. L. HAMMOND above.


HAMMOND, WILLIAM

MD

Owner, Maryland Privateers


William Hammond was a resident of Baltimore, Maryland. He was involved in privateer ventures with GOODWIN & RUSSELL of Baltimore, JAMES WILLIAMS of Annapolis, and THOMAS RUSSELL and STATIA HEPBURN. Vessels associated with Hammond were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

7/7/77

MD

Schooner Beggar’s Benison (4/6)

Thomas Steel

James Williams, William Hammond, Thomas Russell, Statia Hepburn

Thomas Steel, James Williams

[NRAR, 233]

6/8/78

MD

Brig Bacchus (6/18)

Charles Wells

William Hammond et al and Goodwin & Russell

Charles Wells, William Hammond

Thomas Johnson, Jr. [NRAR, 231]

6/8/79

MD

Brig Bantrus (6/18)

Charles Wells

William Hammond et al

Charles Wells, William Hammond

 


HAND, RECOMPENCE

NJ

Midshipman, Continental Navy


Recompence Hand was a native of Cape May, New Jersey. He signed aboard the Continental Navy Brig Lexington (Captain JOHN BARRY) as a Midshipman on 4 April 1776, receiving £7.10.0 as advance wages. [NDAR, IX, 502-507] Hand sailed with Lexington on her cruise to France under new Captain HENRY JOHNSON on 26 February 1777. He was aboard when a prize was captured on 6 March 1777, but died on 17 March.


HANDY, BENJAMIN

(A)

Lieutenant, Continental Navy


HANDY, CHARLES, JR.

RI

Commander, Rhode Island Privateers


Charles Handy, Jr., was commissioned to the Rhode Island Privateer [unknown] Yorick on 9 July 1782.[Sheffield, 62]


HANDY [HARDY], JAMES

(A)

Lieutenant, Continental Navy

Commander, Maryland Privateers


James Handy was a resident of Baltimore, Maryland. [NRAR, 217] On 11 October 1776 Handy was commissioned to the Maryland Privateer Schooner Harlequin, owned by George Woolsey and David Bowley & Co. of Baltimore. [NRAR, 326] Handy captured the valuable prize ship Lydia in late 1776. [see Harlequin] On 14 September 1778,  Handy was commissioned to the Maryland Privateer Sloop Abingdon, owned by Samuel and Robert Purviance of Baltimore. [NRAR, 217] Abingdon was captured by the British and taken into New York. She appears in the Admiralty court records as the Lord Abingdon, and Handy appears as James Hardy. [HCA 32/391/14/1-3] On 7 July 1781 he was commissioned to the Maryland Privateer Schooner Dragon, out of Baltimore and owned by Hugh Young & Co. [NRAR, 277]


HANSE [HANCE, HANS, NANCE], JACOB

PA

Captain, Pennsylvania Navy

First Mate, Pennsylvania Privateers


Jacob Hanse [Hance, Hans, Nance] was born about 1739. [NOAR, 137] He was commissioned as a Captain in the Pennsylvania Navy and assigned to the Pennsylvania Navy Boat Vulture on 1 February 1776. [NOAR, 137] He was transferred to the Pennsylvania Navy Boat Eagle on 1 July 1776. [NOAR, 137] [Jackson, 342, says he was commissioned on 16 April 1776 to the Eagle.] He was tansferred to the Pennsylvania Navy Boat Vulture about 1 October 1776, to replace WILLIAM GREENWAY. [NDAR, VI, 1122; Jackson, 342] Vulture was listed as having a crew of nine men, including Hanse, on 1 January 1777. [NDAR, VII, 834-835] Hanse advertised for a deserter on 25 June 1777, offering a $6 reward. [NDAR, IX, 168] Hanse’s crew list shows all sailors were sick, taken prisoner in Philadelphia, or had deserted in September 1777. The boat had been lost by 21 November 1777. [Jackson, 340] Hanse resigned on 6 March 1778. [Jackson, 342] On 26 July 1781 Hanse was appointed as First Mate on the Pennsylvania Privateer Brigantine Industry (Commander JOHN McCLENACHAN). On 19 July 1782, listing his age as 43, Hanse served as First Mate on the Pennsylvania Privateer Ship Fame (McClenachan again). [NOAR, 137]


HANSON, JOHN

MD

Commander, Maryland Privateers


John Hanson was a Midshipman in the Maryland Navy on 31 July 1776, assigned to the Maryland Navy Ship Defence. On 12 February 1779 he was commissioned to the Maryland Privateer Schooner James. [NOAR, 137-138] Hanson was commissioned to the Maryland Privateer Brig Viper on 17 August 1780. [NRAR, 487] In September 1781 Hanson and Viper were captured by the British vessel General Conway. [NOAR, 138]


HANNOWAY, SAMUEL

[See HANWAY, SAMUEL]


HANWAY [HANNOWAY], SAMUEL

VA

Captain of Marines, Virginia Marines


Samuel Hannoway [Cross, 21] (Hanway) [Stewart, 197] was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania on 26 September 1743. He moved to Charles County, Virginia in 1768, and from there to the Petersburg area. He engaged in trade to the West Indies in Petersburgh, and then moved to Amelia County. When the war broke out he raised a company of minutemen. Hanway was appointed as a Captain of Marines on 5 May 1776. [Stewart, 197] He resigned on 3 December 1776 to take command of a privateer. Hanway was commissioned as Commander of the Virginia Privateer [unknown] Nancy. He was captured about November 1779 by the Watt. [NOAR, 138] He removed to Monongalia County in 1781 and was appointed county surveyor on 3 January 1783. He was still alive in Morgantown in 1833. [Stewart, 197]


HARADEN, JONATHAN

MA

Captain, Massachusetts Navy


Captain of the Massachusetts Navy Brigantine Tyrannicide between 20 February 1777 and 31 August 1777, at a salary of £14.8.0 per month. On the 12 September 1777 he drew £1527.8.6 to pay the vessel's payroll through 31 August. [NDAR, 9, 913-916]


HARDIE, WILLIAM

PA

First Lieutenant, Pennsylvania Navy


On 1 February 1777 First Lieutenant JAMES BROWN of Pennsylvania Navy Fire Brigantine Vesuvius (Captain John Christie) was promoted to Captain and assigned to the Pennsylvania Navy Boat Tormentor. [NDAR, VI, 1060 and note, 1104 and note] To replace Brown, Christie recommended and requested, on 4 February, Second Lieutenant William Hardie of Pennsylvania Navy Galley Chatham. Hardie was duely appointed and promoted to Vesuvius. [NDAR, VII, 1104 and note]  Vesuvius was part of the mixed Pennsylvania Navy-Continental Navy fleet that engaged the British in September battles on the Delaware River. It was too much for Hardie, who deserted in September 1777. [NDAR, VII, 1104 and note] Vesuvius was part of the mixed Continental Navy-Pennsylvania Navy fleet at Marcus Hook in the late summer of 1777, watching the British shipping in the Delaware River. [NDAR, IX, 942 and note, 973-974]


HARDING, SETH

CT (P/A)

Captain, Continental Navy

Captain, Connecticut Navy

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Seth Harding was a resident of Norwich, Connecticut. He was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Brigantine Diana on 29 October 1782. [Middlebrook, Maritime Connecticyt During The Revolution, II, 71]


HARDY, ISHMAEL

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Ishmael Hardy commanded the Massachusetts Privateer Sloop Lady Washington  in early 1777. On 24 January 1777 she captured the ship Weathrill and brought her into Boston, Massachusetts on 5 March 1777. Francis Dana of Cambridge, Massachusetts appeared in the Maritime Court on 21 March, on behalf of Hardy. [Allen, MPR, 200, from the Boston Gazette of 7 April 1777] Hardy, listing his address as Salem, Massachusetts, was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Lyon (Lion) on 19 August 1777. [Allen, MPR, 206] Hardy was next commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Sloop Grampus, on 14 January 1778. [Allen, MPR, 157-158] His next commission was to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship General Hancock, on 23 June 1778. [Allen, MPR, 146] During the following cruise the General Hancock fell in with the British ship Levant (J. Martin), [Maclay, History of American Privateers, 118] bound from Jamaica to Bristol. An action began which had lasted over three hours when a shot from General Hancock penetrated Levant's powder magazine. She blew up and all her crew was lost except eighteen survivors rescued by the General Hancock. [Allen, MPR, 146, from the Continental Journal of 24 September 1778; Maclay, History of American Privateers, 118] Five Americans were killed in the battle, including Hardy. [Allen, ibid.]


HARDY, JAMES

[See HANDY, JAMES]


HARDY, JOHN

GA

Captain, Georgia Navy


Commanded Georgia Navy Galley Washington in March 1777.


