D




DALE, RICHARD
VA

First Mate, Continental Navy

Richard Dale entered the Continental Navy Brig Lexington (Captain JOHN BARRY) on 27 July 1776 as a Midshipman. [NDAR, IX, 502-507] He was First Mate when lexington sailed for France (under HENRY JOHNSON) on 26 February 1777, from Baltimore. Two prizes were captured en route. Lexington arrived at Nantes, France on 3 April 1777. Dale was aboard Lexington during her participation in the cruise of Captain LAMBERT WICKES' squadron around Ireland, 28 May 1777-27 June 1777. In September 1777 Lexington sailed for America. On 19 September she was captured by HM Cutter Alert (Lieutenant John Bazely). [NDAR, IX, 657] He was sent to Mill Prison in September. On 30 September Dale was a witness giving a deposition for Lexington's trial. [NDAR, IX, 669-671 and 671 note]


DALLING, THOMAS
MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers

Thomas Dalling was a resident of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. He was commissioned to the New Hampshire Privateer Schooner McClary on 17 May 1777. [NRAR, 381] McClary was described at this time as a "Topsail Schooner" with eight guns in a report filed by a British spy. She sailed from Portsmouth on 22 May 1777, supposedly bound for the English Channel or the Portuguese coast. [NDAR, VIII, 1016-1017] McClary was thus at sea in June and July 1777. Dalling again went out to the area around the Newfoundland Banks. Dalling spoke with Massachusetts Privateer Active (Andrew Gardner) and Speedwell (Jonathan Greely), part of the force that broke out with Commodore John Manley, at 43°04'N, 45°30'W (London longitude). [NDAR, IX, 298] At least three prizes were captured on this cruise: Brigantine Jane (John Decaen), an 80-ton vessel, and brigantine Two Sisters (William Waterman), 50 tons, arrived in Portsmouth [NDAR, IX, 206-207]; Brigantine Thetis (John Russel [Russell]), 50 tons, with a cargo of green fish and salt, arrived in Portsmouth on 7 July 1777. [NDAR, IX, 231, 255] On 13 September 1777 Dalling was commissioned to the New Hampshire Privateer Brigantine General Sullivan. [NRAR, 314] Dalling captured the ship Caledonia on 15 July 1778. [NOAR, 82] He also captured the eight gun British ship Mary [Maclay, 216] Dalling was subsequently commissioned to the New Hampshire Privateer Brigantine Chaste Susanna on 12 June 1780. [NOAR, 82] In 1782 he commanded the General Sullivan again, and recaptured the ship Harriet (Harriot). [Maclay, 215-216; NOAR, 82]


DALTON, TRISTRAM
MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Tristram Dalton was a merchant and resident of Newburyport, Massachusetts. He was associated in privateering with many other local merchants. Vessels associated with Dalton were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

7/17/77

MA

Brigantine Fair Play (12/60)

Isaac Somes

Tristram Dalton

Isaac Somes, John Coulston, Zebulon Giddings

Ebenezer Thompson, Nicholas Gilman [NRAR, 287]

2/1/81

MA

Sloop Betsey (10/40)

Benjamin Lurvy

Tristram Dalton

Benjamin Lurvy, Tristram Dalton, Silvanus Loell

Joseph Coffin, George Baker [NRAR, 236]

3/19/81

MA

Schooner Fortune (8/30)

Joshua Burges

Tristram Dalton et al

Joshua Burges, Nehemiah Somes, Gustavus Fellows

Samuel Deming, Nicholas Bowe [NRAR, 298]

4/30/81

MA

Brigantine Little Porga (10/60)

William Armstrong

Tristram Dalton

William Armstrong, Tristram Dalton, Robert Hooper

Joseph Putnam, Joseph Coffin [NRAR, 375]

10/29/81

MA

Brigantine Antelope (10/19)

Thomas Clouston

Tristram Dalton

Thomas Clouston, Tristram Dalton, Robert C. Hooper

Richard Titcomb, Joshua Prentiss [NRAR, 228]

2/6/82

MA

Ship Antelope (8/16)

Edward Fettyplace

Tristram Dalton

Edward Fettyplace, Stephen Bruce, Nehemiah Somes

William Payne, John Fairservice [NRAR, 228]

As witness:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

2/8/81

MA

Brigantine Hazard (6/14)

Enoch Coffin

John Pettingal et al

Enoch Coffin, Anthony Davenport, Joseph Moulton, Jr.

Tristram Dalton, David Cutler [NRAR, 330]


DANA, FRANCIS
MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Francis Dana was a resident of Cambridge, Massachusetts. When a prize to Massachusetts Privateer Sloop Lady Washington (Commander Ishmael Hardy) was brought in, Dana appeared in the Maritime Court on 21 March, on behalf of Hardy. [Allen, MPR, 200, from the Boston Gazette of 7 April 1777] Vessels associated with Dana were:

As presumptive owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

[12/15]/76

MA

Sloop Lady Washington

Ishmael Hardy

[Francis Dana]

 

Allen, MPR, 200]









DANIEL,

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Daniel commanded Connecticut Privateer Sloop Volante, at sea in June 1778. She captured the sloop Ranger in that month. [Maclay, 116]


D’ARBOUSIER

Owner, [Continental] Privateers


This man was a merchant residing at Point-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe, French West Indies. He owned a part interest in a privateer (presumably with a WILLIAM BINGHAM commission). This privateer sloop (Plangue) captured the British Transport Brigantine Rainbow (Gordon) Gordon reported to Governor William Burt of Antigua, that her crew consisted of “French Men, Negroes and Mulattoes . . .” The prize was sent into Port Louis, Saint-Domingue on 25 October 1777. The commandant there, Gilbert du Lion, ordered her out of port, but the privateer captain requested water and wood. Du Lion placed guards on the prize to prevent unlawful sales ashore. Du Lion, in a letter to Comte D’Arbaud, requested leave to allow the sale of the cargo, which would be a “godsend” to Port Louis. Governor Burt had heard the news by 31 October, when he addressed a letter to Comte d’Arbaud requesting restoration of the vessel.On 3 November d’Arbaud ordered the vessel and cargo restored to Gordon. He also ordered Plangue and Gilles, the lieutenant of the privateer arrested and brought to his headquarters.A copy of these orders was given to Gordon. [NDAR, X, 313 and note, 366 and note, 391] When Burt complained about d’Arbousier and Soubies (the other owner) D’Arbaud stated that his examination of them was useless. [NDAR, X, 430-432] A more extensive complaint on 8 November 1777 [NDAR, X, 437-439] D’Arbaud replied, on 17 November, that d’Arbousier was innocent. [NDAR, 525-527]

As presumptive owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

10/?/77

 

Sloop [unknown]

Plangue

[d’Arbousier and Soubies]

 

[see above]


DARBOUSSIER

[See D’ARBOUSIER]


DARRELL, JOSIAH

SC

Commander, South Carolina Privateers


Josiah Darrell was in command of the South Carolina Privateer Brig Polly in 1777. He was replaced by HEZEKIAH ANTHONY. [Coker, 300]