HARDY, JOSEPH


(P/A)

Captain, Continental Marines


Joseph Hardy was a Midshipman aboard the Continental Navy Sloop Providence (JOHN PAUL JONES) on 20 September 1776, when the ship Alexander was captured. [NDAR, "List of Officers Seamen & Marines belonging to the Providence Sloop of War who are entitled to Shares in the Ship Alexander, Captur'd Sepr 20th 1776," 8, 46-48] He was commissioned as a Captain of Marines in October 1776. Hardy reported aboard the Continental Navy Ship Columbus (HOYSTEED HACKER) at Providence, Rhode Island, on 24 January 1777. [NDAR, "Shipping Articles for the Continental Navy Ship Columbus," 8, 118-120] On 3 April Hardy served on the court-martial of Third Lieutenant RICHARD MARVIN of the Continental Navy Ship Warren, held aboard Continental Navy Ship Providence, anchored off Fields Point in the Providence River. [NDAR, "Court-Martial of Lieutenant Richard Marvin of the Continental Navy Frigate Warren," 8, 263-266]


HARDYMAN, JOHN

VA

Captain of Marines, Virginia Marines


John Hardyman apparently served in the 2nd Virginia State Regiment earlier in the war. In late 1781 or early 1782 [Stewart, 197. But presumably after May 1782, when the Navy was more or less re-established, see Paullin, 416] he was appointed as a Captain of Marines in the Virginia Marines and assigned to the Virginia Navy Ship Cormorant (Captain JAMES MAXWELL). With his Lieutenants JOHN CLARK, LEWIS WEBB, and SELDEN,  he attempted to recruit Marines for the Cormorant, then lying at Hampton. [Stewart, 197] Hardyman was offering a bonus of $5 for every able-bodied soldier who entered and $10 for each recruit who had made one or more voyages to the West Indies or Europe. [Stewart, 122] Hardyman was presumably in service until the Cormorant was ordered sold in October 1782. [Cross, 79; Stewart, 126] He died 1 January 1808 in Elizabeth City County, Virginia.[Stewart, 197]


HARR, JOHN

Commander, Maryland Privateers

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


John Harr [NRAR, 223] or John Haw [NOAR, 140] was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was first commissioned to the Maryland Privateer Brig Donia Antoney on 29 November 1779. [NRAR, 276] Harr next was appointed to the Pennsylvania Privateer Schooner Betsey, commissioned 11 July 1780. [NRAR, 236] Pennsylvania Privateer Brig Ajax was his next command, to which he was commissioned on 6 January 1781. [NRAR, 223] Harr listed his age as 46 at this time. [NOAR, 140] On 11 August 1781, he was appointed to the Pennsylvania Privateer Brigantine Financier. [NRAR, 203] Harr now listed his age as 45. [NOAR, 140] His final privateer command was the Pennsylvania Privateer Brigantine Prince of Asturias, commissioned 6 April 1782. [NRAR, 421] Harr still listed his age as 45. [NOAR, 140]


HARRIS, JOHN

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


HARRIS, JOHN

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines

'

Listed twice in Paullin [515].


HARRIS, JOHN

MA

Prize Master, Massachusetts Privateers


John Harris was listed as a prize master on the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Pilgrim (Commander JOSEPH ROBINSON) on 14 August 1780.[Howe, Beverly Privateers, 414]


HARRIS, JOHN

VA

Captain, Virginia Navy


John Harris was said to be born in Wales. He was commissioned as First Lieutenant aboard the Virginia Navy Galley Manley in the spring of 1776. [Stewart, 198]

On 24 October the Virginia Navy Board ordered  Harris to go to Warwick, where the Virginia Navy Brig Musquetto (Captain ISAAC YOUNGHUSBAND) was fitting out, supercede Younghusband, and proceed with the brig to Jamestown. [NDAR, VI, 1409 and note] [First] Lieutenant of Marines JACOB VALENTINE was ordered to place himself under Harris’ orders, and put his company aboard the Musquetto. [NDAR, VI, 1410] The brig was now dispatched from Warwick to Portsmouth, by way of Jamestown, to complete her fitting out process. She was to be supplied with stores in preparation for a six months’ cruise by John Herbert, at Portsmouth. [Stewart, Virginia’s Navy, 34] On 31 October he was recommended for promotion to Captain of the Virginia Navy Brig Raleigh. [Stewart, Virginia’s Navy, 198] Harris now resumed the task of fitting out the brig. On 1 November 1776 the Navy Board ordered Virginia Navy Sloop Defiance (Captain Eleazer Callender) to turn over her excess men to Musquetto. [NDAR, VII, 12-13] The next day the Navy Board directed Virginia Navy Sloop Congress to go down to Portsmouth, Virginia (where Musquetto now lay) and turn over eight cannon, surplus small arms and other munitions to Harris. [NDAR, VII, 22] On 4 November Virginia Navy Sloop Scorpion was directed to turn over four 4-pounders to the brig. [NDAR, VII, 42] Musquetto continued to receive officers and men from other vessels throughout this period. Harris now became involved in two legal matters, one not of his making. On 5 December 1776, in view of a complaint lodged against Captain Wright Westscott of the sloop Scorpion, charging him with drunkeness and cowardice, Harris was ordered to take affidavits from various witnesses and transmit them to the Navy Board. [NDAR, VII, 378] Two days later another unsavory incident came to light. Supercargo Thomas De Saussive, of the sloop Maria, recently arrived from St. Eustatia, complained to the Navy Board that Harris had stopped his vessel and impressed three of the crew. The Navy Board was not pleased and ordered the men freed immediately. [NDAR, VII, 405 and note] On 29 January 1777 Harris was advanced £120 by the Navy Board to recruit sailors for the crew. [NDAR, VII, 1054-1055]

The Navy Board considered Musquetto ready for sea. On 5 February the Navy Board recommended that Musquetto be sent to sea, to patrol in the West Indies. This recommendation was based on the (only partially true) information that the French ports were open to trial and condemnation of American prizes. [NDAR, VII, 1114] The next day  First Commissioner Thomas Whiting sent the sailing orders: Musquetto was ordered to cruise from 150 to 300 miles to windward of the West Indies for six months. Prizes were to be ordered to Martinique or Guadeloupe, consigned to the Virginia agents at those places (Richard Harrison and Abraham Van Bibber; also Van Bibber & Harrison). [NDAR, 1131 and notes] She sailed immediately. [Stewart,35] The prizes John and Noble (a British Transport) were captured before Harris made St. Pierre. [Stewart, 35-36; Cross, 41]  The crew, meanwhile, was down with smallpox, having been inoculated to prevent the disease ravaging the crew. There was “little loss except for time.” [Stewart, 36]

By early May 1777 Musquetto was at St. Pierre, Martinique. Here Harris received a letter, dated 5 May 1777, from an unusual visitor. The letter was from the Virginia agent, Richard Harrison. It introduced the visitor, a merchant of Guadeloupe, Monsieur Lafine. It seems that Lafine had gone to see Harrison on behalf of Monsieurs Angeron and Rolland of Basseterre, Guadeloupe. They wished to fit out a privateer to prey on the British and wanted a privateering commission for her, which Harrison was unable to give. However, Harrison suggested in his letter to Harris, if Harris’ commission were copied out, certified as a true copy, and given to Lafine, then the merchants could use it for their vessel. It could be posed as a tender to the Musquetto. Harrison also hoped this little maneuver would aid in producing a Franco-British war. Harris obliged Monsieur Lafine. [NDAR, VIII, 918 and note] Sometime later, Musquetto sailed over to Guadeloupe, perhaps to help fit out her “tender.” On 5 June a letter was written from Martinique reporting that Harris had written. By that date he had left Guadeloupe. [Stewart, 36]

About the first of June 1777 Musquetto sailed again. She was thirty miles east of Barbadoes on 4 June 1777, [NDAR, IX, 19-20] when she was sighted by HM Frigate Ariadne, which promptly gave chase. After a long chase the Ariadne began to close on the Musquetto, and Harris threw over his guns to lighten the brig. [NDAR, IX, 322-324] Ariadne opened fire with bow chasers, and, closing in, added several vollies of small arms fire before Harris gave up at 2200. A prize crew of a mate, midshipman, and twelve sailors went over to Musquetto and the prisoners were removed.  [NDAR, IX, 19-20] The next day the prize was brought into Carlisle Bay, Barbados. Fifty-six of the prisoners were landed on the 6th and placed in close confinement in the jail, pending orders from England on their disposition. [NDAR, IX, 46 and note]

On 19 June, James Smith, an agent at St. Eustatius, reported the loss, noting that Harris and his crew were sent “home” (to England) with a number of other prisoners in the convoy that sailed from St. Kitts on 16 June. [Stewart, 37] On 25 June Van Bibber and Harrison reported the brig’s capture and added “The Sailors we are told are all in Gaol at Barbadoes but the Capt & other officers are carried to Antigua, from wherever they will be transported to England. It seems prisons are thus fitted up for the reception of all Americans who have the ill fortune to fall into their hands (no matter where) but more particularly those taken in armed vessels.” [Cross, 41] John Ball reported the capture on 10 July 1777. He said the Musquetto was taken into St. Johns, Antigua, noting that the Ariadne was much faster than the Musquetto, and that the prisoners had been sent to England in the “June fleet.” [Stewart, 37]

Harris and his fellow officers were indeed “transported” to England. They were committed to Forton Prison on 8 August 1777. Forton Gaol was formerly Queen Anne’s Hospital, located at Portsea, a suburb of Portsmouth. When the building had become too run down and old for use as a hospital it was converted to a prison. [Cross, 41]  The place was a damp, dirty, four stoty masonry structure. The prisoners were considered rebels and placed on an allowance of food that was only two thirds of that formerly allowed prisoners of war. [Cross, 42]

A prisoner there recorded the reception Harris and his officers faced: “Aug 9 this day came on shore forty nine American prisoners. Among them were three captains of armed vessels, viz. Captain Courter of the ‘Oliver Cromwell,’ Captain Harris of the ‘Miscator’ and Captain Hill of the ‘Montgomery.’ The Agent made it his business to make them deliver up their money by the point of the bayonet. There is no such thing as refusing.” [Stewart, 37]

On 15 April 1778 the Virginia Navy Board ordered necessaries delivered to his daughter Amelia, since Harris, “now a prisoner” “on his paying for the same.” Harris’ wife died while he was in prison. [Stewart, 198]

It was on Friday, July 2, 1779, after twenty-three months of imprisonment, that Captain Harris and a number of his fellow pris­oners were exchanged. John Kilby, a seaman from the privateer Sturdy Beggar, described the exchange: “At last the day and hour of exchange were announced to us . . . The agent appointed for that purpose, A Mr. Hurum, called all of our names, and then read to us these words, to wit: ‘You all now have received His Majesty’s most gracious pardon.’ At that time there was a loud cry from many of our men: ‘Damn his Majesty and his pardon too.’ The gates were opened and one hundred of us . . . were marched out under a guard. There were one hundred of us with Captain John Harris at our head. We were accompanied by fine music. Some of our boys cried out ‘Give us Yankee Doodle’ and they certainly did play it for us all the way down through the town . . .” [Cross, 42]

Harris got to Nantes, where he obtained funds from the American Commissioners, Franklin and Lee. [Stewart, 40-41] He returned to Virginia late in 1779, to find his wife had died in his absence. He was given command of the Oliver Cromwell. A visit to Richmond was recorded on 8 January 1780. Harris died in the spring of 1782. [Stewart, 41]


HARRIS, JONATHAN

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Jonathan Harris was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was associated in the following privateers, with THOMAS HARRIS:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

10/14/78

MA

Brigantine Vagrant (10/45)

John Conway

Jonathan Harris, Thomas Harris, et al

John Conway, Jonathan Harris, Thomas Harris

[Allen, MPR, 313]


HARRIS, ROBERT

(A)

Lieutenant, Continental Navy

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


Robert Harris was appointed commander of the Pennsylvania Privateer Schooner Betsey on 16 September 1779, a vessel owned by Alexander Stewart & Co. [NRAR, 235] On 2 September 1780 he was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Brig Marbois, owned by Isaac Moses and Matthew Clarkson. [NRAR, 382] Harris appears as a co-owner and a bonder for the Pennsylvania Privateer Boat Spy (Commander David McCullough) on 28 September 1781. He listed Philadelphia as his address. [NRAR, 462] On 18 February 1782 he was appointed to the Virginia Privateer Brig Perseverance, owned by William Pennock & Co. [NRAR, 413]


HARRIS, THOMAS

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Thomas Harris was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was associated in the following privateers, with JONATHAN HARRIS:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

10/14/78

MA

Brigantine Vagrant (10/45)

John Conway

Jonathan Harris, Thomas Harris, et al

John Conway, Jonathan Harris, Thomas Harris

[Allen, MPR, 313]


HARRIS, W.

PA

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


W. Harris, probably of Pennsylvania, was in command of the Pennsylvania Privateer [unknown] Beaver. She was possibly at sea in 1778. [Maclay, History of American Privateers, 73]


HARRISON, GILBERT

NC

Commander, North Carolina Privateers


Gilbert Harrison was a resident of White Oak, North Carolina, in the area of Cape Fear. In November 1780 he was in command of the North Carolina Privateer Brig Bellona, which sailed on a cruise in late November. On 2 December 1780 Bellona was wrecked on Anastasia Island, East Florida. The crew were taken prisoners. Harrison and part of the crew were sent to Charleston, presumably to the prison ship there, on 10 February 1781. [see Bellona]


HARRISON, JOHN

PA

Captain, Pennsylvania Navy

Commander, Maryland Privateers

First Lieutenant, Pennsylvania Privateers


John Harrison was commissioned as a Captain in the Pennsylvania Navy on 7 April 1777 and assigned to the Pennsylvania Navy Boat Repulse. On 30 April 1777 he was transferred to the Pennsylvania Navy Galley Rxperiment. In the Experiment Harrison participated in the Delaware River campaign of September-November 1777. Experiment escaped upriver with the fleet on the morning of 20 November 1777. He was transferred, on 31 December 1777 to the Pennsylvania Navy Galley Dickinson. Harrison was discharged on 17 August 1778. [Jackson, 338] A John Harrison (supposed to be from Annapolis, Maryland, but that is doubtful) was appointed as First Mate on the Maryland Privateer Sloop Porpus [Porpoise] (Commander Nicholas Martin) on 23 April 1779. Martin was a Philadelphia resident. [NRAR, 419] Harrison, now listing has address as Annapolis, Maryland, was commissioned as Commander of the Maryland Privateer Sloop General Lincoln on 25 September 1779. [NRAR, 311] On 16 March 1781 Harrison was appointed as First Lieutenant aboard the Pennsylvania Privateer Ship Rising Sun (Commander Samuel Cassan). On 5 July 1781 he was reappointed to the same office on the same privateer with the same commander. [NRAR, 445]


HARRISON, RICHARD

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


HARRISON, RICHARD


Agent for Maryland and Virginia at St. Pierre, Martinique.


HART, JOHN

NH

Commander, New Hampshire Privateers

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


John Hart was a resident of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. He was commissioned to the New Hampshire Privateer Ship Portsmouth on 7 June 1777. [NRAR, 420] Portsmouth sailed for France about August 1777 and arrived at Bordeaux on 10 October 1777. One prize, the brigantine Mercury, was captured. After a refit at Bordeaux, Portsmouth sailed from there on 11 November 1777, in company with the Maryland Privateer Schooner Swallow (Commander JOHN MARTIN). The two captured the brigantine Emperor of Germany as they were going out, thus creating a diplomatic incident as she was taken in neutral waters. The brig George was taken on 13 November by the Portsmouth. Hart was very disappointed in his treatment in France. [See Portsmouth for details] Hart commanded the Massachusetts (or New Hampshire) Privateer Brigantine Bennington in May 1779. He captured one prize in the Bennington. [see Bennington]


HART, WILLIAM

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


William Hart was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Galley Volunteer on 13 May 1782. [NRAR, 488]


HARVEY, JOHN

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


John Harvey was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts when he was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Boat Caesar on 7 August 1782. [NRAR, 245; Allen, MPR, 90]


HARVIE [HARVEY], JOHN

PA

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


John Harvie was, presumably, a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. On 27 February 1778 he signed a bond for the Pennsylvania Privateer Boat Otter, owned by John Campbell & Co. Presumably Harvie was the commander of the privateer. [NRAR, 408] This is probably the same John Harvey who was First Mate on the Maryland Privateer Schooner Swallow (Commander WILLIAM BOWEN), commissioned on 16 October 1778. [NOAR, 143]


HATCH, ELNATHAN

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Elnathan Hatch was a resident of East Haddam, Connecticut. He was appointed as First Lieutenant on the Connecticut Privateer Brigantine Martial (also Marshall; Commander NATHAN POST) [NOAR, 144] on 5 April 1782. [see Marshall] He was described as age 35, 5′8′′ tall, with a dark complexion, blue eyes and black hair. [NOAR, 144] He made one cruise in the Martial in which the Matilda was captured. [see Marshall] Hatch was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Galley Shelally on 15 July 1782. [NOAR, 144]


HATCHER.

GA

Captain, Georgia Navy


Commanded Georgia Navy Galley Bulloch in March 1777, during the invasion of East Florida.


HATTER, JOHN

SC

Commander, South Carolina Privateers


John Hatter was in command of the South Carolina Privateer Snow Hope in 1776. [Coker, 300]


HAVENS, WILLIAM

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


William Havens was a resident of New London, Connecticut. [Middlebrook, Maritime Connecticut During The Revolution, II, 54-55] In June 1778 he became commander of the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Beaver. Under Havens, the Beaver captured, in October 1778, the sloop Lord Howe. On 29 January 1779 Beaver assisted in the capture of the British Privateer Brig Ranger, brig Peter, and brig Thomas and William. All these vessels were cut out of Sag Harbor, Long, Island, New York. [Middlebrook, Maritime Connecticut During The Revolution, II, 54-55] In April 1779 Havens sailed with the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Hancock (Commander Elisha Hinman) on a succession of short cruises during which twelve prizes were captured, including six British privateers. Havens continued to sail in short cruises out of New London throughout 1779, sometimes joining with other privateers. By December he had racked up twenty-two prizes in the Beaver. [see Beaver] By March 1780 Havens had left the Beaver. He was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Jay on 1 February 1781. [NRAR, 358] In the Jay he captured the brig Success on 22 June 1781, and the brigantine Mary and Margaret in July 1781. [NOAR, 144-145] On 6 September 1781 he was re-commissioned to the Jay. [NRAR, 358] Jay was probably lost the same day as the British raid on New London took place on 6 September.