DAVIS,


MA

Prize Master, Massachusetts Privateers


When Massachusetts Privateer Brig Yankee Hero (Commander JAMES TRACY) sailed from Newburyport, Massachusetts on 6 June 1776, one Davis was serving aboard as Prize Master. During the subsequent battle with HM Frigate Milford he was wounded, and captured with the brig. [NDAR, VI, 126-128; 778-780]


DAVIDSON, SAMUEL

PA

Commodore, Pennsylvania Navy


Samuel Davidson was appointed captain of the Pennsylvania Navy Galley Warren on 21 September 1775 [NDAR, II, 180]. On 2 October 1775 he received his commission, #10, dated 21 September. [NDAR, II, 272-273] Davidson signed the memorial of the galley captains requesting a pay raise and the adding of a second lieutenant to the galley crews on 12 October 1775. [NDAR, II, 429] On 30 October Davidson signed a memorial by the galley captains protesting the appointment of a commodore who was not a galley commander. [NDAR, II, 654-655] On 28 November 1775 the Pennsylvania Committee of Safety gave Davidson leave of absence to make a “powder voyage” for the Continental Congress. [NDAR, II, 1183-1184] By 10 December 1775 Davidson was skipper of the Peggy [NDAR, III, 38-39 and 39 note] He was taken and arrived at Antigua on 14 January 1776. [NDAR, III, 305-306 and 306 note] He took command of the Pennsylvania Navy Floating Battery  Arnold on 9 March 1776 [Jackson, 334] and was in command by 14 March 1776. [NDAR, III, 338 and note] Davidson was appointed Commodore on 15 June 1776; relieved as Commodore on 27 August 1776 because of opposition from the galley captains and given command of Montgomery and floating battery Arnold. Resigned about 1 October 1776. [Jackson, 334]


DAVIS,

Captain, Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron


Davis was at Fort Ticonderoga on 18 August 1776, in command of the Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron Galley Lee. His vessel was not yet rigged. [NDAR, 6, 224]


DAVIS, ROBERT

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


The British brig, Diligent, 12 guns, was captured on 7 May 1779 by the sloop Providence off Sandy Hook. Lieutenant of Marines John Chilton was killed in the engagement. Providence put into New Bedford, Massachusetts for repairs, and Lieutenant Chilton’s place was taken by Robert Davis. One Robert Davis, of Massachusetts, had been a second lieutenant in the 15th Continental Infantry on 1 January 1776. He was promoted to first lieutenant of the 1st Massachusetts Infantry on 1 January 1777 and to captain on 4 November 1777. He resigned his commission 1 April 1779. He may have been the same Robert Davis “of the continental army” whom Sergeant Thomas Philbrook of sloop Providence wrote of in 1832. Davis landed from Providence with 30 Marines on Banks lsland in Penobscot Bay at sunset, 11 August 1779. Davis’s further career as a Continental Marine officer is uncertain. However, on 5 January 1780, one Robert Davis was identified as a “Volunteer Officer” of frigate Providence. With Midshipmen Thomas Bowen and Henry Young, and Samuel Hacker, another volunteer, he was granted parole from New Providence, British Bahama Islands, hy Governor Montfort Browne. It was asserted that they had been taken in the frigate Providence, but the frigate had lost no men in battle and was, in fact, not captured until the fall of Charleston, South Carolina on 12 May 1 780. She had sailed from Nantasket Roads on 23 November 1779, bound for Charleston, On 5 December she captured the privateer brig Dolphin, manned her with a prize crew, and sent her into Charleston. One can only assume that Davis and his companions were members of the prize crew of Dolphin, which was perhaps recaptured by the British and carried into New Providence. [Smith, Marines, 438]


DAWSON, CHARLES

SC

Commander, South Carolina Privateers


Charles Dawson was in command of the South Carolina Privateer Brig Medley at an unknown date. [Coker, 300]


DAY, PETER

PA

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


Peter Day was commissioned to the Pennsylvania Privateer Brig Active on 20 September 1779. Active was at sea in about October 1779 when she fell in with the British Privateer Schooner Mercury (George Campbell), armed with eight guns and sailing out of New York. A short action followed in which Mercury had four men wounded, including Campbell, before surrendering. On the same cruise, Active captured the brigantine Providence (John Munro). Somewhat later, perhaps on another cruise, Active captured the ship Needham (M’Meakin), bound from Jamaica, British West Indies to New York, New York. [see Active]


DAYTON, HENRY

Lieutenant, Continental Marines


Henry Dayton was probably from Newport, Rhode Island. The date of his commission as a lieutenant of Marines is in doubt. Perhaps it is permissible to deduce that he may have joined John Trevett, also of Newport, when the latter “sailed from Providence in a stoop called the Catea [Katy], commanded by Abram Whipple, Esq., of Providence, with a number of passengers, to sail with a fleet of armed vessels fixing at Philadelphia in the month of Nov. 1775.” Trevett, however, was commissioned first lieutenant of Marines in the Continental Navy Ship Columbus (Captain ABRAHAM WHIPPLE) for the New Providence expedition, and Dayton was first lieutenant of Marines in the Continental Navy Sloop Providence (Captain JOHN HAZARD), the former Katy. Trevett, in describing his experiences ashore at New Providence, twice identified Dayton as “Captain,” who was commanding one company of Marines. It is fairly obvious that his journal was written after the fact, for Captain Samuel Nicholas is also referred to therein as “Major.” Trevett contended that he and “Captain” Dayton, acting on their own volition, took Governor Montfort Browne prisoner at Nassau. Following the return of the fleet to Providence, Lieutenant Dayton served on two courts martial. The first was that of Captain Ahraham Whipple on 6 May 1776, and the other, on 8 May, for the trial of Captain John Hazard. Although the service of Lieutenant Dayton following the expedition is relatively unknown, Lieutenant Trevett is known to have been on board Providence from 21 October 1776 through February 1777. On 7 January 1777, Commodore Esek Hopkins ordered the payment of 30 pounds and 13 shillings to Lieutenant Dayton as prize money. Trevett’s journal, dated January 1777, gives some detail of an expedition by the crew of the Providence to destroy the British frigate Diamond aground at Warwick Neck. It was a failure, but he wrote that at the time “Com. Hopkins sent over Capt. Henry Dayton to me, for to come to Provi­dence immediately, . . . ” Presumably Lieutenant Dayton [Smith, Marines, 438]


DEAN, JOHN

MA

Second Mate, Massachusetts Privateers


John Dean was a resident of Salem, Massachusetts. On 14 August 1780 he was aboard the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Pilgrim (Commander JOSEPH ROBINSON) as Second Mate. [Howe, Beverly Privateers, 414]


DEANE,

Commander, [unknown] Privateers


[unknown] Privateer [unknown] Vengeance was at sea in October 1779 under a Commander Deane. In October 1779 this Vengeane fought a well-contested action with the British brig Defiance. [Maclay, 118]


DEANE, STEWART

[NY]

Commander, New York Privateers


Stewart Deane, possibly from New York, was commissioned to the New York Privateer Sloop Beaver on 29 June 1776. On her first cruise, to St. Eustatius, Netherlands West Indies, with New York Privateer Brigantine Enterprise (Commander JOSEPH DWIGHT), a rich prize, the ship Earl of Errol, was captured. Beaver was back in port by 11 October 1776. [see Beaver]