HAWKINS, ABRAHAM

(A)

Lieutenant, Continental Navy


HAWLEY, DAVID

CT

Captain, Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron

[First Lieutenant], Continental Navy

Second Lieutenant, Connecticut Navy


David Hawley was a native of Connecticut. In March 1776 he was master of the sloop Sally, sailing out of New Haven with a miscellaneous cargo. On 21 March the sloop was captured by HM Sloop Tender Hawke. [NDAR, 4, 451] Hawley was put aboard HM Frigate Rose, and taken to Newport, where he was allowed to visit the Sally, only to find his possessions stolen. The British offered him money and land to join them, but he refused [NDAR, 5, 168-169] and Hawley was put aboard HM Frigate Glasgow as a prisoner. [NDAR, 4, 451 and note] Hawley was detained aboard the Glasgow and was aboard her to watch the poor handling of the American fleet during the Battle of Block Island on 6 April 1776. [NDAR, 5, 168-169] On 20 April Hawley was delivered to Halifax, Nova Scotia. After two weeks he escaped with eight others in a small boat and arrived at Hartford on 18 May. [NDAR, 5, 168-169] This experience presumably prompted Hawley's seeking and obtaining, on 11 July 1776, appointment as Second Lieutenant in the Connecticut Navy, aboard Connecticut Navy Ship Oliver Cromwell. [NDAR, 5, 1027] However, when the crisis on Lake Champlain developed, Hawley was one of two captains appointed by Governor Jonathan Trumbull to recruit sailors for the Lake. Hawley enrolled on 9 August 1776, and recruited two lieutenants and twenty-five sailors by 25 August 1776, [NDAR, 6, 984-985] mostly from the Connecticut regiments at New York. [NDAR, 5, 203-204] Hawley's recruits arrived at Fort Ticonderoga by 19 September 1776 and he was nominated to command the Continental Army Lake Champlain Schooner Royal Savage immediately. [NDAR, 6, 902] He and his recruits joined the vessel on 21 September 1776, at Bay St. Amand. [NDAR, 6, 925-926] Hawley remained aboard the Royal Savage until she was destroyed during the Battle of Valcour Island on 11 October 1776, partly due to "bad management," according to Arnold. Hawley was probably aboard the Continental Army Galley Congress during the escape from Valcour Island and the Battle of Split Rock on 13 October 1776. [However, Bird, Navies, 210, says he was reassigned to the Washington, and was therefore, captured] By early May 1777 he was back in Connecticut, commanding the Continental Army Sloop Schuyler, [NDAR, 8, 978-979], stationed at Norwalk. [NDAR, 9, 327] Between 27 May and 30 July, Hawley captured eight small Tory vessels running supplies to Long Island. [NDAR, 9, 5-6, 17, 167, 326-327, 703-704, 730-731] This may be the same David Hawley who was commissioned as Commander of the Massachusetts Privateer Sloop Seaflower on 13 May 1782. He lists his address as Boston, and was co-owner and a bonder. [NRAR, 457]


HAWLEY, EPHRAIM

CT

Second Lieutenant, Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron


Ephraim Hawley was a native of Connecticut and was enlisted as a Second Lieutenant by Captain DAVID HAWLEY (a relative) on 19 August 1776. [NDAR, 6, 984-985] It is believed that hAWLEY served aboard the Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron Schooner Royal Savage.


HAYDEN, URIAH

CT

Naval Constructor, Connecticut Navy


Uriah Hayden was the master builder (shipwright) who was building the Connecticut Navy Ship Oliver Cromwell at Saybrook in early 1776. [NDAR, 5, 121] The construction was done in Hayden's yard. [NDAR, 5, 409-410] On 16 May 1776 he drew L500 from the Council of Safety for the materials and the work. [NDAR, 5, 121] The ship was launched on 13 June 1776. [NDAR, 5, 410 and note] On 19 June he received an additional L400 from the Council of Safety for the work. [NDAR, 5, 624-625] On 3 September 1776 he drew another L300 from the Council of Safety, [NDAR, 6, 662] and another L200 on 23 October 1776. [NDAR, 6, 1381]


HAYES, JOHN

[See HAYS, JOHN]


HAYS, JOHN

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


John Hays [or Hayes] was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Batchelor [Batchelder, Batcheldor] on 26 February 1778. [see Batchelor]


HAZARD, JOHN


(P)

Captain, Continental Marines


HAZARD, JOHN

(P/A)

Captain, Continental Navy


HAZELL, BENJAMIN

SC

Commander, South Carolina Privateers


Benjamin Hazell was in command of the South Carolina Privateer Sloop Betsey in 1777. [Coker, 300]


HAZELWOOD, JOHN

PA

Commodore, Pennsylvania Navy


Appointed as Superintendent of fire rafts on 28 December 1775; additional duties added as commander of guard boats and second in command on 1 October 1776; recommended again for the same post with orders for direction of the fleet to by-pass Seymour on 1 April 1777; promoted to Commodore 6 September 1777, discharged 17 August 1778. [Jackson, 334]


HAZELWOOD, THOMAS

PA

Captain, Pennsylvania Navy


Thomas Hazelwood was the son of Commodore John Hazelwood of the Pennsylvania Navy. [Jackson, 465n8] He was commissioned as a Captain in the Pennsylvania Navy on 1 February 1777 and assigned to the Pennsylvania Navy Boat Fame. [Jackson, 342] Hazelwood served aboard the Fame during the Delaware River campaign of September-November 1777. Fame was among those boats which escaped up river on the morning of 20 November 1777. On 17 August 1778 he was given permission to command a privateer. [Jackson, 342] There is no record of Hazelwood commanding a privateer and he soon returned to the Fame. In December 1778, Hazelwood requested and received permission to make an independent voyage to the West Indies. [Jackson, 303] He was still in Pennsylvania in February 1779 however, when he accompanied General Louis Le Beque Duportail and a small party in a survey of the Delaware River defenses. [Jackson, 323]


HEAD, JOHN

MA

[Owner], Massachusetts Privateers


John Head was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was associated with JOHN BLAKE in privateering. Vessels associated with Blake were:

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

8/21/77

MA

Schooner Buckram (4/45)

John Cross

John Blake et al

John Cross, John Blake, John Head

[NRAR, 245; Allen, MPR, 89]


HESTER, JOHN

[NY]

First Mate [Lieutenant], New York Privateers


John Hester, possibly of New York, served aboard the New York Privateer Sloop Beaver, commissioned on 29 June 1776 under Commander STEWART DEANE, as First Mate (or First Lieutenant). On her first cruise, to St. Eustatius, Netherlands West Indies, with New York Privateer Brigantine Enterprise (Commander JOSEPH DWIGHT), a rich prize, the ship Earl of Errol, was captured. Beaver was back in port by 11 October 1776. [see Beaver]


HEGEY, ALEXANDER

[MD]

Commander, Maryland Privateers


Alexander Hegey was commissioned to the Maryland Privateer Ship Audacious on 29 November 1782, owned by Peter Whiteside & Co. of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [Archives of Maryland: 48:311]


HEMPSTED, SAMUEL

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


HENDER, THOMAS

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Thomas Hender was in command of the Connecticut Privateer Schooner Dolphin in August 1778. He captured an unnamed 45-ton sloop (Thomas Anthony) on 17 August 1778. [Middlebrook, MCR, II, 72]


HENDERSON, DANIEL

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


HENNESSEY, JOHN

(A)

Lieutenant, Continental Navy

[Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers]


John "Hennessy," presumably of Philadelphia, was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Schooner Humming Bird on 2 August 1779, a vessel owned by Alexander Nelson and Edward Fox & Co. of Philadelphia. [NRAR, 346]


HENRY, GEORGE

PA

Owner, Pennsylvania Privateers


George Henry was a merchant and resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was associated in privateering with JAMES WHARTON, JAMES ASH, ROBERT KNOX, FRANCIS GURNEY, HUGH LENNOX, ABRAHAM MARKOE, DAVID LENOX, JAMES JOSIAH, JOHN HUNN, and JOHN HOOD. Vessels associated with Henry were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

12/24/78

PA

Brigantine Le Gerard (10/30)

James Josiah

George Henry & Co.

George Henry, James Josiah

Timothy Matlack, James Trimble [NRAR, 371]

12/11/79

PA

Ship General Greene (14/40)

James Montgomery

George Henry, James Wharton & Co.

George Henry, James Ash

Waters Sitton, James Trimble [NRAR, 309]

3/13/80

PA

Ship General Greene (16/45)

William Burke

George Henry, James Wharton & Co.

George Henry, Robert Knox

James Trimble [NRAR, 310]

9/29/80

PA

Ship General Greene (18/100)

Samuel Carson

James Ash, George Henry & Co.

James Ash, William Hall

W. Stretch, James Trimble [NRAR, 310]

11/15/80

PA

Ship Anne (10/30)

James Josiah

George Henry, Robert Knox & Co.

George Henry, James Josiah

James Trimble [NRAR, 226]

6/30/81

PA

Sloop Jane (6/20)

Samuel Young

Francis Gurney & Co., Hugh Lennox, George Henry et al

Samuel Young, Hugh Lennox

George Cooper, James Trimble [NRAR, 356]

10/12/81

PA

Sloop Jane (4/20)

Jacob De Hart

Francis Gurney & Co., George Henry, Abraham Markoe et al

Jacob De Hart, Francis Gurney

James Trimble [NRAR, 357]

12/22/81

PA

Ship Queen of France (12/50)

John Hunn

George Henry, Robert Knox & Co.

George Henry, John Hunn

James Trimble [NRAR, 424]

1/7/82

PA

Ship Anne (10/30)

John Ashmead

George Henry, David Lenox et al

Robert Knox, John Ashmead

James Trimble [NRAR, 226]

4/13/82

PA

Brigantine Sally (12/20)

John Fleming

George Henry, James Josiah

John Fleming, [George Henry]

James Trimble [NRAR, 453]

8/10/82

PA

Ship Queen of France (12/45)

Richard Dale

George Henry, James Josiah, John Hunn, John Hood

George Henry, James Josiah

James Trimble [NRAR, 424]

8/10/82

PA

Ship Washington (18/100)

James Josiah

George Henry, James Josiah, Robert Knox

James Josiah, George Henry

James Trimble [NRAR, 490]


HEPBURN, PETER

Captain, Continental Army Lake George Squadron


Peter Hepburn is shown as being at Fort George on 26 June 1777, but not assigned to any particular vessel. [NDAR, 9, 174]


HEPBURN, STATIA

MD

Owner, Maryland Privateers


Statia Hepburn of Maryland was associated in privateering with JAMES WILLIAMS, WILLIAM HAMMOND and THOMAS RUSSELL. Vessels associated with Hepburn were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

7/7/77

MD

Schooner Beggar’s Benison (4/6)

Thomas Steel

James Williams, William Hammond, Thomas Russell, Statia Hepburn

Thomas Steel, James Williams

[NRAR, 233]


HERBERT, ARGILL [ARGIL, ARGYLE]

VA

First Lieutenant, Virginia Navy


Argill Herbert was commissioned as a First Lieutenant in the Virginia Navy on 12 July 1776 and served aboard the Virginia Navy Galley Norfolk Revenge (Captain JOHN CALVERT). He was dissatisfied with Calvert and was assigned to the Virginia Navy Galley Caswell (Captain WILLIS WILSON) on 22 November 1776. [NOAR, 148] However, Calvert was in the Virginia Navy Sloop Defiance in September 1776, [Stewart, 160] and Herbert is referred to as the “Commander” of the Norfolk Revenge, so he apparently commanded the galley for a time. He was transferred to the Caswell on 5 December 1776. Herbert resigned on 29 April 1779. [Stewart, 200]


HERBERT, THOMAS

VA

Captain, Virginia Navy


Thomas Herbert was a resident of Elizabeth City County. He had suffered the loss of his left hand in some way before the war and wore a prosthesis device, made from silver or silver colored metal. From this was derived his nickname, “Silverfist.” [Stewart, 201] He was First Lieutenant of the Virginia Navy Brig Liberty, being commissioned on 1 June 1777, [Stewart, 201] although he was apparently aboard late in 1776. [Stewart, 45 note] He commanded the Liberty on a voyage to Nantes, France, and captured several prizes in a subsequent patrol. Later he commanded a flotilla of small craft during the siege of Yorktown, providing supplies to Washington’s army. After the war he lived in Portsmouth, and died on 1 September 1799. [Stewart, 201] His brothers JOHN HERBERT and PASCOW HERBERT also served in the Virginia Navy.


HERRICK, SAMUEL


Samuel Herrick apparently enlisted in Arnold's Massachusetts regiment on 3 May 1775. He was in charge of the detatchment which captured Skenesborough on 11 May 1775, seizing the soon to be renamed schooner Liberty. Herrick apparemtly remained to garrison Skenesborough when the schooner sailed up the lake. [NDAR, "Colonel Benedict Arnold to the Massachusetts Committee of Safety, Cambridge," 1, 364-367] [NDAR, "Journal Kept by Eleazer Oswald on Lake Champlain," 1, 327 and 330; "Colonel Benedict Arnold to the Massachusetts Committee of Safety," 1, 330]


HEWET, JOSIAH

[CT]

Second Mate, Connecticut Privateers


Josiah Hewet was aboard the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Nancy (Commander ROBERT PALMER) in June 1777 as Master. On 30 June Nancy was captured by HM Frigate Unicorn. Hewet was a prisoner at Newport in October 1777, but had been exchanged by 5 November 1777. [see Nancy]


HIGGINSON, STEPHEN

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Stephen Higginson was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was associated with the following privateers:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

11/30/81

MA

Ship Adventure (8/20)

Edward Bacon, Jr.

Stephen Higginson et al

Edward Bacon, Jr., Stephen Higginson

[NRAR, 222]


HILL, BENJAMIN

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Benjamin Hill was a resident of Newburyport, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Bemus [Behmus] on 28 December 1778. [see Behmus]


HILL, HUGH

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Hugh Hill was born in Carrickfergus, Ireland in 1741 and had immigrated to America as a young man, settling in Marblehead, Massachusetts. Later he listed his residence as Beverly, Massachusetts. Hill was a patriot, a cousin of Andrew Jackson (later President Andrew Jackson), and from a good family. He was “Of immense size, muscular beyond the common, courageous almost to rashness, courteous to the fair sex and not burdened with scruples . . .” [Howe, Beverly Privateers in the Revolution, 349] The story is told that once, in L’Orient, France, Hill was in a cabaret. A French gentleman present felt he had been insulted by Hill and offered to send his seconds to see Hill in the morning to arrange a duel. “What is the matter with here and now?” said Hill, drawing two pistols from his belt and offering one to the French gentleman. There was no duel. [Howe, Beverly Privateers in the Revolution, 349] Hill was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Pilgrim on 12 September 1778, a purpose-built privateer owned by the Cabot syndicate. [Howe, Beverly Privateers in the Revolution, 414; Allen, Massachusetts Privateers of the Revolution, 237] Under Hill the Pilgrim made at least one cruise to Europe, taking a number of prizes and fighting an action with the British privateer Success. [see Pilgrim] Hill left the Pilgrim about March 1780. [Howe, Beverly Privateers in the Revolution, 350] On 16 January 1781 Hill was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Cicero, [Howe, Beverly Privateers in the Revolution, 407] another Cabot owned vessel. [Maclay, History of American Privateers, 163] In the Cicero, Hill made at least two voyages to Europe, capturing several prizes. He may have left the Cicero in about mid-1782. [see Cicero] Hill died in 1829. [NOAR, 130-131]


HILL, STEPHEN

MA/(A)

Lieutenant, Continental Navy

[Commander, Massachusetts Privateers]


This may be the same person as the Stephen "Hills" commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Maria on 26 November 1781, owned by Jarvis & Russell of Boston. Hills listed his address as Boston. [NRAR, 383]


HILLIARD, BENJAMIN

CT

First Lieutenant, Connecticut Privateers


Benjamin Hilliard was First Lieutenant aboard the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Beaver (Commander DANIEL SCOVELL), commissioned on 4 March 1780. On 22 March 1780, at 39°N, Beaver was captured by HM Frigate Galatea (Captain James Reid) and HM Cutter Tender Retaliation (tender to the Thames; Lieutenant William Skinner). Beaver was taken into New York. On 27 March the entire crew of seventy-eight men was turned over to the prison ships at New York. Hilliard gave a deposition for Beaver’s trial on 16 April 1780. [Middlebrook, MCR, II, 55-60] Hilliard was exchanged and served as Lieutenant on the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Eagle (Commander WILLIAM LEEDS), commissioned 4 May 1782. One prize was captured on the following cruise. Eliza was sold at Havana, Cuba about August 1782. [Middlebrook, II, 80]


HILLIARD

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


One Hilliard apparently commanded the Connecticut Privateer Schooner Young Cromwell in June 1781. On 24 June 1781 he brought the new brig Neptune into port. She had been captured by the British ship Assurance. Neptune was bound from the Piscataqua River to Martinique with a cargo of fish and lumber aboard. Assurance’s prize crew of a midshipman and nine men were kept as prisoners. [Middlebrook, MCR, II, 247] This may be the same man as BENJAMIN HILLIARD.


HILTON, BENJAMIN

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Benjamin Hilton was a native of Salem, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Viper 23 July 1782. [NRAR, 487]


HINCHBORN, BENJAMIN

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

7/31/81

MA

Galley Reprisal (4/25)

Benjamin Frizel

Benjamin Hinchborn et al

Benjamin Frizel, Benjamin Hinchborn, Samuel Gardner

Joseph Pierce, Joseph Hall, Jr. [NRAR, 436; Allen, MPR, 255]

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

7/10/77

MA

Brigantine Zanga (16/110)

Arthur Crawford

Perez Morton et al

Perez Morton, Benjamin Hinchborn

[Allen, MPR, 330]


HINKLEY, JOHN

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

10/[1]/76

MA

Schooner Active (6/65)

Andrew Gardner

Nehemiah Somes, Joseph Pierce, Eleazer Johnson, Thomas Melvill, John Hinkley

Andrew Gardner, Joseph Pierce, Nehemiah Somes

[NDAR, VI, 1213 and note]


HINMAN, ELISHA


CT (P/A)

Captain, Continental Navy

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Elisha Hinman was born in 1734 in Stonington, Connecticut, a "beautiful little fishing village" near Rhode Island. He became involved in the West Indian and European trade, and is reputed to have commanded a merchant brig when he was only nineteen. About 1760 he settled in New London, where he prospered and acquired considerable property. Benedict Arnold was numbered among Hinman's friends and dinner guests before the war. [Morgan, 59] In July 1775 he made a voyage in the employ of Nathaniel Shaw, Jr of New London, proceeding to Martinique for a cargo of gunpowder. He returned home on 24 December 1775 with two tons of powder, landing at Bedford, Massachusetts.