DÉCANE, PIERRE

F/WI

[Owner], [Continental] Privateers


Pierre Décane was a merchant resident in St. Pierre, Martinique in early 1778. He was possibly an agent, or the owner of the [Continental] Privateer [unknown] Enterprize. [NDAR, XI, 319 and notes] Vessels associated with Décane were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

2/?/78

 

[unknown] Enterprize

 

[Pierre Décane]

 

[NDAR,XI, 319]


DE KAY, CHARLES

VA

Master, Virginia Navy


Charles de Kay [Decay] was a Master [Sailing Master] on the Virginia Navy Brig Musquetto (Captain JOHN HARRIS), presumably from about November 1777. He was aboard her on her cruise to the West Indies from 6 February 1777 until her capture by HM Frigate Ariadne on 4 June 1777. De Kay was subsequently taken to England and committed to Forton Prison until the close of the war. On 5 August 1778 the Virginia Assembly agreed to pay $46 in specie to de Kay, to repay a loan to him from Captain Harman Courter. He died in August or September 1829. [Stewart, 35-42 passim, 180]


DE LANDA, JOSEPH

PA

Owner, Pennsylvania Privateers

First Mate, Pennsylvania Privateers


Pennsylvania Privateer Schooner Vengeance was first commissioned on 23 July 1781 under Commander STEPHEN BENEZET. Vengeance was bonded by, among others, one of her co-owners, Joseph De Landa, of Philadelphia. De Landa was associated with JOSEPH GALLEGO in this vessel. [NRAR, 484] Vengeance was recommissioned on 4 November 1781 under JOSEPH PARKER. Owner Joseph de Landa served as First Mate. She was bonded for $20,000 by the two owners. [NRAR, 485] De Landa listed his age as 33. [NOAR, 87]


DE LA ROCHE, GILBERT

[See LA ROCHE, GILBERT DE]


DE ST. VALERY, NICHOLAS

(A)

Lieutenant, Continental Navy


Continental Navy, commissioned Lieutenant. [Allen, ii, 715]


DENNIE, THOMAS

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Thomas Dennie was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was usually associated with MUNGO MACKAY in his privateering ventures. Vessels associated with Dennie were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

10/2/80

MA

Ship Apollo (10/20)

Henry Skinner

Thomas Dennie et al

Henry Skinner, Thomas Dennie, Mungo Mackay

David Porter, Thomas Porter [NRAR, 229]

1/14/82

MA

Ship Apollo (10/25)

Bradbury Sanders

Thomas Dennie et al

Bradbury Sanders, Mungo Mackay, Thomas Dennie

Francis Bryant, William Payne [NRAR, 229]

12/13/82

MA

Ship Apollo (6/25)

Alexander Mackay

Thomas Dennie et al

Alexander Mackay, Thomas Dennie, Simeon Mayo

Daniel Sargent, Lendall Pitts [NRAR, 229]

12/13/82

MA

Brig Nonsuch (4/16)

Edward Davis

Thomas Dennie et al

Edward Davis, Thomas Dennie, Solomon Davis

William Davis, Francis Bryant [NRAR, 407]

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

10/2/80

MA

Brigantine Hope (4/10)

Ezekiel Burroughs

Mungo Mackay

Ezekiel Burroughs, Mungo Mackay, Thomas Dennie

Benjamin Tetard, David Porter [NRAR, 340]

10/2/80

MA

Ship Aurora (10/20)

David Porter

Mungo Mackay et al

David Porter, Mungo Mackay, Thomas Dennie

Ezekiel Burroughs, Benjamin Tetard [NRAR, 231]

2/10/83

MA

Schooner Hazard (4/14)

Samuel Barnes

Mungo Mackay et al

Samuel Barnes, Mungo Mackay, Thomas Dennie

Peter Boyer, Jr. [NRAR, 332]

As witness:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

5/27/82

MA

Schooner Ranger (4/20)

Joseph Christophers

Joseph Christophers et al

Joseph Christophers, Stephen Bruce, Giles Alexander

Thomas Dennie, George Horner [NRAR, 431]

8/7/82

MA

Galley Anti-Smuggler (sa/18)

John Percival

Nathaniel Freeman et al

John Percival, Samuel Brown, Russell Sturgis

John Hurd, Thomas Dennie [NRAR, 228]


DENNIS [DRING], WILLIAM

RI

Commander, Connecticut Privateers

Commander, Rhode Island Privateers


William Dennis [Dring] was born in 1750. [NOAR, 89] His first privateer command was the Rhode Island Privateer Sloop America, commissioned on 13 August 1776. [Sheffield, 59; NDAR, VI, 165 note] During the following cruise, in company with the Rhode Island Privateer Sloop Retaliation (Commander ISAAC JONES), the brigantine Countess of Eglington was captured. [see America, Retaliation] Rhode Island Privateer [unknown] General Sullivan was commissioned in 1777 (Commander HENRY OMAN). A General Sullivan was active in 1778 under Commander William Dennis. [Sheffield, 60; Middlebrook, II, 239] This was probably the same vessel. In March 1779, the sloop Refugee (Thomas Gilbert, Jr.) was captured by Dennis, which was brought into Stonington, Connecticut. [Middlebrook, II, 239] On 8 March 1780 he was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Vengeance. [NRAR, 484; Middlebrook, II, 239] Dennis died in 1826. [NOAR, 89] [Not to be confused with the WILLIAM DENNIS of Marblehead, Massachusetts]


DERBY, ELIAS HASKET

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Elias Hasket Derby was born in Salem, Massachusetts on 16 August 1739, the son of the very successful and wealthy merchant Richard Derby. The senior Derby had trading connections with Spain and the West Indies. In early life Elias kept the books and conducted the correspondence of his father, and he seems to have been the accountant of his family. From 1760 till 1775 he not only took charge of the books, wharves, and other property, but he engaged extensively in trade with the English and French west Indies islands, made important improvements in shipbuilding, and warmly espoused the cause of the colonists. He married Elizabeth Crowninshield, the daughter of a rival merchant family in 1759. As a wedding present, Richard had built for the couple the Georgian brick 2 1/2 story house known as the Derby House on Derby Street at the head of Derby Wharf.  Derby was known to his contemporaries as “King Derby,” and was a very substantial ship owner and merchant by the time the Revolution broke out. Having lost several ships early on to the Royal Navy, Derby began to arm his vessels as privateers. Derby also loaned the government supplies for the army, furnished boats for the troops, furnished the French fleet with coal, and was the leader in building a frigate for the nation. As the war progressed, Derby established shipyards, and studied naval architecture, to produce better privateers. Large, fast ships like the Astrea and the Grand Turk, which took many prizes, were the result. The end of the war saw Derby unquestionably the first man of business in Salem. Following the war Derby engaged extensively in trade with exotic locales around the world, and very successfully. When he died on 8 September 1799 he was the “first millionaire” in America. He was associated with the following privateers:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

6/13/76

MA

Schooner Sturdy Beggar (6/20)

Peter Lander

Elias Hasket Derby, Andrew Cabot

Peter Lander, Richard Derby, Jr., Elias Hasket Derby

[Allen, MPR, 289]

9/4/76

MA

Sloop Revenge (12/80)