Hinman found Captain DUDLEY SALTONSTALL's agents were recruiting for Continental Navy Ship Alfred and that he could be First Lieutenant aboard her if he so chose. Hinman recruited forty-eight men (less one who died) and sailed on the sloop Lizard (Joshua Hempstead, Jr.) for Delaware Bay on 19 January 1776. Other officers and recruits sailed with him. The Lizard landed these recruits in New Jersey for some reason, and Commodore ESEK HOPKINS sent the Continental Navy Sloop Fly to pick them up on 10 February 1776. When they arrived at the fleet Hinman was assigned to the Continental Navy Brig Cabot (Captain JOHN BURROUGHS HOPKINS) to replace First Lieutenant HOYSTED HACKER, commanding the Fly. Hinman participated in all the actions of the New Providence Expedition and the Battle off Block Island of 6 April 1776.

He was commissioned as a Captain in the Continental Navy on 13 August 1776. [NOAR, 152] Hinman was ranked as the twentieth captain in the Navy on 10 October 1776, and commanded the Cabot in November 1775. [NOAR, 152] Hinman in Boston by 28 January 1777, when Commodore Hopkins wrote to him with difficulties of prize distribution and enclosing a plan designed by ABRAHAM WHIPPLE and Thomas Mumford. [NRAR, 36] On 23 April 1777 the Marine Committee sent Hinman orders for a cruise in the Atlantic, to return to Boston by 1 July 1777 to receive fresh orders. [NRAR, 43]

On 9 March 1778 the Raleigh and the Alfred, at 16°31'N, 55°40'W, met HM Frigate Ariadne (Captain Thomas Pringle) and HM Sloop Ceres. Although superior in force to the two British vessels Thompson mishandled the Raleigh and ran away. The Alfred fought for about ten minutes before surrendering. [Allen, i, 301-303]

The crew was taken to Barbados. The officers were transferred there to HMS Yarmouth (Captain Thompson), where they doubt heard of the shocking loss of the Continental Navy Ship Randolph (Captain NICHOLAS BIDDLE). [Smith, 167] One officer, Second Lieutenant of Marines NATHANIEL RICHARDS, was released at Barbadoes, on the intercession of both the English Captain Thompson and of Hinman. Hinman wanted him to go to America and inform the Navy Board of the Eastern Department of Thompson's behavior. [Smith, 167] From there they were transported to England. [Smith, 167] Hinman was brought before a Scotch judge for examination at Gosport, where he alledgedly won over the judge with his Yankee humour. [Morgan, Captains, 126] He was imprisoned at Forton Prison on 18 July 1778. [Smith, 167] Hinman was only in prison a short time, escaping on 23 July, [NOAR, 152] with several of his officers. [Allen, ii, 650] He left some money for his officers, bribed a guard with ten guineas, and walked out of jail at night. He walked in rain for ten miles, found a lodging place near London, and contacted people who helped him get to France three weeks later. [Morgan, Captains, 126] Hinman took passage home from France in Continental Navy Ship Providence (Captain ABRAHAM WHIPPLE).  [Morgan, Captains, 155]  Meanwhile, the surgeon of the Alfred had called on the Navy Board of the Eastern Department before 29 April 1778 and enlightened the board as to Thompson's behavior. [Allen, i, 313]

The Marine Committee heard of the loss of the Alfred with distaste. On 28 April 1778 the Marine Committee notified Massachusetts Continental Agent John Bradford, noting that the loss was to be inquired into, along with Thompson's conduct.[NRAR, 71] On 8 May 1778 the Marine Committee ordered the Navy Board of the Eastern District to suspend Thompson from command pending a court of inquiry. [NRAR, 72] Thompson was duly tried and cashiered from the Navy.

Hinman ever believed that Thompson had deserted him. [Morgan, Captains, 124] When Hinman boarded Ariadne after the battle he was introduced to Captain Thomas Pringle. Referring to Thompson the British captain asked who "that damnd rascal was who ran away?" Hinman replied "Sir, he is your countryman." Pringle answered that "He is a rascal, come from where he may." Hinman then added: "Had I his ship, I would have taken you, Sir." Pringle thought that was boasting: "That is loud talking, Capr Hinman." Hinman stated the force of the Raleigh and asked Pringle if he, Pringle, commanded such a ship did he not think he could have captured the two British vessels. Pringle thought he could have, to which Hinman added, "I think I could do as much as you." Pringle concluded "I believe you can." [Morgan, Captains, 125]

Hinman's court-martial for loss of the Alfred was convened on 12 February 1779, aboard Continental Navy Ship Providence, at Boston. Captain Abraham Whipple presided. The charges were preferred by Thomas Thompson, who had already been cashiered out of the Navy for his behavior in command of the Raleigh. Thompson charged Hinman with disobediance of orders, neglect of duty, and unprecedented conduct. The court "duly and maturely" considered the evidence and "fully and clearly" decided that Hinman was not guilty of any charges. [Morgan, Captains, 154] Hinman was acquitted with "the highest honor," the court "approving the whole of his conduct on the 9th of March 1778, he having behaved himself according to the strictest rules of naval discipline and agreeable in all respects to the 27th Article of the Rules and Regulations of the Continental Navy." [Morgan, Captains, 155] The decision was published in the Boston papers on 18 February 1779. [Morgan, Captains, 246n14] Thompson publicly attacked the court's decision in the press. He pointed out irregularities in the trial and noted that Hinman had come home from France in the Providence, commanded by Whipple. The majority of the court's members had thus heard Hinman's account numerous times "and they must be prejudiced in his Favour, by hearing his account of the matter to often on the passage." On 18 March 1779 Thompson had the dissenting opinion of Captain Henry Johnson, who believed Hinman was clearly guilty, printed in the papers. [Morgan, Captains, 155, 246n15]

After being cleared of the charges against him, Hinman had care of the incomplete Trumbull in the summer of 1779. He placed a number of water filled casks along her sides, held in place by ropes passing under the keel. When these were pumped out the frigate was raised enough to allow her to pass over the bar at the mouth of the Connecticut River. She was taken to New London and began fitting out for sea. [Allen, ii, 498] After her command was given to JAMES NICHOLSON, he turned to privateering.  On 6 October 1779 the Marine Committee notified the Eastern Navy Board as to reasons for Nicholson's appointment to Trumbull and Hinman's non-selection. [NRAR, 119] On 26 October 1779 the Marine Committee sent Hinman an extract of its minutes, approving the sentence of his court-martial. [NRAR, 121] He commanded the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Hancock in late 1779, capturing sloop Gamecock, schooner Mulberry, brig Bellona, and sloop Lady Erskine. [NOAR, 152] Hinman was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Ship Deane on 6 June 1780, owned by Thomas Mumford & Co. Hinman listed as address as New London. Deane was a huge privateer, thirty guns and 210 men. [NRAR, 263] Two British vessels were captured by the Deane. [NOAR, 152] Hinman was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Brigantine Marquis de La Fayette on 13 June 1781, a vessel owned by Thomas Mumford & Co. of Norwich. Hinman listed his address as Stonington. [NRAR, 384] He died at Stonington in 1805. [NOAR, 152]


HOBART, JOHN SLOSS

NY

Member, New York Committee of Safety


John Sloss Hobart was amember of the New York Committee of Safety in August 1776, and presumably of the New York Provincial Congress. [NDAR, 6, 322-323] He served on a committee to determine whether or not to sell the New York Navy Sloop Montgomery in September 1776. [NDAR, 6, 885] He was at Fairfield, Connecticut on 8 October 1776, from where he reported to the Committee of Safety on the status of the Montgomery. [NDAR, 6, 1290-1292]


HODGE, JOHN


NY (P/A)

Captain, Continental Navy


John Hodge, a native of New York, was born in 1732. [NOAR, 153]  He was commissioned as a Captain in the Continental Navy on 22 August 1776 and assigned to the Continental Navy Ship Montgomery, then under construction at Poughkeepsie, New York. Hodge replaced THOMAS GRENNELL, who was transferred to sister ship Congress. [NDAR, VI, 270-271] On 10 October 1776, when Congress ranked its naval captains, Hodge was ranked fourteenth, the most junior of the new frigate captains. [NDAR, VI, 1200-1201] On 18 October the Marine Committee more or less turned the direction of the New York ships over to the New York Convention, [NDAR, VI, 1353-1354] with whom the captains were to consult when officers were selected. [NDAR, VI, 1354] Montgomery was launched on 4 November 1776 [NDAR, VII, 47-48] and was moved to Esopus Creek [Kingston], New York on 12 December 1776 [NDAR, VII, 460] to winter there. As part of a new Hudson Highlands defense scheme the Congress and Montgomery were ordered to be completed and stationed at Fort Montgomery, behind and to support the river chain, in May 1777. [NDAR, VIII, 987 and note] Grennell and Hodge now appointed several sea and Marine officers for their ships. The frigates were at Poughkeepsie in early June 1777, where they were being rigged. [NDAR, IX, 82] Crews were provided from the garrison at Fort Montgomery on 15 June. [NDAR, IX, 118] Montgomery arrived at Fort Montgomery about 16 June 1777. [NDAR, IX, 118] On 26 June the Marine Committee ordered Grennell and Hodge to fit out their ships and place themselves under the generals in charge of the Hudson defenses. Blank commissions for their officers had been sent to the New York Council of Safety. [NDAR, IX, 176-177]  On 7 July Hodge's Second Lieutenant, ABRAHAM LEWIS, was seconded to command the galley Lady Washington, [NDAR, IX, 232] and soon after his First Lieutenant, ROBERT CASTLE, was seconded to the New York Navy Sloop Camden. [NDAR, IX, 281 and note] Grennell was absent from the naval force at the fort on 13 July, when Hodge was in command. [NDAR, IX, 281 and note]. Hodge managed to get himself into a dispute over command on board the ship with the Army, which was furnishing the crew. [NDAR, IX, 259-260 and 260 note, 260, 277] Soon after he received the Marine Committee letter of 26 June. A dispute between Grennell and Hodge on the one hand and the New York Council of Safety on the other, over the appointment of officers, now developed. [NDAR, IX, 286 and note, 294, 300] Hodge also had the problem of desertion: his Captain of Marines advertised for a deserter in September and October 1777. [Smith, 385] Hodge was with his ship on 7 October 1777, when the British captured the Hudson River forts. A contrary wind prevented the frigates escaping and they were burned to prevent capture. Hodge continued in the Navy. On 25 May 1782 Hodge is ordered by Robert Morris, as Agent of Marine, to put himself under Captain John Barry's orders (Hodge in the Active). [NRAR, 190]