Benjamin Warren

Elias Hasket Derby, Miles Greenwood, Joseph White

Benjamin Warren, Miles Greenwood, Joseph White

[Allen, MPR, 260; NDAR, VI, 674 and note]

8/13/77

MA

Sloop Patty (4/16)

Nathan Nichols

“Darbey & Nichols”

Nathan Nichols, Ichabod Nichols, Thomas Nichols

Nathaniel Peabody, Ebenezer Thompson [NRAR, 410]

5/12/77

MA

Schooner Centipede (2/35)

William Langdon

Elias Hasket Derby et al

William Langdon, Elias Hasket Derby, Joseph White

[Howe, BPR, 406; Allen, MPR, 94]

12/19/77

MA

Schooner Congress (4/20)

Ephraim Emerton

Elias Hasket Derby et al

Ephraim Emerton, Elias Hasket Derby, John Gardner, Nathan Goodale

[Allen, MPR, 102-103]

1/21/78

MA

Sloop Patty (6/30)

Samuel Hobbs

Elias Hasket Derby, Ichabod Nichols

Samuel Hobbs, Elias Hasket Derby, Ichabod Nichols

[Allen, MPR, 233]

2/27/78

MA

Schooner Scorpion (0/40)

John Brooks

Elias Hasket Derby, Ichabod Nichols

John Brooks, Elias Hasket Derby, Ichabod Nichols

[Allen, MPR, 276]

4/10/78

MA

Schooner Lexington (0/25)

Joseph Cook

Elias Hasket Derby et al

Joseph Cook, Elias Hasket Derby, Ichabod Nichols

[Allen, MPR, 204]

5/23/78

MA

Schooner Centipede (0/35)

Samuel Ingersoll

Elias Hasket Derby, Joseph White

Samuel Ingersoll, Elias Hasket Derby, Joseph White

[Howe, BPR, 406; Allen, MPR, 94]

7/18/78

MA

Schooner Congress (8/40)

Samuel Hobbs

Elias Hasket Derby, John Gardner, Nathan Goodale

Samuel Hobbs, Elias Hasket Derby, John Gardner, Nathan Goodale

[Allen, MPR, 103]

7/31/78

MA

Schooner Scorpion (0/35)

William Gray

Elias Hasket Derby, Miles Greenwood

William Gray, Elias Hasket Derby, Miles Greenwood

[Allen, MPR, 276]

10/13/78

MA

Brig Monmouth (10/60)

Samuel Ingersoll

Elias Hasket Derby

Samuel Ingersoll, Elias Hasket Derby, Ichabod Nichols

[Allen, MPR, 223]

10/14/78

MA

Brigantine Franklin (18/120)

John Leach, Jr.

Elias Hasket Derby, Jacob Ashton, Bartholomew Putnam

John Leach, Jr., Elias Hasket Derby, Jacob Ashton, Bartholomew Putnam

[Howe, BPR, 410, 431; Allen, MPR, 136]

10/26/78

MA

Schooner Roebuck (10/50)

William Gray

Elias Hasket Derby

William Gray, Elias Hasket Derby, Nathaniel Silsbee

[Allen, MPR, 266]

3/30/79

MA

Brigantine Franklin (18/100)

Joseph Robinson

Elias Hasket Derby

Joseph Robinson, Elias Hasket Derby, Bartholomew Putnam

[Howe, BPR, 410; Allen, MPR, 136]

4/15/79

MA

Ship Hunter (18/110)

Nathan Brown

Elias Hasket Derby et al

Nathan Brown, Elias Hasket Derby, Bartholomew Putnam

[Allen, MPR, 183-184]

4/15/79

MA

Brigantine Fame (16/100)

Samuel Hobbs

Elias Hasket Derby

Samuel Hobbs, Elias Hasket Derby, Nathaniel Silsbee

[Allen, MPR, 126]

8/3/79

MA

Schooner Centipede (4/50)

Gideon Henfield

Elias Hasket Derby

Gideon Henfield, Robert Stone, Simon Forrester

[Howe, BPR, 406; Allen, MPR, 95]

8/3/79

MA

Ship Roebuck (12/80)

Jonathan Felt

Elias Hasket Derby

Jonathan Felt, Elias Hasket Derby, Nathaniel Silsbee

[Allen, MPR, 266]

10/29/79

MA

Ship Three Sisters (10/40)

Nathaniel West

Elias Hasket Derby

Nathaniel West, Elias Hasket Derby, Nathaniel Silsbee

[Allen, MPR, 302]

11/25/79

MA

Sloop Nancy (8/12)

David Smith

Elias Hasket Derby

David Smith, Elias Hasket Derby, Nehemiah Holt

[Allen, MPR, 226]

11/25/79

MA

Ship Salem Packet (16/25)

Joseph Cook

Elias H. Derby et al

Joseph Cook, Elias Hasket Derby, Nehemiah Holt

[Allen, MPR, 272]

3/22/80

MA

Brigantine Hasket and John (18/24)

John Collins

Elias Hasket Derby

John Collins, Elias Hasket Derby, Nehemiah Felt

[Allen, MPR, 167]

4/18/80

MA

Brig Lexington (6/15)

David Smith, Jr.

Elias Hasket Derby et al

David Smith, Jr., Elias Hasket Derby, Nathaniel Silsbee

[Allen, MPR, 205]

4/18/80

MA

Brigantine Fame (18/30)

Nicholas Lamprell

Elias Hasket Derby

Nicholas Lamprell, Elias Hasket Derby, Nathaniel Silsbee

[Allen, MPR, 126]

8/7/80

MA

Brigantine Hasket and John (10/35)

Benjamin Crowinshield

Elias Hasket Derby

Benjamin Crowinshield, Elias Hasket Derby, John Collins

[Allen, MPR, 167]

9/25/80

MA

Sloop MorningStar (10/50)

John Ravel

Elias Hasket Derby

 

[Allen, MPR, 226]

12/18/80

MA

Sloop MorningStar (8/12)

Francis Roch

Elias Hasket Derby

Francis Roch, Elias Hasket Derby, William Colman

Joseph Chandler [NRAR, 397]

6/13/81

MA

Ship Grand Turk (28/140)

Thomas Simmons

Elias Hasket Derby et al

Thomas Simmons, Elias Hasket Derby, Robert Stone

Thomas Saunders, William Colman [NRAR, 320]

9/4/81

MA

Brigantine Young Richard (10/20)

William Ropes

Elias Hasket Derby

[Petition: Elisha Sigourney for Derby]

[Allen, MPR, 330]

9/27/81

MA

Ship Grand Turk (24/100)

Joseph Pratt

Elias Hasket Derby et al

Joseph Pratt, Elias Hasket Derby, Thomas Saunders

Nehemiah Holt [NRAR, 321]

9/29/81

MA

Ship Patty (8/20)

Simon Forrester

Elias Hasket Derby et al

Simon Forrester, Elias Hasket Derby, Thomas Saunders

Nehemiah Holt [NRAR, 410]

10/29/81

MA

Brig Revolt (8/20)

Henry Phelps

Elias Hasket Derby et al

Henry Phelps, Elias Hasket Derby, William Colman

Benjamin Colman [NRAR, 442]

11/25/81

MA

Brig Lexington (10/20)

David Smith

Elias Hasket Derby, Thomas Saunders

David Smith, Elias Hasket Derby, Thomas Saunders

John Brown [NRAR, 371]

11/26/81

MA

Ship Salem Packet (12/30)

Joseph Cook

Elias H. Derby et al

Joseph Cook, Elias Hasket Derby, Thomas Saunders

John Brown [NRAR, 451]

2/12/82

MA

Schooner Fly (6/25)

Christopher Babbidge

Elias Hasket Derby

Christopher Babbidge, Nathaniel Silsbee, Elijah Hasket

Thomas Phillips, John Newell [NRAR, 297]

2/12/82

MA

Ship Exchange (20/40)

Simon Forrester

Elias Hasket Derby

Simon Forrester, Elias Hasket Derby, Nathaniel Silsbee

Jonathan Felt, Thomas Phillips [NRAR, 284]

3/8/82

MA

Ship Patty (8/20)

John Derby

Elias Hasket Derby

John Derby, Elias Hasket Derby

Thomas Saunders [NRAR, 411]

5/9/82

MA

Brig Lexington (14/50)

Benjamin Crowinshield

Elias Hasket Derby, Thomas Saundersl

Benjamin Crowinshield, Elias Hasket Derby, Thomas Saunders

Elias Hasket Derby, William Colman [NRAR, 372]

6/29/82

MA

Ship Patty (8/20)

David Smith

Elias Hasket Derby et al

David Smith. Jr., Elias Hasket Derby, Thomas Saunders

Mehitable Harris [NRAR, 411]

6/29/82

MA

Ship Salem Packet (9/20)

John Brewer

Elias H. Derby

John Brewer, Elias Hasket Derby, Thomas Saunders

Mehitable Harris [NRAR, 451]

9/23/82

MA

Ship Good Luck (8/20)

Jonathan Neall

Elias Hasket Derby

Jonathan Neall, Elias Hasket Derby, William Colman

Benjamin Colman [NRAR, 318]

12/19/82

MA

Ship Astrea (20/50)

John Derby

Elias Hasket Derby

John Derby, Elias Hasket Derby, William Colman

David Sears [NRAR, 230]

As bonder:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

6/24/80

MA

Sloop Race Horse (8/20)

Clifford Byrne

Nathaniel Silsbee et al

Clifford Byrne, Elias Hasket Derby, Nathaniel Silsbee

[Allen, MPR, 247]

10/9/80

MA

Ship Roebuck (14/90)

Gideon Henfield

Nathaniel Silsbee

Gideon Henfield, Elias Hasket Derby, Nathaniel Silsbee

Aaron Croel, Joseph Marchant [NRAR, 446]

3/6/81

MA

Ship Exchange (20/60)

John Collins

Nathaniel Silsbee et al

John Collins, Elias Hasket Derby, Nathaniel Silsbee

Peter Kingget [NRAR, 283]


DERBY, JOHN

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


John Derby was a resident of Salem, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Patty on 8 March 1782 [NRAR, 411] and then to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Astrea on 19 December 1782. [NRAR, 230] In January 1783 Derby recaptured the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Speedwell (Commander John Ingersoll) off Halifax, Nova Scotia, and escorted her safely into Salem. [NOAR, 89, 162]


DESHON, DANIEL

CT

Captain, Connecticut Navy


Daniel Deshon was a merchant marine master in the service of NATHANIEL SHAW, JR. In April 1776 he was captured in the John and Joseph while importing powder for Shaw on a Continental contract. On 26 September 1776 Shaw recommended Deshon to the Council of Safety as Second Lieutenant of the Connecticut Navy Brig Defence. [NDAR, 6, 1005] Made a voyage to Martinique and sailed for home on 10 January 1777, arriving at New London on 11 February 1777. [NDAR, 7, 1201] Deshon advertised for a deserter from the "old" Connecticut Navy Brigantine Defence, at Stonington, on 29 August 1777, as Captain. [NDAR, 9, 848]


DEXTER, THOMAS

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Thomas Dexter was a resident of Salem, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Tartar on 11 October 1782. [NRAR, 473] Dexter was again commissioned, on 9 December 1782, to the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Dart. [NRAR, 263]


DICK, ALEXANDER

VA

Captain of Marines, Virginia Marines


Alexander Dick was a native of Fredericksburg, and known familiarly as “Sawney Dick.” He was probably the “Captain Alexander” who was paid £83.10.0 for a month’s half pay for himself and his officers and to recruit Marines on 23 April 1776. [NDAR, IV, 1428-1429. According to Sanchez-Saavedra "A Guide to Virginia Military Organizations in the American Revolution. 1774-1787," his was the first company of Virginia Marines raised.] Dick was commissioned on 15 June 1776 on the Defiance. On 4 December 1776 he was ordered on board the Manley, with his company. [NOAR, 91] Dick was appointed as Captain of Marines on the Mosquito on 24 July 1776. [Stewart, 180] Dick and the other prisoners were transported from Barbados to Gosport, England and put in Forton Prison.[Stewart, 39] Dick was committed on 8 August 1777. [NOAR, 90-91] Dick tried to get all the privates confined in the same area, perhaps with a view to a mass escape. [Stewart, 39] He escaped in early 1779. On 22 November 1779 Dick presented a petition to the Virginia House of Delegates asking payment of a debt of 1650 guineas made during imprisonment and subsequent escape, and asking for an advance in rank. [Stewart, 41] After returning from prison he became a Major in the land service, and was at Yorktown. His will was probated in 1786. [Stewart, 180]


DICK, JAMES

MA

Midshipman, Continental Navy


James Dick was from Massachusetts. [NOAR, 91] He enlisted in the Continental Navy at Baltimore, Maryland on 21 February 1777. He received an advance of £7.10.0 and was assigned to Continental Navy Brig Lexington (Captain HENRY JOHNSON) as a Midshipman. [NDAR, IX, 502-507] Dick sailed with Lexington for France on 26 February 1777 and arrived at Nantes on 3 April 1777. In the voyage two prizes were taken. He was aboard during the stunning cruise of Captain LAMBERT WICKES' squadron around Ireland, in which twenty prizes were captured or destroyed, 28 May 1777 to 27 June 1777. Lexington sailed for America in September 1777. On 19 September she was captured after a long and hard battle by HM Cutter Alert (Lieutenant John Bazely). [NDAR, IX, 657]


DICKSON [DICKENSON],

Captain, Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron


Dickson was at Crown Point on 18 August 1776, in command of the Continental Army Lake Champlain Sloop Enterprise. [NDAR, 6, 224]


DICKINSON, JEREMIAH

SC

Commander, South Carolina Privateers


Jeremiah Dickinson was in command of South Carolina Privateer Sloop Rachel at an unknown date. [Coker, 300]


DILLAWAY, ARTHUR

MA

Lieutenant, Continental Navy

[Prize Master], Massachusetts Privateers


Arthur Dillaway was a native of Massachusetts. Hen entered aboard the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Rising States (Commander James Thompson), probably as a Prize Master. Rising States sailed on a cruise to Europe on 29 January 1777. On 3 April 1777, in the Bay of Biscay, the brig Fleece was captured. Dillaway was assigned as her prize master, and took her into L’Orient, France on 24 April 1777. After arranging the sale of the prize, Dillaway enlisted aboard the Continental Navy Sloop Dolphin (Captain Samuel Nicholson) as Master. He was aboard by 24 May 1777. [See Rising States; Dolphin] On 19 September 1777 he was promoted to Lieutenant. [NOAR, 91]