HODGKINSON, PETER

PA

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


Peter Hodgkinson, listing his age as 25, [NOAR, 153] was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Brigantine Virginia on 18 June 1781. [NRAR, 488] Hodgkinson and Virginia were captured by the British vessel New Adventure about March 1783. [NOAR, 153]


HOGKINS, THOMAS

MA

Prize Master, Massachusetts Privateers


Thomas Hogkins was listed as a prize master on the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Pilgrim (Commander JOSEPH ROBINSON) on 14 August 1780.[Howe, Beverly Privateers, 414]


HOLLESTER, GILES

CT

Midshipman, Connecticut Navy


Giles Hollester was aboard the Connecticut Navy Ship Oliver Cromwell as a Midshipman on 25 February 1777, according to the crew list. [NDAR, 7, 1283-1287]


HOLLINGSWORTH, JESSE

MD

Owner, Maryland Privateers


Jesse Hollingsworth was a resident of Baltimore, Maryland. He was associated in privateering with JOHN STERRETT, BENJAMIN CROCKETT, ROBERT T. HOOE, and JEREMIAH YELLOTT. Vessels associated with Hollingsworth were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

9/14/78

MD

Sloop Rutledge (4/10)

John Earle

Benjamin Cockett, Jesse Hollingsworth, Robert T. Hooe

John Earle, Isaac Van Bibber

William Hyde [NRAR]

7/19/79

MD

Schooner Felicity (6/25)

Jeremiah Yellott

Jesse Hollingsworth et al

Jeremiah Yellott, Charles Wallace

William Hyde [NRAR, 292]

8/17/80

MD

Schooner Antelope (14/40)

Jeremiah Yellott

John Sterrett, Jesse Hollingsworth et al

Jeremiah Yellott, Charles Wallace

William Hyde [NRAR, 227]

8/17/80

MD

Schooner Felicity (10/25)

Frederick Folger

John Sterett, Jesse Hollingsworth et al

Frederick Folger, Charles Wallace

William Hyde [NRAR, 292]

11/17/81

PA

Schooner Felicity (8/20)

Peter Wing

Jeremiah Yellott, John Sterett, Jesse Hollingsworth

Levi Hollingsworth, David Sterett, Peter Wing

James Trimble, Josiah Siddons [NRAR, 292]


HOLLOWAY, ICHABOD

RI

Prize Master, Rhode Island Privateers


Ichabod Holloway was aboard the Rhode Island Privateer Ship Marlborough (Commander GEORGE WAIT BABCOCK) in December 1777. He participated in her first cruise, from December 1777 to June 1778, along the African coast. During the cruise, two small actions were fought and many prizes were captured.[see Marlborough for references]


HOLMES, ALEXANDER

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Alexander Holmes was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Batchelor on 2 November 1779. [see Batchelor]


HOLT, SAMUEL


(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


HOLTON, WILLIAM

(P)

Captain, Continental Marines


HOOE, ROBERT T.

VA

Agent, Maryland Navy

Owner, Maryland Privateers


Robert T. Hooe of Alexandria, Virginia, was a business partner of DANIEL OF ST. THOMAS JENIFER. The partnership served as an Agent for the Maryland Navy. Hooe also was among the owners of the Maryland privateer sloop Baltimore Hero. Associated with Hooe in privateering were BENJAMIN and JOHN CROCKETT, ABRAHAM VAN BIBBER, JOHN STERETT, and THOMAS RINGGOLD. Vessels associated with Hooe were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

9/16/76

MD

Sloop Baltimore Hero (6/24)

Thomas Waters

Abraham Van Bibber, John Crockett, Thomas Ringgold, Robert T. Hooe

Thomas Waters, John Crockett, Thomas Ringgold, Robert T. Hooe

[NRAR, 391]


HOOKE [HOOK], THOMAS

PA

Commander, South Carolina Privateers

Commander, Virginia Privateers


Thomas Hooke [Hook] was in command of the South Carolina Privateer Schooner Sally in 1777. [Coker, 300; here listed as Hook] On  20 June 178, Thomas Hooke, listing his address as Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was commissioned to the Virginia Privateer Schooner Tammany (also called the Good Intent). [NRAR, 472]


HOOPER, JOHN

MA

Second Lieutenant, Massachusetts Navy

First Lieutenant, Massachusetts Privateers


John Hooper was born in 1752 [NOAR, 155] and was a resident of Marblehead, Massachusetts. He served as a Second Lieutenant aboard the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner True Blue (Commander WILLIAM COLE) on 29 August 1776. Hooper was in the Massachusetts Navy, assigned as Second Lieutenant on the Massachusetts Navy Brigantine Freedom (Captain JOHN CLOUSTON) on 19 February 1777. On 12 September 1778 he was First Lieutenant aboard the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Pilgrim (Commander HUGH HILL). [Howe, Beverly Privateers, 429] He died in 1810. [NOAR, 155]


HOPES, ROBERT

First Lieutenant of Marines, Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron


Robert Hopes was a native of York, Pennsylvania. He had enlisted as an ensign in the 6th Pennsylvania on 9 January 1776 and had served in the northern campaign. Hopes was wounded at Trois Rivieres, "where he behaved with the utmost bravery." He was recommended to Arnold for a First Lieutenant of Marines aboard the Continental Army Schooner Royal Savage (Commodore JACOBUS WYNKOOP) some time before 21 July 1776. Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Hartley recommended him to Gates on that date, and asked that his twenty-five Marines be sent up to Crown Point, as the Royal Savage was ready. Hopes, however, declined the appointment on 21 July. He was replaced by JAMES CALDERWOOD. [Smith, Marines in the Revolution, 28]


HOPKINS, CALEB

MA

[Owner], Massachusetts Privateers


Caleb Hopkins was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. Hopkins was associated in privateering with SILAS ATKINS and SILAS ATKINS, JR. Vessels associated with Hopkins were:

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

8/12/77

MA

Schooner Bunker Hill (6/35)

Moses Lewis

Silas Atkins et al

Moses Lewis, Silas Atkins, Jr., Caleb Hopkins

Benjamin Hammatt Jr., James Hughes [Allen, MPR, 89]


HOPKINS, CHRISTOPHER

(A)

Lieutenant, Continental Navy


HOPKINS, ESEK


(P)

Commander-in-Chief, Continental Navy

[Commodore; Admiral]


HOPKINS, ESEK JR.

(A)

Lieutenant, Continental Navy


HOPKINS, JOHN BURROUGHS [BURROWS]

RI (P/A)

Captain, Continental Navy

Commander, Rhode Island Privateers


On 4 April 1777 the Marine Committee wrote to Hopkins, urging him to get to sea quickly with Warren and instructing him to cooperate with the Council of War at Providence. [NRAR, 42] On 4 May 1779 the Marine Committee wrote to Hopkins, congratulating him on the success of the cruise of his squadron (Warren, Queen of France, Ranger). [NRAR, 105] On 20 May 1779 the Marine Committee notified the Eastern Navy Board to hold a court of inquiry on Hopkins and Captain JOSEPH OLNEY. If necessary a court martial was to be held. The Marine Committee enclosed instructions. If these men were suspended, DUDLEY SALTONSTALL and JOHN P. RATHBUN were to replace them. [NRAR, 106] On 26 May 1779 the Marine Committee notified the Eastern Navy Board that it approved the suspension of Hopkins. [NRAR, 107] On 21 June 1779 the Marine Committee wrote to the Eastern Navy Board concerning the conduct of Hopkins. [NRAR, 109] On 25 January 1780 the Board of Admiralty wrote to John Murray at Providence, concerning Hopkins' case. [NRAR, 132] Hopkins was commissioned to the Rhode Island Privateer Sloop Success on 24 April 1781, the vessel being owned by various interests in Rhode Island including Clark & Nightingale. [NRAR, 466]


HOPKINS, MICHAEL

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Michael Hopkins was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. [NOAR, 156] He was aboard the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Buckram (Commander JOHN CROSS) as First Lieutenant on 21 August 1777. [NRAR, 243; Allen, MPR, 89; NDAR, X, 347-349] Buckram sailed about mid-September. [Allen, MPR, 89] On 16 September 1777 she was captured by HM Frigate Diamond. [NDAR,  IX, 931 and note] She was sent to Halifax on 22 September 1777. [NDAR, IX, 950] Hopkins went to Halifax jail on 25 October 1777. [NDAR, X, 347-349] Hopkins was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Elizabeth on 15 August 1780. [NOAR, 156]


HOPKINS, THOMAS

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Thomas Hopkins was born about 1751. In 1782 he listed his residence as Middletown, Connecticut. He was described as 5'4" tall, with gray eyes, dark short hair, a light complexion and a slender build on his commission description. He listed his age as 31. Hopkins was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Hermione (sometimes called the Harmony) on 14 August 1782. He sailed soon after for the West Indies. In the passage he met the British Brigantine Cumberland on 10 September 1782 and had a sharp fight with her before taking her prize. The sloop Adventure was also captured on 29 September. On his return from the West Indies, Hopkins was driven ashore to the east of New London, Connecticut, and the Hermione was lost. [Middlebrook, MCR, II, 119-120]


HOPKINS, WILLIAM

(A)

Lieutenant, Continental Navy


HORE, THOMAS

Surgeon, Continental Navy


Killed in action 7 March 1778, on the Randolph.


HORTON, FRANCIS

MA

Prize Master, Massachusetts Privateers


Francis Horton was listed as a prize master on the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Pilgrim (Commander JOSEPH ROBINSON) on 14 August 1780.[Howe, Beverly Privateers, 414]


HOWELL, SILAS

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Silas Howell was a resident of Manchester, Massachusetts. On 3 September 1777 he was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Warren. [NOAR, 158] She fitted out at Cape Ann, Massachusetts with a listed battery of ten guns and a crew of fifty men. Warren sailed on her first and last cruise about 8 September 1777. She came out of Gloucester, got through the British blockade and was about 140 miles southeast of Nantucket Shoals by the morning of 9 September: a squally grey day. At 0700 little Warren was sighted by HM Frigate Unicorn, away to the east, and a pursuit was begun. By 1000 the British frigate had come with musket shot and began firing her bowchasers and then small arms at the privateer. Howell hove to and surrendered. The prisoners were soon aboard the Unicorn and a midshipman and eight sailors boarded the Warren as a prize crew. She was sent in to New York, where she was condemned on 3 November 1777. [NDAR, IX, 901 and note] On 11 May 1780 Howell was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Decoy. [NOAR, 158]


HOUSE, GEORGE

CT (A)

Lieutenant, Continental Navy

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


George House was a resident of New London, Connecticut. About January 1780 he was in command of the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Eagle. On 22 January 1780 he captured a notorious Tory raider, Joseph Hoit, in Long Island Sound. In mid-1780 Eagle was in Continental Navy service as a dispatch vessel. [Middlebrook, II, 74] On 21 July 1780, the Board of Admiralty, in a letter concerning naval stores at Newbern, North Carolina, informed Richard Ellis that the stores were to be sent to Philadelphia in the Eagle, under command of Lieutenant House. [NRAR, 152] About September 1780 Eagle resumed her privateering career. House captured the schooner Penguin on 5 December 1780. Eagle was captured by the British on 26 April 1781 and taken into New York. [Middlebrook, II, 74] House was exchanged in May 1781. [NOAR, 156-157] House was then appointed to command the Connecticut Privateer Galley Rainbow on 2 July 1781, owned by Jonathan Brewster & Co. of [New London]. [NRAR, 426] House next moved to the Connecticut Privateer Brigantine Dandy, on 16 October 1781. This vessel was owned by one Clerkson & Co., but had association with John Deshon and Nathaniel Shaw. [NRAR, 262] On 10 June 1782 he was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Galley Enterprize, owned by John Deshon & Co. of New London. [NRAR, 283] On 1 February 1783 he captured the sloop Little Dick. [NOAR, 156-157]


HOUSTON [HUSTON], PETER

MD

Commander, Maryland Privateers


Peter Houston [NRAR, 360] [Huston], a resident of Baltimore, Maryland, [NOAR, 157] was commissioned, on 30 March 1779, as First Lieutenant on the Maryland Privateer Sloop Fly (Commander ALEXANDER CAIN). [NOAR, 157] He was commissioned, as Commander,  to the Maryland Privateer Schooner Johnson on 14 August 1779. [NRAR, 360]


HOWLAND, CONSIDER

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Consider Howland was appointed as First Lieutenant on the Massachusetts Privateer Sloop America (Commander WILLIAM COIT), commissioned on 22 September 1777. [NDAR, IX, 944 and note] Before Howland could go privateering he had to be exchanged: he was still on parole, having been released from prison in early 1777. The Commissary of Prisoners was asked to forward his exchange on 16 September. [NDAR, IX, 933-934 and 934 note] On 5 June 1780 he was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Phoenix. [NOAR, 158]


HOWLAND, JOSEPH

CT

Owner, Connecticut Privateers


Joseph Howland was a resident of Norwich, Connecticut. As Howland & Coit he was involved with THOMAS COIT in a number of privateers.

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

7/3/82

CT

Brigantine Thetis (6/20)

William Wattles

Howland & Coit

William Wattles, Joseph Howland, Thomas Coit

[NRAR, 391]

9/16/82

CT

Brigantine Thomas (6/20)

Elisha Lathrop, Jr.

Howland, Coit & Co.

Elisha Lathrop, Jr., Hezekiah Perkins, John Alden

[NRAR, 474]


HUDDLE, BENJAMIN

(A)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


HUDDLE, WILLIAM

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


HUDSON, JOSEPH

MA

Prize Master, Massachusetts Privateers


Joseph Hudson was listed as a prize master on the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Pilgrim (Commander JOSEPH ROBINSON) on 14 August 1780.[Howe, Beverly Privateers, 414]


HUGHES, SAMUEL

MD

Owner, Maryland Privateers


Samuel Hughes was a resident of Baltimore, Maryland. He was associated with the following vessels:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

6/8/78

MD

Schooner Baltimore (0/6)

John Fanning

Samuel Hughes et al

John Fanning, Samuel Hughes

[NRAR, 231]


HUME, ROBERT

[PA] (A)

Lieutenant, Continental Navy

First Mate [Lieutenant], Pennsylvania Privateers


Robert Hume served aboard the Pennsylvania Privateer Brigantine McClenachan (Commander Thomas Houston) as First Mate [Lieutenant], from 16 July 1781. Hume is shown with a Philadelphia address. [NRAR, 381]


HUMPHREYS, RICHARD

Owner, Pennsylvania Privateers


Richard Humphreys, of Philadelphia, is listed with ROBERT DUNCAN as an owner of the Pennsylvania Privateer Brig Argo, commissioned 18 March 1780. The details:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

3/18/80

PA

Brig Argo (14/60)

John Ridge

Robert Duncan, Richard Humphretys & Co.

Robert Duncan, Richard Humphreys

James Trimble [NRAR, 229]


HUNTER, ROBERT

(P)

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


HUNTINGTON, ANDREW

CT

Owner, Connecticut Privateers


Andrew Huntington was a resident of Norwich, Connecticut. Vessels associated with Huntington were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

10/5/76

CT

Sloop Nancy (6/15)

William Wattles

Jabez Perkins, Andrew Hutington

William Wattles, Jabez Perkins, Andrew Huntington

[NRAR, 398; NDAR, X, 589-590]

3/20/77

CT

Sloop Trumbull (10/50)

Henry Billings

Andrew Hutington, Ebenezer Hutington, [Nathaniel Shaw]

Henry Billings, Andrew Hutington, Ebenezer Hutington

[NRAR, 478]


HUNTINGTON, EBENEZER

CT

Owner, Connecticut Privateers


Ebenezer Huntington was a resident of Norwich, Connecticut. Vessels associated with Huntington were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

3/20/77

CT

Sloop Trumbull (10/50)

Henry Billings

Andrew Hutington, Ebenezer Hutington, [Nathaniel Shaw]

Henry Billings, Andrew Hutington, Ebenezer Hutington

[NRAR, 478]


HURD, JOSEPH

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Joseph Hurd may have been a resident of Chatham [NOAR, 161] or East Haddam, Connecticut. He was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Harlequin on 1 September 1779.  Harlequin was captured by the British on 19 October 1779, and she was sent into New York. [Middlebrook, Maritime Connecticut During The Revolution, II, 112-113]


HUTCHINSON, GODFREY

MA

Commercial Agent, Massachusetts


Godfrey and William Hutchinson were the Commercial Agents for Massachusetts at St. Pierre, Martinique. A report to the Massachusetts Board of War on 31 March 1778 detailed various expenditures for the Massachusetts Navy Brigs Hazard (Captain SIMEON SAMSON) and Tyyrannicide (Captain JONATHAN HARADEN). At that time the state owed the Hutchinsons 33,431.14.4 livre tournois. [NDAR, XI, 654-855 and 855 notes]


HUTCHINSON, WILLIAM

MA

Commercial Agent, Massachusetts

[See GODFREY HUTCHINSON]


HUSTON, PETER

[See PETER HOUSTON]


HYAM, RICHARD

First Lieutenant, Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron


Richard Hyam was First Lieutenant and commanding officer of the Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron Schooner Revenge, on 26 June 1777, at Fort Ticonderoga. [NDAR, 9, 174] During the British attack on Fort Ticonderoga on 5 July the Revenge assisted in escorting a convoy to Skenesborough. She was burned and blown up there on 6 July 1776. [NDAR, 9, 225]

HYLER, ADAM

NJ

Commander, New Jersey Privateers


Adam Hyler was a resident of New Jersey and a noted maritime guerilla leader late in the war. He was commissioned to the New Jersey Privateer Boat Active about 26 June 1782. [McManemin, Privateers, 474-475]

Revised 23 August 2014 © awiatsea.com