DOAN, HEMAN

[see DOANE, HERMAN]


DOANE [DOAN], HERMAN [HEMAN]

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Herman Doane (as Heman Doan) was aboard the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Boston (Commander WILLIAM BROWN) as First Lieutenant when she was commissioned on 24 September 1776. [NDAR, VI, 922 and note] Boston sailed about 1 November 1776 and captured six prizes before returning to Boston, Massachusetts on 25 March 1777. [see Boston] He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Sturdy Beggar on 26 July 1777. [NOAR, 92]


DOANE, SETH

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Seth Doane was born in 1753. [NOAR, 92] He was a resident of Chatham, Connecticut. He was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Harlequin on 16 December 1778. [NOAR, 92, makes this year as 1781, which is incorrect] Doane sailed for the West Indies where he captured a sloop with coffee, cocoa and some slaves. A legal proceeding in the Hartford County Maritime Court led to Doane’s testifying, on 24 September 1781, that he received five shares from this prize. [Middlebrook, MCR, II, 112] Doane died in 1802. [NOAR, 92]


DOBEL [DOBLE], JOSEPH

MD

Lieutenant, Continental Navy

Captain, Massachusetts Navy


On 10 July 1777 the Board appointed Joseph Dobel (former First Lieutenant of the Continental Navy Frigate Hancock) to be captain of the Massachusetts Navy Ship [Bark] Adams, which was to be converted from a trading vessel to a prison vessel in Boston Harbor. Dobel was to receive £6 per month wages plus rations, and was to enlist a mate and four sailors.[NDAR, 9, 253-254] On 11 August the Board ordered Dobel to allow his prisoners to remain on deck until 2200 during the summer heat. [NDAR, 9, 733] The Massachusetts Board of War determined to use Adams as a trading vessel by 13 November 1777, when the Board of War instructed Captain Isaac Phillips to procure a captain and crew for the Adams and prepare her for sea.[NDAR, X, 476 and note] The next day Doble was instructed to take his prisoners ashore and turn over the ship to Phillips.[NDAR, X, 484 and note] However, on 18 November the Board of War ordered the Commissary General to deliver various supplies to Dobel for the use of the prisoners on the prison ship. [NDAR, X, 530]


DODGE, JOSEPH

CT

Commander, Connecticut Privateers

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


Joseph Dodge was a resident of Stonington, Connecticut. [Middlebrook, Maritime Connecticut During The Revolution, II, 54-55] He was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Sally on 4 August 1777. [NOAR, 93] Dodge was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Beaver on 6 March 1778. Beaver sailed on her cruise from New London, Connecticut, in May 1778. She encountered HM Frigate Maidstone, which promptly chased Beaver back into New London, and narrowly missed capturing the privateer. Dodge got back out and captured the sloop Morning Star (Peter Woglam) and the Seaflower (George Webster). Dodge left the Beaver in June 1778. [Middlebrook, Maritime Connecticut During The Revolution, II, 54-55] On 29 November 1779 he was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Sloop Maria, sailing out of Boston, Massachusetts. [NOAR, 93]


DODGE, JOSEPH

RI

Commander, Connecticut Privateers


Joseph Dodge was born about 1753, and was a resident of Westerly, Rhode Island about 1782. He was described as 5'7" tall, with a dark complexion, dark eyes and dark hair. He listed his age as 29 about 1782. Dodge was commissioned to the Connecticut Privateer Sloop Centurion about March 1782. Centurion captured a whaleboat on 3 April 1782 and the British Privateer Sloop Hussey on 13 April. [Middlebrook, MCR, II, 65. This may be the same individual as the one above.]


DODGET, NATHAN

[see NATHAN DOGETT]


DOGETT [DOGGETT, DOGETT, DODGET, DODGETT], NATHAN

CT

Pilot, Connecticut Navy


Nathan Dogett (Doggett, Dodget) entered as Pilot on the Connecticut Navy Brig Defence on 7 June 1776 and apparently remained aboard until 15 November 1776. [NDAR, 7, 170-177] He was paid L18 by NATHANIEL SHAW, JR. for piloting on two trips to Bedford, one on 28 April 1777 and one on 23 May 1777. [NDAR, 8, 1022-1023] Dogett was paid for wages from 15 November 1776 to 15 June 1777 on the latter date. [NDAR, 8, 116-118]


DONALDSON [DOLLANSON], JOHN

MA

Commander, Massachusetts Privateers


John Donaldson [Dollanson] was a resident of Salem, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Captain on 9 February 1781. On 20 August 1781 Captain captured a notorious Loyalist privateer skipper, one Pomroy, who had sailed out of Penobscot in a vessel with a crew of thirty-two men. She was brought into Salem. In 1782 Captain was captured by the British. [Allen, MPR, 91] On 12 April 1782 Donaldson was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Fox. Accoding to this source Donaldson was captured in 1782. It is unclear whether he was in the Captain or the Fox at that time. [NOAR, 93]


DONALDSON, JOHN

PA

Owner, Pennsylvania Privateers


John Donaldson was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was part of the firm of Erskine, Donaldson & Co. (see WILLIAM ERSKINE) which was listed, either collectively or individually, as the owners of several Pennsylvania privateers. Vessels associated with Donaldson were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

6/7/77

PA

Schooner Beggars Benison (4/17)

Samuel Smallcorn

Erskine, Donaldson & Co.

Samuel Smallcorn, George Gains, Jacob Sheafe, Jr.

Ebenezer Thompson, Jonathan Blanchard [NRAR, 233]

2/8/81

PA

Brigantine Charming Polly (6/25)

Alexander T. Ogilvie

John Donnaldson, William Erskine & Co.

John Donnaldson, Alexander T. Ogilvie

James Trimble [NRAR, 252]


DORSEY, NATHAN

MD

Surgeon, Continental Navy

Surgeon, Maryland Navy


Nathan Dorsey, a native of Maryland, was appointed as Surgeon's Mate on the Maryland Navy Ship Defence (Captain JAMES NICHOLSON) on 1 March 1776. He was promoted to Surgeon in September 1776 aboard the Defence (Captain GEORGE COOK). [NOAR, 94] On 10 February 1777 Dorsey entered the Continental Navy as Surgeon, assigned to the Continental Navy Brig Lexington (Captain HENRY JOHNSON). Dorsey sailed with the Lexington to France (26 February 1777-3 April 1777) and probably was aboard her during the cruise of Captain LAMBERT WICKES' squadron (28 May 1777-27 June 1777) during which some twenty prizes were captured or destroyed. It is possible that Dorsey left the Lexington in late June 1777. [NDAR, IX, 502-507, 663, 665]


DOUGLAS, WILLIAM

CT

Commodore, Continental Army Lake Champlain Squadron


William Douglas was a native of Connecticut who had engaged in the West India trade before the war. [Bird, Navies, 149] On 1 May he was appointed as a Captain in the 1st Connecticut. Douglas had subsequently been named as an aide-de-camp to Brigadier General David Wooster. [NDAR, "Connecticut Journal, November 22, 1775," 2, 1100 and note] Douglas had been promoted to Major. [Bird, Navies, 149] He was selected as Commodore by Montgomery in the beginning of the St. Johns campaign, at a salary of £15 per month. [NDAR, "Connecticut Journal, November 22, 1775," 2, 1100 and note] Douglas was tall and thin, sick with the disease that was to kill him, tuberculosis. Nevertheless, he handled his little fleet with "boldness and wisdom." [Bird, Navies, 149] Douglas was with the northern army during the seige of St. Johns. He was credited with the action that sank one large British boat, and used his little squadron to keep the British shipping in check. After the fall of the fort he managed the surviving vessels and prepared them for the winter, and salvaged several British vessels. [Bird, Navies, 158-160] Douglas was at Fort Ticonderoga on 2 December 1775. [NDAR, "Certificate of Commodore William Douglas," 2, 1231] On 24 January 1776, Major General Schuyler asked Congress to attend to the naval department on the lakes. Schuyler was hopeful that Douglas might remain (apparently he was then at Albany). [NDAR, "Major General Philip Schuyler to John Hancock," 3, 957] Congress was still under the impression that Douglas was acting as commodore on 5 February 1776. [NDAR, "Journal of the Continental Congress," 3, 1137] Douglas had returned to his home near New York and Schuyler was unsure whether he intended to return. He asked to New York Provincial Congress to inquire after Douglas on 8 March 1776. [NDAR, "Major General Philip Schuyler to Nathaniel Woodhull," 4, 233] Douglas was in New York on 9 March, when he and others sold their share in the New York Navy Sloop Hampden (lately captured by the British) to Jacobus Van Zandt (acting for New York). [NDAR, "Indenture Concerning the Pilot Boat Hampden," 4, 262-263] On 16 March the New York Provincial Congress ordered Captain Jacobus Wynkoop (about to be appointed as a Captain on the lakes) to contact Douglas and find out if he was going to serve on the Lake again. [NDAR, "Journal of the New York Provincial Congress," 4, 364] On 18 March Wynkoop reported that Douglas had declined giving an answer, but noted that if he did undertake the service it would be two months before he could do so. The Committee396, 421, 475, 476, 477, 1252, 1309, 1310, 1381, 1392


DOWNER, ELIPHALET

MA

Surgeon, Massachusetts Privateers

Surgeon, Continental Navy


Eliphalet Downer was a Surgeon aboard the Massachusetts Privateer Sloop Yankee (Commander HENRY JOHNSON), commissioned 23 May 1776. [NDAR, 5, 215] Johnson took her to sea at once, sailing out of Boston  [NDAR, 5, 970-971] to intercept the West India traffic in the Gulf of Florida. [NDAR, 6, 1026 and note] On 22 June 1776 [NDAR, 5, 1110-1111 and 1111 note] Yankee fell in with the 300-ton [NDAR, 5, 970-971] ship Zachariah Bayley (James Hodges). [NDAR, 5, 1026 and note] According to Hodges this was at 29o54'N, 70o30'W. [NDAR, 6, 516-517] Zachariah Bayley was armed and made some resistance before surrendering. [NDAR, 5, 969-970 and 970 note] On 26 June, at 31o00'N, 68o30'W [NDAR, 6, 516] a sail was sighted and\ Yankee gave chase. The chase was the 200-ton British Army Transport Ship Creighton (George Ross), [NDAR, 5, 970-971; 5, 969 and note; 5, 1026 and note] taken after a short fight. With the crews of the two captured ships aboard the Yankee, and his own crew depleted by the two prize crews, the ratio of prisoners to crew aboard Johnson's sloop was considerably lowered. All told there were fourteen prisoners aboard, and only twenty-five Americans. Only two officers were on the Yankee, Johnson and Surgeon Eliphalet Downer, and only two warrant officers. [NDAR, 6, 516-517] On 3 July 1776, at 36o40'N, 65o00'W, the British prisoners moved and captured the sloop. The American crew was then secured below decks, some being put in irons. [NDAR, 6, 538-539] On 31 July the Yankee was off Dover, England, where the British sent word to the Admiralty of their arrival. [NDAR, 6, 516-517, 517-518] The American crew was confined below decks, in a small hold, with only a two inch square grating for ventilation. The heat and smell were stifling and sickness threatened the men. Only two or three were allowed on deck at a time. There was no relief from the heat on deck. Johnson was subjected to rude insults and threats. When the sloop arrived in the Thames River, numerous people were allowed aboard to look at the crew, as if they were strange zoo specimens from another land. Johnson and Downer were allowed to room in a small cabin. [NDAR, 6, 517-518, 529-531] On 4 August 1776 the crew was removed from the Yankee into the transport ship Justitia, which took them to Dover Castle. [NDAR, 6, 532-533, 538-539] They were then placed on HMS Ardent, and then, on 15 August, ten were ordered to Spithead, to serve aboard or be kept aboard HMS Barfleur. The remainder were ordered to be kept aboard HMS Mars. [NDAR, 6, 546] On 16 August, those of the crew who wished to serve in the Royal Navy were allowed to enlist, but only for service in the East Indies or the Mediterranean. The four officers were to be confined. [NDAR, 6, 546-547, 547] There were not four prisoners for long, however: in the night of 30/31 August Johnson escaped from HMS Mars. [NDAR, 6, 581] Downer must have gotten away soon after, for he enlisted as Surgeon aboard the Continental Navy Sloop Dolphin (Captain SAMUEL NICHOLSON) on 16 April 1777. [NDAR, IX, 407-408] Downer had difficulties with Captain Nicholson. On 9 July 1777 Nicholson, in a letter to the American Commissioners to France, noted that Downer had written to them regarding Nicholson's treatment of him. Downer, said Nicholson, had complained to Captain Lambert Wickes, the senior naval officer, who had taken no action. Nicholson had made sure Downer understood that he, Nicholson, was Downer's superior officer. Now Downer wanted his discharge. Nicholson asked for instructions on this matter. [NDAR, IX, 482 and note]


DRING, WILLIAM

[see DENNIS, WILLIAM]


DUMAINE [DUMOINE], DANIEL

[MA]

[Owner, Massachusetts Privateers]


Daniel Dumaine [Dumoine] was supposedly a resident of Boston, Massachusetts when he bonded the Massachusetts Privateer Schooner Aurora (Commander Rene Chaloche) on 2 November 1781. [NRAR, 231] Dumaine (as Dumoine) had petitioned the Continental Congress on 11 July 1780, regarding the cruise of the privateer Brilliant, her prizes and her capture. Peter Joseph Lion was associated with this petition. [NRAR, 151] The petition was referred to the Board of Admiralty, which reported on 10 March 1781. [NRAR, 173]


DUMOINE, [DANIEL]

see DUMAINE, DANIEL


DUNCAN, ROBERT

PA

Owner, Pennsylvania Privateers


Robert Duncan was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (See RICHARD HUMPHREYS, JOHN FLAHAVAN, THOMAS FLAHAVAN). Vessels associated with Duncan were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

3/18/80

PA

Brig Argo (14/60)

John Ridge

Robert Duncan, Richard Humphretys & Co.

Robert Duncan, Richard Humphreys

James Trimble [NRAR, 229]

12/28/81

PA

Brigantine Betsey (8/20)

George Fleming

John Flahavan, Thomas Flahavan, Robert Duncan, Jr.

John Flahavan, Robert Duncan, Jr.

James Trimble, John Connelly [NRAR, 238]


DUNKIN, EDMUND

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


Edmund Dunkin was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was associated in privateering with HENRY MITCHELL. Vessels associated with Dunkin were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Bonder

Witness

2/6/79

NA

Sloop Abigail (6/12)

Daniel Smith

Henry Mitchell, Edmund Dunkin

Daniel Smith, Henry Mitchell, Edmund Dunkin

[Allen, MPR, 65]


DUNN, BENJAMIN

PA (P)

Captain, Continental Navy


Benjamin Dunn entered as Master on the Continental Navy Brig Andrea Doria (Captain NICHOLAS BIDDLE) on 18 December 1775. He was later promoted to First Lieutenant. [NDAR, IX, 1007-1011] On 13 January 1777, the Continental Congress ordered the prize sloop (HM Sloop Racehorse) captured by Andrea Doria purchased and fitted out for the Continental Navy.  At that time she was at Philadelphia. [NDAR, VII, 946] On 14 January, she was named Surprize and Benjamin Dunn was appointed Lieutenant and Commander of her. [NDAR, VII, 954 and note] Surprize was fitting out at Philadelphia on 17 March 1777. [NDAR, VIII, 711-712] On 18 April  she was ordered to assist the Pennsylvania Navy in opening the Cape May Channel, with the Andrea Doria and the Fly, under command of Isaiah Robinson. When this mission was finished, Dunn was to open sealed orders and proceed on his voyage (he had a cargo aboard). [NDAR, VIII, 367, 367-368, 368-369]  These orders were to proceed to Cape Francois in St. Domangue and report to Commercial Agent Stephen Ceronio.  Dunn was to land his cargo,  pick up a return cargo, and return to America, trying for a southern port. If there was no cargo at Cape Francois, Surprize was to proceed to Cap Nicola Mole and report to John Dupuy. In any case, Dunn was to recruit his crew if possible. If there was no cargo, Dunn was permitted to cruise until 1 July 1777, when further sealed orders were to be opened. [NDAR, VIII, 380-381 and 381 note] He was ordered into squadron under Captain Isaiah Robinson (Andrea Doria) with mission to clear the Cape May Channel of British cruisers on 5 August 1777. [NDAR, IX, 711-712] On 25 August, following an attack ordered to be made on the British fleet in the Delaware River, Surprize was to get to sea with Andrew Doria and Delaware. [NDAR, IX, 806-807] On 19 September, she was part of the American fleet stationed off Marcus hook in the Delaware River. [NDAR, IX, 942] On 26 September, following the fall of Philadelphia, Surprize was part of Charles Alexander's squadron ordered to prevent the British fleet coming up the river.  If unable to prevent this,  the American vessels were to go upriver as far as possible. [NDAR, IX, 969-970] Surprize may have gotten past Philadelphia during the Battle off Philadelphia on 27 September 1777. [NDAR, IX, 974-975] If Dunn was promoted to captain the date is unknown. The references to “Captain Dunn” may be no more than the usual eighteenth century courtesy to a commanding officer. Surprize was in the mixed Pennsylvania Navy-Continental Navy fleet defending the Delaware River in the autumn of 1777. She was not an active participant in the fighting because of the nature of the river and the campaign. On 14 November 1777 Dunn attended an important council-of-war held aboard Pennsylvania Navy Galley Chatham, signing the official results of the council. [NDAR, X, 488 and 489 notes] On the early morning of 20 November, Surprize’s officers intercepted some deserters from the Continental Navy Xebec Repulse. [NDAR, X, 598-601] Following the fall of Forts Mifflin and Mercer, on the morning of 21 November, according to previously made plans Surprize and the other Continental vessels in the Delaware River below Philadelphia  were set on fire. [NDAR, X, 568-569 and notes] The officers and crews got safely up to Bordentown, New Jersey.[NDAR, X, 666 and notes] Dunn testified in the trial of the deserters from the Repulse, held on 25 November aboard the ship Lion at Bordentown. [NDAR, X, 598-601]


DUNN, JOHN

PA

First Lieutenant, Pennsylvania Privateers


John Dunn was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was aboard the Pennsylvania Privateer Boat Black Joke (Commander ENOCH WILLETT) as Lieutenant when she was commissioned on 30 July 1781. Black Joke took two prizes in August 1781. [see Black Joke]


DUNN, SAMUEL, JR.

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers 256, 252, 422


Samuel Dunn, Jr. was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts. He was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Brigantine Venus on 7 July 1777. [NOAR, 98] Dunn was commissioned to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Prosper on 7 June 1781, [NRAR, 422] and, to the Massachusetts Privateer Ship Charming Sally on 21 December 1782. [NRAR, 252] In addition he served as security for several vessels, thus indicating a possible ownership interest. Vessels associated with Dunn were:

As security:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Owners

Bonder

Witness

10/18/79

MA

Ship Tartar (20/130)

David Porter

Mungo Mackay

David Porter, Samuel Dunn, Jr., Mungo Mackay

Thomas Porter, Mungo Mackay, Jr. [Allen, MPR, 295]

3/14/82

MA

Ship Moore (14/40)

Ezekiel Burroughs

Mungo Mackay

Ezekiel Burroughs, Mungo Mackay, Samuel Dunn, Jr.

Joseph Coolidge, Samuel Prince [NRAR, 397]

7/20/82

MA

Brigantine Lady Washington (6/15)

William White

John Codman, Samuel Dunn et al

William White, John Codman, Jr., Samuel Dunn, Jr.

Mungo Mackay, Jr., William Palfrey [NRAR, 367]


DUNTON, WILLIAM

PA

Owner, Pennsylvania Privateers


William Dunton was a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Vessels associated with Dunton were:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

8/25/81

PA

Boat Tartar (†/27)

Solomon Hammer

Nathaniel Twining, William Dunton & Co.

William Dunton, Nathaniel Twining

John Geyer, Frederick Snider [NRAR, 472]


DUREY, PHILIP

[see DU ROY, PHILIP JACQUELIN


DU ROY [DUREY], PHILIP JACQUELIN

PA

Owner, Pennsylvania Privateers

Commander, Pennsylvania Privateers


Philip Jacquelin Du Roy (or Durey) was commissioned on 28 October 1780 to the Pennsylvania Privateer Brigantine Active. Du Roy was also her owner, and listed his address as Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [NRAR, 218]

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

10/28/80

PA

Brigantine Active (4/20)

Philip Jacquelin Du Roy

Philip Jacquelin Du Roy

Philip Jacquelin Du Roy, James Oellers

[NRAR, 218]


DYSON, JOHN

MA

Owner, Massachusetts Privateers


John Dyson was a resident of Beverly, Massachusetts. Dyson was associated with the following privateers:

As owner:

Date

State

Rig/Name/Guns/Crew

Commander

Co-owners

Security

Witness

5/11/80

MA

Schooner Adventure (6/25)

William James

John Dyson

John Dyson, Benjamin Goldthwait

[Allen, MPR, 68]


Revised 23 August 2014 © awiatsea.com